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August 02, 1930 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1930-08-02

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ESTABLISHED
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MEMBER OF THE

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VOL. X. NO. 29.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1930

PRICE FIVE CENT

GRODESBEC ISSUES
B ru c k e r T a lk s to G re e n v ille
Audience and Urges
Gas Tax be Kept.
JUDGE JEFFRIES SPEAKS

EDISON QUESTIONNAIRE FURNISHES
SOME STUMPERS FOR. CONTESTANTS

j (By Associ
WEST ORANGE, N. J., Aug. 1.-
Here are some of 20 pages of ques-
tions propounded Thursday to 49
boys in Thomas A. Edison's exam-
ination of candidates for his schol-
arship to. a technical school.
They were reported by Edison,
Henry Ford, Harvey S. Firestone,
Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, Lewis
Perry of Phillips Exeter academy,{
George Eastman, President, Will-1
iam Lowe Bryan of Indiana univer-
sity and Dr. Hubert S. Howe of Col-
umbia university.
"When you look back on your
life from your death bed, by what
facts will you determine whether
you have succeeded or failed?"
"Name the planets in the solar
system."
"What is a light year?"

Former "OlIdLine Democrat
Principal Speaker on
Detroit Program.

Is

(By 'Associated Press',
LANSING, Michigan, August 1.
-Alex J. Groesbeck, Attorney Gen-
eral.Brucker and Judge Edward J
Jeffries, who seek the Republicar
nomination for governor of Michi-
gan, appeared before groups o
voters Thursday with their solu-
tions of state and national prob-
lems.
Groesbeck, four times governor.
told a Ferndale audience Thursday
night that completion of Wider
Woodward Ave. in the Detroit area
and a reconstruction of the state's
fiscal program are the major prob-
lems confronting whoever takes of-
fice at Lansing Jan. 1.
'Praises Gas Tax
Brucker, standard-bearer of the
Green administration, in a speech
at Greenville upheld the present
gasoline tax and attacked the par-
dons and paroles issued by former
Gov. Groesbeck as contributory'
factors in the state's criminal situ-
atioin.
Judge Jeffries, former old-line
Democrat, who left his party, ex-
plaining, "They'll listen to you as a
Republican," appeared before a De-
troit luncheon club with the plea
that he be elected governor so he
could whip congress into line on
farm relief legislation.
Groesbeck Begins Campaign
Groesbeck's appearance Thurs-
day night was the first he had
made since he announced he was
seeking a return to the governor-
ship. His speech was before the
Southern Oakland County Groes-
beck-for-Governor club. The for-
mer governor accused the other
candidate of failure to bring out
the real issues of the campaign as
they affect the welfare of the state.
He advocated careful consideration
of taxation to relieve the taxpayers
and reconstruction of the state's
financial program.
Judge Jeffries indicated that his
entire campaign would be based on
his urgent advocacy of farm relief.
VISITORS TO SEE
MOON FEATURES
Observatory to Offer Students
Unusual Telescope Views.
Visitors' nights at the observatory
next' week will give Summer Ses-
sion 'students an opportunity to in-
spect the apparatus at the Univer-
sity observatory as well as to view
the moon through a high-power
telescope.
The instrumental .equipment that
will be shown to the visitors in-
cludes the observatory's 37 1-2 inch
telescope, used only for spectro-
seopic work; the meridian circle,
used for determining exact time by
observation of stars crossing the
meridian; and a seismograph, that
records earthquake shocks. This
seismograph recently recorded the
disturbance during the earthquake
in Italy.
The visitors will be permitted to
observe the moon through a 12 1-2
inch telescope. Through this tele-
scope, which is so powerful that
only a small part of the moon can
be seen at one time, they will be
shown the portion of the moon
most, varied in surface features.
Mountains may be seen on the
moon which approach 20,000 feet in
height.
A particular feature wlich always
interests visitors ,Prof. W. C. Rufus
asserts, is the view of mountain
peaks on the moon illuminated by

the rising sun while valleys remain
in the shadow. The moon craters
and so-called seas will also be
pointed out.

7ated Press)
"What causes the seasons of the
year?"
"Name four anthropoid (man-
like) apes."
"What is the function of Leuco-
cytes?"
"What did Lewis and Clarke do?"
"In what countries are the Taj
I Mahal, Johannesburg, Mandalay,
Lake Titcaca, Monte Carlo, Oslo,
Khyber Pass, Danzig?"
"What authors created Tom Saw-
yer, Desdemona, Mulvaney, Dauber,
Nicholas Nickleby, D'Artagan?"
"What were Thor, Appollo, Tris-i
tram, Siegreid, Oberon, Robin I
Hood?"
"From what source or sources are
derived aluminum, ambergis, as-
bestos, bakelite, brass, chocolate,
felt, glass, rayon, turpentine?" '
"What connection has salt with
the present revolutionary move-
ment in India?"
"What are Joseph Stalin, Aristide
Briand, Primo de Rivera?"
"What was the purpose of the re-
cent international conference in
London?"
COMMUNIST MOBS
I lTIIF RAVA~iFR

'POLICE HOLD NEW
Miss Mansell to be Questioned
as Sweetheart of Licavoli,
Key Man in Case.
KLEIN EXPLAINS ACTION,

(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, Aug. 1.-Police today Chinese Marauders Leave City
arrested Marjorie Mansell, 21, radio C inngaRuinrs arc
entertainer for station WMBC, and Smoking Ruin as March
held her at the women's detention Is Continued.
home for questioning later in the
day in connection with the slaying f JAPAN ENTERS PROTEST
of Gerald E. "Jerry" Buckley, polit-
ical commentator for the same sta- (By Associated Press)
tion. SHANGHAI, Aug. 1.-Bred by the
Miss Mansell was arrested on torch applied recently to Changsha,
East Grand 'Blvd. at Helen Ave. communism reared its red head to-
near an alleged hangout for hood- day in Hankow, Kiukiang, Kuling,
lums in which four men were taken and Shanghai, with agitation es-
in a police raid Thursday night. pecially directed against foreigners.
Police said she is a sweetheart of Precautions were taken to pre-
PetLicavoli,notorio ggstrvent repetition of the outrage which
sought as the "key man" in the destroyed much property of for-
Buckley slaying. Police said they eigners and forced them to flee to
had known Miss Mansell was driv- their warships at Changsha. When
.iLicavoli's automobile, which[ the Hunan province capital was
in looiavl uom ~~ted uan burned with the assa s
later was found on East Grand lae n.bre ihteassi
Blvd., in front of the house in nation of natives.
which the radio entertainer lived. Leaving Changsha smoldering to-
John A. Klein, motion picture day, thousands of reds advanced
operator, today offered his explana- toward the prize cities, Hankow,
tion of the peculiar position of two Wuchang, and Hanyang, avid for
chairs in the lobby of the La Salle further spoils. Thousands of terri-
hotelwheeheitingfied natives, bearing their goods,
Buckley when the later was slain.i poured into foreign districts of
Bthose cities, seeking protection.
Klein was the last man to see Hurriedly erecting d e f e n s e s
Buckley alive. He and the announc' against nearby marauding armies,
er were seated side by side when government officials declared mar-
tch irsthree gunmen entered. Their tial law to prevent treason ,within
chairs were out in the lobby and the city. The populace, under threat
away from other pieces of furni-i of death, was warned t, * leave the
ture. The police for a time based d streets by midnight.
their investigation on the unusual Unsatiated by several days loot-
arrangement of the chairs. ing, other Reds were reported hold-
Klein said he entered the hotel .ing ruined Changsha despite gov-
an hour before the shooting. Elmer! ernment assertions a National gun-
Jolly, the house detective, was seat- b o a t had driven them out with
ed in a chair 20 feet from the desk. shells. Sixty provincial officers,
The other chairs were piled on one hunted from hiding places, were
side while scrubwomen were at executed and 300 wealthy natives
work. In response to an invitation seized for ransom.
from Jolly, Klein said he selected Forewarned of a demonstration
a chair from the group and joined by 500 student agitators within the
him: Presently Jolly left to make foreign settlement at Shanghai,
his rounds of the hotel and soon foreign police last,night, using clubs,
after Buckley sat down in the un- repulsed the Reds and arrested 50

I I

ICELAND NEXT HOP
IN TRANS-OCENIC
JUMP BY_ GERMAN
Hirth and Weller Find Weather
Just Right for Second
Hurdle of Flight.
LEFT ORKNEY AT 8 A. M.
Improvised Island Landiiag Will
Greet Intrepid Dutch
Air Adventurers.
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
REYJAVIK, Iceland, Aug. 1-
Two young German airmen,
following by air the sea route
from Northern Europe to the
new world once traversed by
long ships of the Vikings land-
ed here at 7:30 p.m. today (3:30
p.m., e. s. t.) completing a flight
from the Orkney islands.
In their single motored mon-
oplane the two aviators, Wolf-
gang Hirth and Oscar Weller,
made their over-water jump in
a little less than 12 hours. They
left Kirkwall, Orkney islands at
9:40 a.m., British Summer time,
(3:40 a.m., e. s.t).
(By Associated Press)
KIRKWALL, Orkney Islands, Aug.
1.-Wolfram Hirth and Oscar Well-
er, Germany's trans-Atlantic air
adventurers, today hopped off from
Kirkwall on their first over-water
jump toward the American conti-
nent. Their immediate destination
was Iceland.
The takeoff from this point was
encouraging. Weather conditions
were ideal.
Forecast Favorable
Hirth left Kirkwall at 8:15 a. m.
for Swanbister bay where the plane
awaited him, fueled and ready for
the start. Weller remained at Kirk-
wall to await favorable weather
news.
Fifteen minutes after his mate
departed Weller received the fore-
cast. His face beamed. "It couldn't
be better," he exclaimed. Another
moment and the flyer was on his
way to Swanbister by motorcar.
The plane ran smoothly down the
field almost to the edge of the bay.
The airport is small but was suf-
ficient for the takeoff.
Greenland Next Stop
The last seen of the Germans
was a small black dot low over the
northern horizon, near the hills of
Hoy island, where the aviators took
their bearings for the run to Ice-
land.
The flyers expected to reach Ice-
[and tonight. Greenland would be
the next stop and Labrador their
first glimpse of the new world, with
a landing either at Ilopedale or
Indian bay.
BASEBALL SCORES
American League
Detroit 12, Chicago 4
New York 4, Boston 1
Cleveland 6, St. Louis 3
Only games scheduled.
National League
New York 10, Boston 4
Brooklyn 9, Philadelphia 4
St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 1
Chicago 10, Pittsburgh 7

SCIENTIST SAYS
GREEKS BEGAN
OURFASHIONS
(By Associated Press)I
CHICAGO, August 1. - Dr.
David M. Robinson of Johns
Hopkins university has made the
interesting discovery that B. C.
Greeks 'were not above "neck-
ing," that they used face rouge,
that they had shower baths, and
bathtubs, and that they even
laughed at comic strips.
Dr. Robinson, professor of
archeology at Johns Hopkins,
made his observations at Uni-
versity of Chicago Thursday. He
has just returned from Olyn-
phus, Greece, where important
excavations were made.
"Olynphus was at the height
of its glory about 300 ,B. C.," he1
said. "In its two-story resi-l
dences each bedroom had an ad-
joining bath with an overhang-1
ing urn which served as a show-I
er. A slave would pour water(
into thedurn while the master
stood under it.I
"Compacts we have found ,
compared with the present dayi
vanity case, and sculpturing re-1
vealed the Greeks in 'necking' i
poses."
The "comic strip artist," Dr.-
Robinson explained, molded his
comedy characters and was re-
warded by coins thrown to himr
as he paraded through the com-z
rnunity.f
'ARTHUR WILLIAMSi
WINS ED1ISON PRIZEt
Rhode Island Youth to Receive.
Four Year College Course >
Without Expense.
MYLCHREEST IS SECONDt
(By Associated Press)Y
WEST ORANGE, N. J., Aug. 1.-i
Arthur 0. Williams, jr., of East 1
Providence, R. I., was chosen today
by Thomas A. Edison from among
the "Brightest Boys" from everyr
state to receive the inventors' sec-
ond annual college scholarship. ~
Mr. Edison announced the win-v
ner of the scholarship to the as-
sembled 49 contestants on the lawnt
of his home this morning.
Arthur was selected as having
made the best answers to questionss
propounded Thursday in a written
examination taken by the boys, at
the Edison laboratories. The selec-
tion was made Thursday night by
Mr. Edison and an advisory com-
mittee, including Henry Ford and
Harvey S.. Firestone.l
The Rhode Island boy's victory
means he will receive a four-year
technological and scientific course
in any college or university.
G. Dudley Mylchreest, another
New' Englander from Hartford,e
Conn., received the second highesto
average in the questionnaire.-
Gordon K. Burns of Maplewood,t
N. J., ranked,third.c
De Wolf Schatzel of Findlay, O.,
was fourth and Frederick C. Roop',
from the district of Columbia, fifth.'
Honorable"mention was given to 1
James H. Compton, jr., Wichita, ,
Kan.; Walter Wrigley, Haverill,'
Mass., Royal Peake, Detroit; Charles 1
Clonkey, Lansdowne, Pa., and Gor-
don K. Carter, Charlottesville, Va.

ENGLISH DIIIBLE
ENDS AIR JOURNEY
DESPITE ACCIDENT
R-100 Reaches St. Hubert Port
Slightly Damaged From
Cyclonic Current.
DISASTER WAS AVERTED
Giant Airship Ties Up at Mast
Closing Epic 3,500-Mile
Trip From England.
(By Associated Press)
ST. HUBERT AIRPORT, Mon-
treal, Aug. 1.-The British dirigible
R-100 a sailor home from the sea,
swung gently from her mooring
mast tonight, behind her 3,500
miles of epic voyage that almost
ended in disaster.
Speeding down the St. Lawrence
river valley last night, just 150 miles
from St. Hubert mast and safety,
the night air voyager was struck
by a clyconic current that hurled
it 2,500 feet straight' upward and
tore a great hole in her fragile ar-
mour. The damage was repaired
and the big ship proceeded slowly
into Montreal, anchoring at her
mast at 4:38 a. m., just 78 hours
and 51 minutes after taking off
from Cardington, Eng., on her flight
to the new world.
Officers Deny Danger.
Officers, told that they were talk-
ing for publication, made light of
the danger encountered. The men,
not so constrained, spoke more
freely.
Their story was one to make the
heart quicken with thanksgiving
for the 'peril that was passed, a
peril that struck with the speed
and ferocity of a serpent.
Just the other side of Quebec,
they said, a strong up-current of
clyconic force caught the R-100 and
hurled it practically standing on
its nose, for almost 2,500 feet in
less than a half minute.
Storms Rip Fabric.
It was during that terrific mo-
ment, when all aboard just crossed
their fingers and waited, that a
strip of fabric about 15 by 6 feet
was ripped from the port fin, open-
ing a hole as big as a barn door in-
to the great envelope, exposing the
intricate interior of the largest air-
ship ever built to the fury of the
storm.
WOODCOCK PLANS
NEW DRY POLICY
Relieving of Docket Is Sought
by Dropping Liquor Cases.
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Aug, .--Prohibi-
tion director Amos W. W. Woodcock,
expects the new enforcement policy
of concentrating up the large scale
violators of the dry laws to con-
tribute incidentally to the relief of
congestion in the federal courts.
This, he said today, should come
about through the elimination of
the, flood of minor cases that have
been clogging the dockets. Even
with an increased staff of agents,
he predicted fewer. cases would be
brought in the court.
The cases that are prosecuted,
however, he pointed out, may be

expected to be of importance and a
step in the bureau's program of
shutting off the supply of illicit
liquor at its source.
The line of demarcation between
petty and major offenses is to be
sharply drawn. Carrying a pint of
liquor on the hip and transporting
10 gallons in an automobile, Wood-
cock said, are two altogether dif-
ferent things.. Woodcock spent the
day conferring with the group lead-
ers of the corps of special agents
assigned to special investigation
work and detect widespread con-
spiracies to violate the liquor laws.
In addition he spoke briefly to the
12 supervisors of industrial alcohol
permits, -who met here with their
chief, James M. Doran, on ques-
tions of organization, and adminis-
tration. Today's conference brought
to an end the series begun early in
the week which were intended .to
acquaint the field director of the

f

occupied chair.
The announcer had just finshed
broadcasting the returns of the
election which recalled M a y o r
Bowles and the .two men discussed
the event casually, Klein said. Sud-
denly there were shots.
Two Endurance Planes
Reach Half Way Mark
(By Associated Press)
ROOSEVELT FIELD, N. Y., Aug.
1.-Bob Black and Lou Reichers in
their red monoplane reached the
half way mark at 8:30 a. m. (east-
ern standard time) today in their,
attempt to break the 554-hour re-
fueling endurance record of the
Hunter brothers.
(By Associated Press)
ST. LOUIS, Aug. 1.-The mono-
plane Greater St. Louis, flying to-
ward a new refueling endurance
record, passed its 264th hour of sus-
tained flight at .7:11 a. m. today.
At that. hour the pilots, Dale Jack-
son and Forest O'Brine, former
record holders, began their twelfth

The adjacent French concession,
reared barbed wire defenses, while
enlarged patrols closed and guard-
ed 10-foot iron gates of screen
leading to the native city. Machine
guns were manned.
Information that Japanese con-
sular officials had been instructed
to protest against the Changsha in-
cident reserving the right to de-
mand indemnities for losses Japan-
ese suffered there, brought this
comment from Foreign Minister
Wang at Nanking.
"The nationalist government will
hold itself fully responsible for the
regrettable occurences at Chang-
sha.
Our'eather .M aI
fl w-
(By Associated Press;
Brings the sad news that Satur-

European Police Prepare for Demonstrations
by Reds' After Anti-War Day Observance
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, Aug. 1. - The police of officials expected no trouble -here..
Europe stood ready today to pre- They were- less confident as to
vent disorder following the observ- peace in the 'northern industrial
ance of "International Anti-War areas of the country, where thou-
Day" by Communists. , sands are on strike.
In Paris the battalions of muni- The Spanish government ordered
cipal gendarmes were reinforced by police and civil guards to be ready
2,000 republican guards, both to check demonstrations and pre-
mounted and afoot, who were post-. vent the distribution of subversive
ed at strategic points. literature. The police expected no
The police also got an early jump violence, since they said that Spain
on the Reds by making nearly 200 has few Communists, but they were
"preventive arrests," thereby lock- alert because of' the recent arrest
ing up for the day those suspected of Communists in Paris charged
as trouble-makers. Among those i with planning a Red movement in
arrestedr was Florimond Bonte, Spain.
managing' editor of Humanite, Com Budapest police Thursday arrest-
munist newspaper. ed 44 leading Communists 'of the:
Premier Tardieu forbade parades, city as a preventive measure.

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