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July 20, 1929 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-20

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T 2 WEATHER
Generally fair with rising
temperatures.

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MEMBER OF THt
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. X, NO. 23

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1929

PRICE FIVE CENTS

-

TWO UNIVERSITY MEN
NAMED FOR CHICAO
WORLD'SFAIR GROUP
WHITE AND HICKEY ACCEPT
POSITIONS ON NATIONAL
SCIENCE COMMITTEE
WILL BE HELD IN 1933
Advisory Committee of Council
Was Formed at Dawes' Request;
Has Science Leaders
Michigan will be represented by
two professors from the University
on the National Research Council
Advisory Committee to the Cen-
tury of Progress, Chicago world's
fair which will be held in 1933. Prof.
A. H. White of the department of
chemical engineering and Prof.
Preston M. Hickey of the medical
school, have accepted the invita-
tion of Dr. Frank B. Jewett of New
York, chairman of the advisory
committee, to become members of
the general committee.
Formed at the request of the ex-
position trustees of which Rufus C.
Dawes is president, the National
Research council, as the recognized
national scientific organization in
the United States, appointed an ad-
visory committee to aid them in
the organization of the science fea-
tures of the exposition. The Ad-
visory Committee as now constitut-
ed is made up of the.foremost lead-
ers in all fields of pure and applied
science.
Has Started Work
Maurice Holland, executive sec-
retary of the Advisory Committee,
has announced that the committee
will endeavor to draft a plan for
presentation to the trustees of the
exposition whereby a century 01
progress may be depicted in rela-
tion to pure and applied science,
in a simple and graphic manner.
The committee has started work
and will coordinate its ideas into
a central plan at meetings to be
held in the early fall.
The exposition accoring to pres-
ent plans will be of a totally dif-
ferent character from any inter-
national exposition heretofore held.
The progress of science in industry
during the past century will be
the dominant note of the exposi-
tion.
Noted Members
Dr. Jewett in presenting the pro-
ject to the members of the Com-
mittee at the first meeting held
recently in New York, indicated
one possible form the plan might
take, using as an illustration the
contribution and influence of
science in the development of the
communications field.
The members of the executive
committee are: Dr. Frank B. Jewett,
New York, chairman; Gano Dunn,
New York; Prof. M. I. Pupin, New
York; Dr. William Allen Pusey,
Chicago; Dr. George K. Burgess,
and Dr. Vernon Kellogg of Wash-
ington, D. C.; and Maurice Hol-
land, executive secretary of the
committee.

Temporary headquarters have
been established for the Advisory
committee in New York City.
FORRER TO SPEAK
AT CONVOCATION
At the first Student Christian
Association convocation of the.
summer session in the Lydia Men-,
delssohn Theater of the Women's;
League Building, Dr. Samuel Forrer
from Erie, Pa., will be the speaker.
Dr. Forrer's subject is, "The Secret
of Victory."
Dr. Forrer is the author of az
number of books, a scholar and 1
a very interesting and stimulating{
speaker. He graduated from Prince-t
ton and holds the degrees of P. H.
Tt ...A t Ph

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WAR AREA

1i -E
~Hy2TN~: 4i 1,
KACHURI4
r r SASNG
NARBIN
t'IRAICIIIVAIA
/ . MOUtKDEN /
Map of the Manchurian war dis-
trict. Soviet troops are reported
to have crossed the Amur river and
to be proceeding south. Fighting
is expected at the towns of Man-
churia and Pogranichinaya, rail-
road terminals.
McCollum, Foremost Authority,
Says Eat First What You Have
To; Then What You Want

DR, FISK SOLICITS
PHYSICIANS' AID
IN HEALTH WORK
DR. CARL BUCK TO PRESIDE AT
MID-SUMMER MEETING
OF ASSOCIATION
ANNOUNCE DAY'S PROGRAM
Vaughan, Kiefer, Hirschman Speak
at Combined Meeting of Health
Institute
f Because of the spread in the cus-
tom of periodic health examina-
tions, the percentage of physical
defects discovered has risen grad-
ually in recent years according to
Dr. Eugene Fisk of the Metropoli-
tan Life Insurance Co., New York
City. In his lecture yesterday aft-
ernoon before the fifth Public
Health Institute Dr. Fiske declared
that public health work will occu-
py a larger portion of the physi-
cian's attention in the future than
it has in the past."
"There should be no conflict or
antagonism between the doctor and
public health organizations. Pub-
lic health work ought to receive the
wholehearted support of the doc-
tor even if only his personal eco-
nomic viewpoint is considered," he
Istated.

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~- IFisk to Talk Again
GIVES SATISFACTORY DIET Dr. Fisk will conclude his dis-
cussion on "Periodic health exami-
No nation in the world is the nation" this afternoon at the mid-
equal of the United States in the summer meeting of the Michigan
number of cases of indigestion was Public Health Association which is
the opinion of Dr. E. V. McCollum, being combined with the Public
most outstanding authority in the Health Institute today.
world on nutritional research and Dr. Carl Buck, President of the
at the present time director of Michigan Public Health Association
laboratories in this field at Johns will preside. The first speaker on
Hopkins University, Baltimore, the program, Dr. S. C. Moore, Com-
Maryland. There is no need, how- missioner of Health, Wexford Coun-
ever, to be too frightened over this; ty Health Unit, Cadillac, lectures
most of the advertisements of tooth- at nine 'o'clock on "Soie Experi-.
paste companies which play up ences in the Organization and Ad-
this phase of ill health contain a ministration of the County Health
great deal of misinformation on Unit." At 10 o'clock Dr. Guy L.
this subject, it was explained. Con- Kiefer, Michigan State Health
sidering an hygienic mouth as the Commissioner, will talk on "Rela-
exponent of correct nutrition, he tionship of Official Health Depart-
cited several cases where a "per- ments, Voluntary Health Agencies."
fect" mouth had existed in persons The commissioner of Public Health,
who had never touched a tooth Detroit, Dr. Henry F. Vaughan
brush. speaks at eleven on "Public Health
Nutrition, nevertheless, in Doc- in Cities."'
tor McCollum's opinion is of espe- Continue After Lunch
cial importance for its effets on After luncheon at the Union Dr.
the mouth and the teeth. For this R. W. Bunting of the University of
reason he has devoted his research Michigan will discuss "The Year's
in the subject to diets and the Progress in Oral Hygiene," at 1:30
parts that these, during prenatal o'clock. Dr. Louis Hirschman, the
stages, play in the dental forma- President of the Michigan Medical
tions of the young. To this end he j Society will talk at 2:15 o'clock on
has evolved an experimental sys- "Relation of the Physician to Pub-
tem to which he subjects pigs in lic Health." At 3:00 o'clock Dr.
a special laboratory in Nelson, Fisk, medical director of the Life
I Maryland, conducted in onjunc- Extension Institute will talk and at
tion with the American Animal as- 4:00 o'clock Dr. E. V. McCollum, ex-
sociation.
Results in general derived from pert in nutritional research from
Rheees ns genalderied fDom- Johns Hopkins University will con-
the experiments conducted in Doc- dlude the session with a lecture on
tor McCollum's laboratories have "Whitheer with the Vitamins."
led him to the conclusion that This is the fifth public health in
there are certain essentials whichstise he onhwpekienhsthugh
man must have for proper nutri- stitute held on week-ends through
man ust avefor ropr nuri-the summer session. These lectur-
tion. "Eat first what you have to;
ers avemade special studies in
after that eat what you want to," is trhave mfields.
his motto. In devising a suitable their __ield_.___
diet satisfactory for the ordinaryC
person he builds his requirements CANADIAN POLICE
about the drinking of one quart of OFFEND TOURISTS
milk a day. This supplies one-third
of the desired calories, the re- (By Associated Press)
mainder of the diet consists of TORONTO, July 20.-Complaints
some sort of cooked greens and a of unfair treatment to automo
salad as the leafy plants are the bile tourists by police in western
most satisfactory supplementary Ontario are to be investigated by
foods. Pastries, which are the Premier Ferguson.
curse of over-civilization, accord- "Instructions have been issued
ing to the lectures, contain too to all highway officers that cour-
much cooked starch which also in- tesy is to be their first considera-
jures the enamel of teeth by ad- tion," he said, "and if they find
hering to it too readily. some one whose only offense is ex-
In talking about the more recent ceeding the speed limit they have
discoveries made in the field of been told to warn him, and do the+
nutrition Doctor McCollum specified courteous thing with him."
that there were 35 chemical prin- The premier said that roadside+
ciples which were necessary; 18 of collection of fines is improper and
these come to form the amino acids. if any officer has improperly im-
Sugar, in one kind alone, is neces- posed a fine and collected money
sary out of the entire glucose the officer will be dealt with and
."..-... t e fi . nfr.n

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POST WAR PROBLEM STORM CENTER CHINA IS WATCHFL
TRACED BY GIERMAN KELLOGG PEACE PACT
EDITOR IN LECTURE OFFERED BY STIMSON
FRENCH AND GERMAN PEOPLE U. S. RELAYS PACT OFFER TO
ARE NOT RACIALLY C BRIAND
MOSCOW BY BIN
ANTAGONISTIC AND CLAUDEL
EUROPE CALLED MUSEUM SOVIET NOT RECOGNIZED
Stern-Rubarth Believes Bad Feeling -sF.ss..........s.FsE r T
DoesNotExis BeweenTwoChinese Foil Russ Troop Effort To
Does Not Exist Between TwoO
War Time Enemies Cross Amur River and Urge
1 f-2 No Arbitration
In his capacity of Editorgin yhiAssfi:.:>Pess
of the Wolff Telegraphic Agency of I \~citclPcs
Ster-Rubrth har-WASHINGTON July 20.-The
Germany, Dr. Stern-Rubarth char-
acterized his outlook on European.Russian and Chinese governments
political activities as by "the on- jhave been reminded by Secretary
looker from the underground." The Stimson of the renunciation of war
subject of his lecture, delivered a
yesterday afternoon in Natural: ash adsrmenctothenKlpoy
Science Auditorium, was the nature through adherence to the Kellogg
of Franco-German relations. treaty.
In prefacing his remarks Dr. George W. Wickersham The action was taken directly
Stern-Rubarth pointed out that Around whom has arisen a storm yesterday with the Chinese minis-
racially the Franks inhabited bothI of protest concerning the letter ter and was communicated to
sides of the Rhine, but that dif- which he sent to Gov. Franklin D. Moscow through the French am-
ferentation had grown up in the Roosevelt, of New York, advocatingb
course of the general westward state control of dry law enforce- bassador Claudel and foreign Min-
development of the race. On the ment. ister Briand in Paris. La Follette
constitutional side he remarked on said the United States does not
France's early unification, in con- recognize the Moscow government.
trast to Germany which had been hIHIVR DIPH TrE i The communication therefore could
unified only some 40 years before i ITnot be sent directly tq him.
the War period. Economical dif- Stimson Sure of Arbitration
ferences he discovered equally wide, L SESecretary Stimson is convinced
with France rich in resources while that the underlying cause of their
Germany, particularly in the East, dispute are of a justifiable nature
was comparatively poor. And in Ten Hoor, Bez, and Kreye Announce and that the matter which has
problems of foreign relationships Acceptance of Positions at arisen between the two countries
he pointed out the diplomatic prin- Other Colleges can be settled by arbitration. Of-
ciple of "playing off" one against ficial circles here received with con-
the other to maintain the balance EATON DEPARTMENT HEAD siderable pleasure the announce-
of power in Europe. E O E T T_ ment made by high officials that
In speaking of the War period, Five members of the faculty ofhe Moscow government will take
which was the consequence of these the German department will not 'the Kellogg Pact into consideration
factors, Dr. Stern-Rubarth asserted return to the University this fall and will avoid war.
that "there is no bad feeling be- three of these having already ac-
tween Germany and France." "The cepted positions at other colleges. SHAFGHAI, July 20.-Private ad-
Man in the Street" he insisted, in- George Ten Hoor has received an vices received here today state that
stead of being hostile, was distinct- assistant professorship at Western Russian troops tried to cross the
ly friendly to his one time enemy. Reserve University at Cleveland Amur river into Manchuria at
Post War Situation Tense and will take over his duties there Elagoveshchensk and were fired
The post-war situation was des- in the fall. p by Chmese troops who forced
cribed first as one of "absolute en- Paul Bez will go to Capitol Uni- them to retire.
mity" under the leadership of versity at Columbus, Ohio, where Si merce ton the Amu
Clemnenceau and Foche who soughthewlhadteG mndpr- Soviet mercantile fleet on the Amur
Clmeceu ndFohewh sugthe will head the German depart- river, Manchuria's northern bound-
the break-up of Germany and the ment. Mr. Bez recently returned iary, was concentrating at Blago-
extension of French frontiers. This from Columbus after securing a vestchensk, whence large bodies of
gave way to the financial de- residence there and conferring with t hs whud e move io Mn
mands of the Poincare regime inthpridt fheclg.Te troops could be moved into Man--
rnans o th Poncae rgim inthe president of the college. The churia down the Sungari river.
which the Ruhr invasion took college is a sectarian institution herame she sate that
place. Thereafter came the Heriot-udrLthrnonr. The same sources stated that
plc.Thrate ae h ero-Iunder Lutheran control. Soviet airplanes were flying over
Briand-Stresseman period of nego- Of the three other faculty mem- Chi nes nrern Man-
iations in which the influence of Chinese territory in northern Man-
hhe United States began to be felt rs who are leaving George Kreye churia and dropping pamphlets
through the Dawes Plan. The fruit will go to ale University where he ugingthe Chinese masses to sup-
Lhrough ~~will act as instructor in addition to u otte oit
f this period was the London Con- crrvin a on w rk towards his doe.

I
T;..''

I

ference of 1924, the Lacarno Pact, 's degree,1HarryA.UGnatkowski
and the enforced entry of Germany intends to Hry A. Enrowhi
intndstotravel in Europe, while'
into the League of Nations. t o r- y

The final period Dr. Stern-
Rubarth believed was only just be-
ginning; the period of settlement.
In this period the influence of the
United States was paramount as a
result of the Owen D. Young plan.
But for the consideration of
the people of the United States
Dr. Stern-Rubarth presented the
"iminent tendency to tear down
economic and political barriers" be-
tween France and Germany which
is the result of this settlement
period.
Two Countries Interdependent
This levelling of barriers he feels
is inevitable because of the econ-
omic interdependence of Germany
and France. Nationalistic barriers
of tariffs cannot survive this in-

ie in en ions of morris cha z
have not as yet been announced.
The German department was re-
organized this spring. Prof. John
W. Eaton of the University of Sas-
katchewan has been chosen chair-
man of the department and will
assume his position here in the fall.
CALLES ACCUSED
IN MURDER CASE
(By Associated Press)
MEXICO CITY, July 20.-Ac-
counts published in Mexico City
newspapers today that Gen. Plut-
arco Elias Calles would leave here
Saturday by train for New York,
passing through Texas en routej
caused surprise in some circles;

Chinese Belligerent
The native papers said that the
local Kuomintang, or Nationalist
political party, committees were
calling upon the Chinese people to
line up behind the government and
not to allow meditation or other
interference by foreign nations.
It was said the Nationalist gov-
ernment would not reply to Mos-
cow's second note, that severing
diplomatic relations between the
two governments.
High officials of the Nationalist
government arriving here today
from Nanking said this govern-
ment would await the next move
by Russia before acting itself.
"Despite Moscow's severance of
relations," he said, "the Soviet re-
mains faced with the responsibility
of making the next move. The Na-
tional government is following a
policy of watchful waiting. Its
leaders do not believe the Soviet
will attempt to regain the Chinese
Eastern by force."

terdependence, once it is realized. where the threat of John A. Valls,
Calling Europe today "a museum former district attorney at Laredo,
of history and civilization," Dr. Tex., to arrest him on a murder'
Stern-Rubarth pointed out that warrant was remembered.
the principle of unionization be- Last August, Valls, who now is a I
tween the two countries was be- judge at Laedo, accused Gen. Cal-
coming realized, had in fact been I les and the late, Gen. Alvaro Obre-
expounded in public speeches by gon of complicity in the assassina-j
M. Briand, and would in his cer- tion of two Mexican army officers!
tain knowledge very soon be given in Laredo in 1922.j
official recognition. Valls said that while Gen. Obre-
In conclusion Dr. Stern-Rubarth , gon's asA-issination had removed
expressed the hope that national the possibility of arresting him,
self consciousness would not be al- "the prosecution against Calles and
lowed to interfere with what would his fellow conspirators will remain
be of immense advantage to the pending, with the fervid hope that
United States both politically and some day they will be called upon

BASEBALL SCORES
(Iy Associated Press)
American League
Philadelphia 4, Detroit 2.
New York 7-3, Cleveland 2-11. -
(Double header.)
Chicago 2, Boston 1.
St. Louis 7, Washington 3.
National League
Games postponed on account -of

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