100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAi[_Y

PuAGM TRUSw

TRaFa STJMMraraF. raaMT(laVTCAW Ail % lrv-- - - - --*4 Y 5&d a aar

NATIONAL FORESTERI,
INSPECT CAMP ROTI
IN UPPERPENINSULI
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS MAK]
FIRE BREAK AROUND
FOREST PRESERVE
EXPLAIN STATE PROGRA1
Construction of Trail to Lookou
Is Included in Improvement
of Wooded Tract
Seven members of the Forest ser-
vice, representing the Forest Sup
ervisor's office at Munising and th
Ruse sub-station of the Lake States
Forest Experiment station visiteC
the University Forestry camp or
July 9, inspecting the work don
by the foresters, and remaining fo
the evening camp fire with it
round of songs and stories.
This camp fire is one of a num
ber planned for the summerschoo
period by Robert Craig, Jr., direc
tor. Visits to these gatherings are
expected from the Munising Ro
tary club, and University alumn
from the surrounding region.
As a part of the work in forest
improvements the students have
located a trail to the Midway look-
out tower, and will probably star
construction work on it next week
They are putting a fire break
around one of the promising for-
est plantations near camp and wil
have a portion of it ready for plow-
ing by the Forest service before
the close of the session. The men
have constructed an apparatus for
measuring the height of trees. It
may also be used in timber esti-
mating problems.
The national forest work in the
Upper Peninsula involves first, ac-
cording to Supervisor William L
Barker, Jr., the acquisition of for-
est lands by the federal govern-
ment. This work is proceeding, un
der the recently passed McNary-
Woodruff law, in three purchase
units well distributed over the Up-
per Peninsula, and including some
of the choicest forest growing land
in the North.
Second in importance is the pro-
tection of acquired lands from fire
which will receive, more attention
as the new areas are blocked up
and put under administration. The
third activity is artificial refores-
tation of areas too badly devasted
to come back naturally. Barker is
enthusiastic about the future of the
Upper Peninsula forests and he ex-
pressed his satisfaction that the
University had chosen this region
for its summer forestry camp.
In explaining the work of the
, se Forest experimental station,
Edwin L. Mowatt emphasized the
qAM of the Forest service to dem-
pnstrate to private forest owners
the best 1methods of cutting and
┬žecpring reproduction in the forest
types which occur in the Upper
Feninsula. The tract under con-
trpi, he said, is big enough for real
experimentation not only in meth-
ods gf cutting but also in applying
swamp forest practices which have
proved Vgluabe in northern Eur-
gpe, Mowtt invitedthe stuents
to Visit the station on July 24 when
they will see experiments inthe
drainage of swamp forest lands in
progress.

MALLOY MAY BE
GOLF KING AGAIN
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT. July 15.-Johnny Mal-
loy, of Ann Arbor, has the oppor-
*nity in the State Golf Tourna-
ment here commencing July 24, to
be Michigan's first golf king to
wear the crown for three succes-
sive years. Two others had like
opportunity in the past--Howard
B. Lee, in 1912, and Carlton Wells
in 1924. a
. James B. Standish was the neme-
sis of both and remains among
the top notchers of Michigan golf
as the possible successor to the title
of Malloy. Wells, Lee and Malloy
are theonly Wolverines to hold the
title in succession and with Stan-
dish, Phil Stanton and L. L. Bredin,
are the men who have held the
state title more than once.
Stanton was the first to break
into the limelight, winning the title
in 1907 after having been runner-
up the first year. Standish fol-
lowed in 1909 or 20 years ago, and
Lee a year later. Bredin entered
the niblick hall of fame in 1919
while Wells won his first title in
1922 and Malloy, after a series of
years as the boy prodigy, ascended
the throne at the beginning of his
nrnt va'ren in 197-

Motor Magnate Writes Two-Cent Checkj

i

r V I - V q 9 r W 9 - - - ; ;i I

-S

-tiL -5 929"

-Sideline
Chatter

Am l wmnA

-0-

9 LM2ot WO7

4,a $hrbvr'LiteiSjtttPnkt
'24.*ss JarI..ti4l

1Y.
iic:. . r

LASS IFIE
ADVERTISING
THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY'
SHOP OFFERS A
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561.
MACK TUTORING AGENCY
Open for Summer School
310 S. State St. Phone 7927
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.1
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-New apartment up-
per and lower; two blocks from
campus; modern in every re-
spect. Phone 5929. 16, 17, 18, 19
Want Ads Pay

LOST-A seven, by five black note-
book with some extra sheets in
the pocket. Return to charging
desk at General Library for re-
ward. Lost about June 29.
Subscribe TO The
Summer Daily
Use ThisColunm
Every Day

LOS.

To pay a loan of two cents to purchase a stamp commemorat-
ing the fiftieth anniversary of the invention of the incandescent
lamp, Henry Ford wrote out the above check to J. F. Quinlan,f
of New York, who is keeping the check ass a memento. The check
is worth $6.32 considering that Ford's time is valued at $1.58 a min-
ute.
FRENCH DICTATORSHIP OF MODES
FOR WORLD STANDS UNCONTESTED!

ir French journalists are fully
s aware of the influence which their
compatriots have been exercising
- in the field of American salesman-
1 ship during the past 20 years. This
- fact became very evident in an ar-
e ticle recently written for the Re-
- vue des Deux Mondes of Paris.
i As dictator of the mode, France
rules supreme, the writer believes,
t and especially is she influential in
e;the United States. Uncontested,
- her authority as arbiter of fashion
t invades the wardrobe of every well-
dressed woman, no matter how in-
significant the town in which she
may purchase her apparel.
France realizes that American-
made materials and American-
a sewn garments fill the market, but
she also knows that these articles
of clothing, without the sanction of
a French designer's name, must lose
some of the prestige that that
name has the power to bestow.
"Therefore," continues the writ-
er, "American manufacturers have,
set about to obtain the right to
claim that the dresses, wraps, and
negligees which they advertise are,
in their origin, Paris 'creations.' "
So great, in fact, has become the
publicity value of such names as
Lanvin or Poiret, that many wo-
men refuse to purchase a gown
which has not at one time been
associated with one of the well-y
known designers, the French wri-
ter avers. Woman's magazines ree-a
ognize this French influence, and
featurq style columns, whose titles,1
"Paris says," "Paris decrees," are
indicative of the trend of the fem-
inine American mind.
111111111111111111,111lIll l lllillfllllllllllly ;
NEWS FROM -
OTHER COLLEGES
nnnlllunlluuJnunnuEluullunugugi '
Iowa State.-It 'costs almost the
original price of an automobile to
operate it for one year, according
to a report by Professor T, R. Agg,
professor of civil engineering at
Iowa State college. This is espe
cially true of the lighter makes, as'
the average cost of operation varies
in proportion to the weight of the
car from 0 to 9.5 cents per mile,
Wisconsin.-Studies of the habits
and "gang-life" ol birds that have
been carried on for a number of
years at the University of Wiscon-
sin under the supervision of Pro-
fessor George Wagner, show that
thousands of birs migrate from
the United States to Canada each
year. Ten thousand birds have
been bargied within the last five
years, and bird lovers throughout
the United States and Canada send
in reports of those they find,
Nebraska.-Superior horseman-
ship was shown by University of
Nebraska coeds in the Junior
League's horse show held at the
state fair grounds recently. Their
success over Omaha and minor
delegations was witnessed by six
thousand people.

American tongues have acquired
a glib familiarity with hundreds of
French words and phrases, and it;
is seldom that one hears any of
them mispronounced. The writer
declares that to call a product by
a French name is an incontestible
recommendation, and means that
the woman who used it is convers-
ant with the prevailing American
opinion.
As the Frenchman asserts, this
condition is by no means a new
one. Since the eighteenth century,
France has been the creator of the
vocabulary of the feminine mode,
and so thoroughly established is
her influence that many French
words today have no counterpart in
the English language. This is not,
surprising to the French, for they
understand their sartorial leader-
ship. "But they do wonder," con-1
cludes the author of the article,
"at the complete assimilation of
their words into our language, an'
assimilation so complete as to prac-
tically eliminate the use of italics
in the American journals."1
Mrs. S. E. Field Dies
After Long Illness'
Mrs. Shirley E. Field, wife of
Prof. Field, instructor in mathe-
matics in the University, died sud-
denly on Wednesday, July 10, at
her home in Edgewood Hills. Serv-
ices were held Friday, July 12, at
the Field home. Interment was at
Mason.
Mrs. Field had been suffering
from tuberculosis for fourteen
years, but her condition was not
considered critical until a few hours
before her death,
Born- July 11, 1889, at Webber-
ville, Mrs. Field was numbered
among Michigan students. Al-
though she graduated from Mich-
igan State Normal college in 1910,
she was enrolled as a special stu-
dent in the literary department
here from 1923 to 1926.
She is survived by her husband,
and father, mother, and brother
living in Mason.

The performances of Eddie Tolan
in the British Columbia Mid-
Summer Athletic Carnival only
emphasizes the cry of the midget
negro's backers as the real comer
of America's sprintdom. The Wol-
verine flyer led the field in the 220
to tie the existing Canadian mark
of 21:4 seconds.
In the 100 yard event Tolan
ran second to Percy Williams,
Canada's Olympic champion.
Frank Wykoff, America's Olym-
pic star, and Glendale, Calif.,
schoolboy, finished third in this
event.
With the "big shots" of American
f tennis abroad in a desperate at-
tempt to regain the most prized
trophy in the world's sportdom, the
Davis cup, from the French, play-
ers. classed as second raters and-
the younger court talent have
monopolized court laurels this
spring.
Emmet Pare of Chicago, re-
cent winner of the national
clay courts crown at Indiana-
olis, has been seeded number
one in the western singles tour-
ney which is now under way at
the Skokie County club of Chi-
cago.
An attempt to shatter a 25 year
old record for 723 miles in 144
hours of running is underway with
the pick of this country's marathon
talent entered. Six two-man teams
have been entered with the com-
bination of Salo and Richman, win-
ners of first and fourth places re-
spectively in C. C. Pyle's cross
country event, slated as favorites.
Herb Pennock's strong hurl-
ing, backed by 15 hits on the
part of his cohorts enabled the
veteran Yankee portsider to
chalk up his fifth straight win
Friday over the Chicago White
Sox, 12-0.
Pie Traynor star third baseman
of the Pirates, will b-e out of the
game for probably the next six days
as a result of a strain injury re-
ceived in stretching for a high line
drive.
TYPEWRITERS
RIBBONS
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.
Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
best quality at a moderate price.
1 . D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

II

s
y
-

PLFXYDAY
FASHIONS
Are right in the spirit of sports-
swagger and dashing-with trim
lines and clever touches that will
make them an asset to any ward-
robe.
$S P E C I L7 5
SPECIAL!

Sweaters
Skirts ..

.... $2.95
.... $5.50

U

The Shop of
Personal Service

'.....

500 Charming
New

Summer

Dresses

3 Golf Hose
CARE IN LAUNDERING. OUR
a
I
T REA T ME NT OF THEM,
a WITH CONSIDERATION FOR
THEIR DELICACY OF TEX-
TURE, I N SU RE SOFTNESS
AND PRESERVATION.
OUR EQUIPMENT INCLUDES
aS PEC IA L LY D E SIG NE D
I
FORMS WH I CH PREVENT
SHRINKAGE AND GUARAN-
I
TEE COMFORT TO THE
WEARER
a
a
a
a
a
2
3 GOLF HOERQIRRA
22
WITHCONSIDEATIONHO
S WTUE IorSE ES E
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
I T U D o
a
a

Nebraska. -Three

speed lathel

These unusual dresses are shown in a variety of ,color
combinations and styles. Here are sleevless, semi-sleeves and
long sleeves, in wide range that will permit you to find the
right choice.
There are dotted Swiss styles, some in voile and many
in gingham, printed linen, figured lawn, pique, pongee and
dimity.
It is hopeless to try and give you an idea of the variety
of smart and ingenious details of line and finish, in this collec-
tion of summer dresses. We have them well arranged ready
for you selection.
Sizes from 14 to 46, values to $14.75-
Sizes from 14 to 46
-SECOND FLOOR-

11

machines have recently been com-
pleted by the students of mechan-
ical engineering. All the parts of
the machines were, made in the
laboratory by the students.
An exact model of the engine of
the battleship "Connecticut," has
also been constructed by the engi-
neering students.

following four men since 1919:
1919 and 1921-L. L. Bredin,
Detroit.
1922, 1921, 1925-Carlton Wells,
Ann Arbor.
1926-Dave Ward, Ann Arbor.
1927. 1928-John Mallov. Ann

11

i

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan