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June 01, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1930 THE SUMMR MIofIGAN DAILY

,,

PRO0FESSOR GOULD'
OUTLINES HISTORY'
OF ANTARCTIC TRIP
Michigan Scientist Describes
Work and Accomplishments
of Byrd Expedition.

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SUBSCRIBE TO THE DAI Y, $1050,
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REPORTS

DISCOVERIES

Lauds Part Played by Airplane
and Radio, New Factors
in Exploration.

SPORTS

RESSEs

Associate P r o fes sor Lawrence
Gould of the Department of Ge-
ology, senior scientist and second
in command of the Byrd Antarc-
tic expedition addressed the alum-
ni of the University and the resi-
dents of Ann Arbor at Hill Audi-
torium last Wednesday, 8 p. m. and
sketched for them the conditions
of life with the expedition. "The
radio and the airplane were the
two new factors in polar explora-
tion", said Prof. Gould, "and the
advantages these gave the Byrd
expedition were apparent from
the very start. During the course
of this expedition we were in daily
contact with the outside world".
The expedition officially travelled
35,000 miles whereas in fact they
actually covered some 90,000.
"The problem in the Antarctic is
not so much of keeping warm as of
keeping dry. Wind proof clothing
made from airplane fabric suffices
to keep out the wind which is often
so strong that one may as easily
lean against it as against a solid
wall. The coldest weather we ex-
perienced," said Prof. Gould, "was
seventy-four ' elow zero and in
this weather one can hear the
weird musical whistling sound of
the freezing of exhaled breath. On
a 'sled journey in the antarctic
every person is expected to look
back at his companion every_ few
minutes and warn hinm if his face
has frozen for the victim does not
notice it himself. Ice must must
not be rubben. on the frozen part,"
declared Professor Gould warn-
ing against the erroneous common
belief to the contrary, "it may
prove very harmful indeed to do
so. Placing the naked warm hand
will bring back circulation and life
more successfully.
"We were the most healthy and
best fed expedition that ever ex-
plored the polar regions," said
Prof. Gould, "not only were we well
supplied with local delicacies such,
as delicious young whale meat but
seal, penguin and generous quan-
titles of dehydrated vegetables.

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FOR

WOMEN AND

MISSES

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1000 fresh new sports frocks, just emerging from their New York wrap-
pings-now you can have a different dress for every occasion, because
famous manufacturers have sent us the season's smartest styles at a price
much less than usual-for this exciting event in our Summer Dress
Demonstration. Look at these ready for action, and more eager arrivals
coming in every day! Shantung, striped shirting, pique, cottons, pastel
crepes-it's an exciting collection at an exciting price.

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lit.

$

16i

Descriptions

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a. "~Candy Stripe" - this year's
tennis frock in woven striped
silk ....................$16.75
b. Tennis Shorts" - worn with
a detachable skirt, of silk .. x$16.75
C. "'First Hole"--golf frock' of
washable silk in pale pastels or
white ..................$16.75
d. "Rudder"-short-sleeved sports
frock of cotton ..........x$16.75
e. "Stripes"a youthful dress of
striped shirting ..........i$16.75
f. '"Binoculars"-a spectator sports
frock of flat crepe ........x$16.75
g. "'Onlooker" -- distinguished by
horizontal tucks and v e r t i c a l
seams .... . . ... $16.75

75

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qflingerle operated
restaurants wish to
announce that the
arcade cafeteria will
be open during Sum-
mier,
Cgthe service will be
on monday-tuesday-
wednesday- thurs-

day and friday each
week. luncheon at

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eleven until one--din-

ner at
seven.

five until

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fit,

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Clexcelient food at
reasonable prices for
eleven years -" meal
tickets at five dol-
lars for five fifty val-
ue In food.

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Cacquire the habit
of eating the fliingerle
operated way.

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Second Floor--Dress Section

6J.

Phone 4161

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