100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 27, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1930

ri g 0icunmtr
ublished every morning except Monday
ring the University Summer Session by
eBoard in Control of Student Publications.
T'he Associated Press is exclusively en.
ed to the use for republication of all news
patches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news
blished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan.
stoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $ .5o; by mail,

ies: Press Building, Maynard
Arbor, Michigan.

Street,

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GURNEY WILLIAMS
Editorial Director .........Howard F. Shout
City Editor ........... Harold Warren, Jr.
Women's Editor.......Dorothy Magee
Music and Drama lditor.. William J. Gorman
Books Editor.......... Russell E. McCracken
Sports Editor................Morris Targer
Night Editors
Denton Kunze Howard F. Shout
Powers Moulton Harold Warren, Jr.
Assistants
Dorothy Adams Cornelius H. Beukema
Eelen Carrm Bertha Clayman
Bruce Manley Sher M. Quraishi
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
GEORGE A. SPATER
Assistant Business Managers
illiam R. Worboys Harry S. Benjamin
Circulation Manager......... Bernard Larson
Secretary ................Ann W. Verner
Amistants
oyce Davidson Dorothy Dunlap
Lelia M. Kidd
SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1930
Night Editor-Denton Kunze
NEWSPAPERS AND JOURNALS 1
The difference between a jour-
aalist and a newspaperman would:
seem to be negligible from a con-
sideration of the terms themselves;
so also the difference between a
aewspaper and a journal. Never-
theless, there is a wide gulf both
of purposes and practices between
the two. As William Preston Bea-
sell pointed out in a late article,
the function of the latter is "the
merchandising of news, its first
page the show window, and its
columns the counters on which the
widest possible array of goods is
displayed." The journal, on the
ther hand, emphasizes its editori-
al matter and depends on pareful
thought rather than sensational in-I
terest to maintain its circulation.I
Not more than half a century
ago, the modern newspaper had its
birth. Previous to that time the
ournal, as we have defined it, was
he accepted publication. In the,

What's
Going
On
July 28-August 2.
MONDAY
4:00 p. m.-Educational Confer-
ence-ETHICAL AND UNETHICAL
PRACTICES IN THE MARKETING
OF TEXTBOOKS. Dean J. B. Ed-
monson. Auditorium, University
High school.
5:00 p. m.-Lecture-THE MICH-
IGAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXPE-
DITION IN MESOPOTAMIA (Il-
lustrated). Prof. Leroy Waterman.
Natural Science auditorium.
7:00 p. m.-Meeting-Men's Edu-
cational club, third floor, Union.
7:15 p. m. -Meeting-Women's
Educational Club. Speaker: Prof.
Cleo Murtland. League.
At the Theatres.
Lydia Mendelssohn: "Pan Pipes
and Donkeys' Ears", by the Tatter-
man Marionettes. 8:15 p. m.
Michigan: "All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Majestic: Richard Dix in "Lovin'
the Ladies."
Wuerth: "The Benson Murder
Case" with William Powell.
TUESDAY
4:00 p. m.-Educational Confer-
ence-THE CHILD IN THE EDU-
CATIONAL MACHINE. Prof. Fran-
cis B. Haas, President, State Teach-
ers College, Bloomsburg, Penn.
Auditorium, University High school.
5:00 p. m. - Lecture-BRITISH
POLITICS IN TRANSITION. Prof.
James K. Pollock, Jr. Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
8:00 p. m.-Concert-Mr. Guy
Filkins, organist, and Mr. Stanley
Fletcher, pianist, of the School of
Music. Hill auditorium.
At the Theatres.
Michigan: "All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Majestic: "Lovin' the Ladies."
Wuerth: Blanche Sweet in "The
Woman Racket."
WEDNESDAY
4:00 p. m.-Educational Confer-
ence-EFFECTIVE SCHOOL AND
EDUCATIONAL LEGISLATION. Dr.
Wm. G. Carr, Assistant Director,
Research Division, Natural Educa-
tion Association. University High
school auditorium.
5:00 p. m.-Lecture-THE EARLY
MODERN ENGLISH DICTIONARY.
Prof. Charles C. Fries. Natural
Science auditorium.
At the Theatres.
Lydia Mendelssohn: Eugene O'-
Neill's "Beyond the Horizon" by
the Michigan Repertory Players.
Michigan: "All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Majestic: "Is Everybody Happy?"
with Ted Lewis.
Wuerth: "Woman Racket."
THURSDAY
5:00 p. m. -Lecture -CAUSES
AND PREVENTION OF FIRES IN
RESIDENCES (Illustrated). Mr.
Gordon L. Jensen. Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
At the Theatres.
Lydia Mendelssohn: "Beyond the
Horizon." Michigan Repertory
Players.
Michigan: "All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Majestic: "Is Everybody Happy?"
Wuerth: "The Woman Racket."
FRIDAY

At the Theatres. .
Lydia Mendelssohn: "Beyond the
Horizon."
Michigan: "All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Majestic: "Is Everybody Happy?"
Wuerth: Gary Cooper and Fay
Wray in "The Texan."
SATURDAY
7:00 a. m.-EXCURSION NO. 7.
--Put-in-Bay, Lake Erie, under the
direction of Prof. William H. Hobbs.
Via bus to Detroit and steamer to
Put-in-Bay . Reservations in Room
9, University hall. Return to Ann
Arbor at 10 p. m.
At the Theatres.
Lydia Mendelssohn: Last show-
ing of "Beyond the Horizon" by the
Michigan Repertory Players.
Michigan: Last showing of "All
Quiet on the Western Front."
Majestic: Lon Chaney in "The
Unholy Three."
Wuerth: "The Texan."

USICAND DRAMA
MONDAY: 8:15 in the Mendelssohn
Theatre, William Duncan and Ed-
ward Mabley present The Tatter-
man Marionettes in "Pan Pipes
and Donkey's Ears, an original
play based on Greek mythology by
Catherine Reighard.
* * *
PUPPETRY
Gordon Craig, with that amazing
faculty of his for stirring things up,
is pretty largely responsible for the
recent renascence of interest in
the puppet-show in the English-
speaking worlds. His enthusiasm
expresed itself in a magazine en-
titled "Marionette," publishing ev-
erything of interest connected with
puppetry. This enthusiastic ven-
ture was suspiciously in harmany
with many of Craig's other revolu-
tionizing dictates about theatrical
art. Craig had a distrust of the
actor's art born of the realization
that its importance was stifling the
art of scenic design in which he is
supreme. Some of his most beau-
tiful productions have resulted in
a disproportion with the tables
turned. It was quite natural for
him to turn to marionettes as the
ideal figures. He has many inter-
esting things to say: "Marionettes,
are men without egotism ... They
are even unaware that we see
them, a delightful innocence to be
found nowhere on a stage filled by
humans... Being egoists, men best
interpret themselves; marionettes
can interpret other things. I real-
ly cannot take them seriously
enough; if there is- a solemn thing
in life only a marionette can in-
terpret it."
This is rather startling news to
most of us who had thought of the
activity of a puppeteer as rather
like turning the crank of a hand-
organ, with the entertainment de-
rived on a somewhat similar level.
Puppetry, sophisticated Americans
thought, was child-play to be
watched with indulgent eyes. Buti
aesthetically, there is a good deal
of truth in Craig's dictum. From
a certain viewpoint the puppet
does make a good ideal for the hu-
man actor to strive to approximate.
It is a mechanism obeying not the
accidents of physiologic and psy-
chologic disturbances that often
upset the careful plans of a direc-
tor but the will of the one creator,
the puppeteer. It certainly has no
affectations, no effervescent per-
sonality to bubble for an audience.
The self-consciousness that plays
havoc with natural grace in hu-
mans is eliminated.
But more seriously, there is the
fact that the life of the puppet is a
function of acting. In the aesthetic
experience of a puppet-show the
concept of acting is taken for
granted and we concentrate on the
life-expression. In the aesthetic
to project, and are fascinated by
lIWe-exp'ression. In the aesthetic
experience of a play with humans,
the concept of life, because it is an
inevitable asset of the actor, is
taken for granted and we look for
acting with its trade-tricks and
judge the performance largely with
the concept of acting in mind. The
puppet's achievement is that of

living by means of acting; that is,
the fusion of the two concepts,
whichushould certainly be the aim
of all human actors.
* * *
In 1928, seven books about mari-
onettes appeared in the United
States, an eloquent bit of evidence
that a lively revival is at hand.
There are at least fifteen profes-
sional traveling companies in
America. Tony Sarg's that appear-
ed here last winter is perhaps the
most famous.
But the Tatterman marionettes,
appearing tomorrow night in the
Mendelssohn Theatre, have gained
quite as solid- a reputation and in-
deed possesses a more striking rep-
ertory. Tony Sarg has almost con-
fined himself to reworking child-
ren's fantasies. The Tatterman
Marionettes under Mabley and
Duncan have dramatised one of
Arthur Morrison's short stories,
used a story of Boccacio's, and have
presented short interludes from the
Japanese Theatre.
Miss Catherine Reighard, a for-
mer Michigan student, has done six
full-length plays for them. One
of them, Pan Pipes and Donkey's
Ears, based on Greek mythology,
will be the offering tomorrow
night. Their apeparance here last
summer session was one of the
mnkot atractive events of the sear

v.:
.. ....

$r+.
N~u
'.r 4r ~

j

a brief pause
for station
announcement

:,

I- %-

, NO%
.
c'
s
w

Driin
Delicious nd Refreshing

II

the
tPause,
that refreshes
Stand byeverybody! forCoca-Cola broadcast-
ing a program of delicious refreshment from
every ice-cold glass and bottle. Operating
on a frequency of nine million drinks a day.
The hap p est, shortest cut to refreshment is
the brie pause for Coca-Cola. The drink that
tunes in with all places, times, occasions and
moods. The easiest-to-take setting-up exer-
cise eyer invented, while its delightful, tin-
gling taste will provide you with one of
life's great moments.
The Co.ae.-CaComp ayAdang Cv..

,I

>I

MILLION
a day

aCW4,
I T I S

IT H A D TO 3 n6 0 03

TO G E T W E U R

it y.
Jl i-

You can break
aWa~terman's.

days of Franklin, Bennett, and
Greeley the reading public bought
its penny papers for the' purpose
of finding out what the learned
editors had to tell them, something
on the idea of the Spectator Pa-
pers. Few of these remain today;
perhaps the Adrian Telegraph and
William Allen White's Emporia
Gazette are the only survivors.
They have been replaced by huge
newspaper chains, fed by inter-
national news services, and cater-
ing to the public desire for quick,
easy reading. The result has been
that the power of the press has in-
creased until it controls the beliefs
and actions of the people almost
entirely, but it has failed to bring
to them anything constructive on
which, to build their progress, it
has failed to be the educational
force that it might have been, it
has been satisfied to degeneratel
into a public servant instead of
making itself a public guide and
control. These charges have been
entered against the press before,
and it has heeded them to a cer-
tain extent.
The science service which has
been inaugurated is a step in the
ight direction; the providing of
space for the printing of public
opinion is another. So also might
we mention the increased amount
>f attention paid to political news,
o the furtherance of the interests
)f aviation, and to health informa-
ion.
The cycle is being completed and
he reaction toward the old type
Af journal is gradually beginning.
[his -is being encouraged to a cer-
ain extent by our university
chools of journalism and by stu-
lent newspapers. The pioneer
work of the London Times and The
Jew York Times in this direction
as had its influence, and the scat-
,ering of independents, small but
owerful, has had some effect. It
night almost be said to be assured
hat another decade will find a new
ype of newspaper which will be a
owerful factor in education, equal-
d only, perhaps, by the radio. The
eturn will be made to a type of
ews-conveyor closely akin to the
urnal of a former day, but Im-

you can't har
every purpo:
pen is intent
tions 100%.
Sons for thisl
The holder of every Wate
-the all-satisfying mater
is stainless, strong, light,
From the tip of the 14-ca
ing top of the cap ever
balanced. It fills easily,i
In fact, it is the ideal col
through your course an
afterward.
k aterman's has the newest and most appeali

with a
Sledge

rm it with hard work. For
se for which a fountain
ded, a Waterman's func
Here are a few of the rea.
etter perfect performance;
rman's is made of hard rubber
rial for the purpose because it
and feels good in the hand.
rat gold pen point to the shin.
y Waterman's is scientifically
rapidly, and holds a lot of ink.
lege pen for it will serve you all
Ld still be in use many years

ing idea

in Fountain Pens. You can select the type of pen
point that suits your handwriting by a color band on
the cap of each pen. You can get a pen that writes
like Tom Brown's by asking for the same color,
which is stamped on the pen point as well. Ask
for it where you buy your supplies.

The. wr6 oen iHe yl.
cots d es. U ettasiu

CAMPUS OPINION
Inasmuch as the discourses
which have been invoked by a
letter recently addressed to the
engineers by an individual sign-
ing himself as J. W. S. have be-
come so numerous and lengthy,
it has been decided to discon-
tinue publishing them. Lack of
space makes this policy impera-

Priced to match all pocketbooks and
guaranteed forever against all defects

terma~ns

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan