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July 06, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-06

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xraUX Twu

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILN

SATURDAY, JULY 6, 2929

~~AGE TWU SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1929

tumer
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications,
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. $1.so; by mail
$2.00
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925E
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Fditorial Director..........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor ........... Margaret Eckels
City Editor...................Charles Askrea
Music and Drama Editor.. R. Leslie Askren
Books Editor............Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor............S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors

Howard F. Shout
S. Cadwell Swanson
Assistants
Noah W. Bryant
Edna Henley

Walter Wilds
Harold Warren
Ledru Davis

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214j
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALKLEY
Vernor Davis
Assistant Business Managers
George Spater
Accounts Manager.............Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager............Jeanette Dale
Night Editor-WALTpR WILDS
SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1929
THE FRENCH DEBT PROBLEM
Premier Poincare must not fail
to avert the crisis in the French
Chamber if he is to retain his cabi-
net and if theirelations of France
with other nations of the world are
to be maintained on anything like
the old basis. The monkey wrench
in the French political machine is
the same that has been playing
havoc with it for some time-the
payment of America's debt. The
latest controversy on the subject,
the Mellon-Berenger debt agree-
ment, seems to have resolved itself
into a battle of wits between the
premier and the opposition party
known as the Left wing, with the
premier holding a slight advantage
in favor of a ratification.
It is perhaps unfortunate that
America cannot present a solid
front of opinion on the debt ques-
tion, for that might result in more
agreement on the other side of the
Atlantic. As things now stand
Washington has expressed itself
firmly for payment of the war debt,
whereas, other organizations and
individuals in the United States
have voiced views to the effect that
much more benefit would result
from a cancellation of all these
debts. Whatever the correct belief,
this division in America has given
heart to both parties on the ques-
tion in the sister republic, and has
resulted in one of the most acute
crisis since the war.
However, it is more than prob-
able that Premier Poincare will be
able to get out of his difficulties,
for he has more than an ordinary
advantage of his opponents in his
ability and experience, in the strong
support he now seems to be getting
from a powerful group of French
newspapers, and in the imminent
danger that France will be thrown
into a political and economic chaos
if his control is wrested from him.
ALONG THE ARCTIC CIRCLE
The advantages of the northern
route to Europe which the 'Untin
Bowler is taking would seem to
make it the most practical path-
way across the Atlantic. The flight
has been planned with unusual
care, and if it is attended with
success, will certainly be an enor-
mous stimulus to trans-Atlantic
flying.
Chief among the advantages is
the existence of frequent landing
places along the way which can
be used for fueling and resting
stops. In time these could be de-
veloped into stations of considera-
ble size. The project of adding
large airplane carriers to the train
of stopping places, which was dis-
cussed last year, might make this
route safer yet.
Another advantage, which has
been shown by meterologists in
their surveys of weather conditions
in the northern area, is the pres-
ence of almost continuous tail-
winds for half the distance each

way from continent to continent.
The very complete reports which
have been, made on atmospheric
conditions along the arctic circle
will add to the immediate impor-
tance and safety of the route.
Excluding the enormous benefits

nection with Europe by air, the
continued use of the northern path
would mean the opening up of
hitherto undeveloped areas of land
in Canada and to the east. This
development has been retarded by
the inability of man to penetrate
the northern wildernesses but with
the channels of commerce turning
in that direction, a new impetus
will be given it.
Of course, practically all state-
ments as to the future effect of
this project can be little but spec-
ulation. The immediate results
will be closer relations with Eur-
ope and a fleet of planes follow-
ing in the wake of the 'Untin Bow-
ler. And whatever may be the
fate of this pioneer along the nor-
thern air-lane, flight will mark the
beginning of a new effort to estab-
lish a safe route for the journey
to Europe by plane.
MORE COURTESY NEEDED
It has been called to our atten-
tion that some of those attending'
the University lectures in Natural
Science Auditorium have shown
discourtesy to the speakers by talk-
ing and whispering during the lec-
tures and by leaving the auditor-
ium noisily. If it is necessary to
leave early, it is suggested that
care be taken that the seat-arms do
not clatter and that the footsteps
are not any louder than can be
helped. The situation can be bet-
tered considerably if those expect-
ing to leave early will take seats
near the exits.
Whispering and talking while the
lecture is being given is certainly
not an evidence of good-breeding,
and gives visiting speakers a poor
impression of the University and
its students.
__o
Ann Arbor's Fourth of July cele-
brants hewed close to the ground
throughout the day, letting the
chips fall where they may, which
may be attributed either to the
new state law enacted against the
sale of fireworks or to the natural
ennui of the season.
Editorial Comment
THE NEWER METHOD
(From The Indiana Daily Student)
It is becoming more and more
necessary for a teacher to complete
a four-year college course. There
was a time when attendance at a
normal school with a professed
function to impart a knowledge of
teaching methods qualified one to
teach in any school. Today the
public demands a teacher who has
a b:oad background of general cul-
ture and knowledge in addition to
his ability to impart mere petty
learning. This added quality may
not help directly in the teacher's
work, but it will lend him so many
I sub-advantages that its value can
not be estimated.
The trend of having teachers with
college degrees takes away the nar-
rowly professional characteristics
of the school teacher. In place, we
have a higher and more complete
comprehension of teaching as a dis-
tinctive profession, one which de-
mands a fulsome outlook on life as
a complete panorama.
The fact that a teacher in train-
ing is taking a number of theory
and method courses will change his
attitude toward the more general
courses he pursues in the universi-
ty. He will regard them with the
eyes of a prospective teacher rather
than the naivete of the arts stu-

dent. He will find in them a help-!
fulness in his profession which the
highly specialized courses of the
I old-fashioned normal school never
offered. He will find his liberal arts
courses a professional complement
to his more specific teaching cours-
es.
George H. Shafer, a Connecticut
educator, says, "The liberal arts
college must give control of life
values, but it need not make the
*student conscious of the values of
specific subject matter in bringing
about these controls. The teach-
er, on the other hand, must not'
only acquire these controls, as such,
but must also learn to view sub-
ject matter-arithmetic, geography,
literature-as instruments of con-
trol."
Educators are realizing more and
more that a four-year college
course is essential to make a suc-
cessful teacher. They realize, too,
that this cultural training must be
linked well with the specialized
courses.
Thus, reviewing what the think-
ing educators of the country have
to say about the newer methods of
training teachers, one realizes that
the teachers enrolled in the sum-
mer session have an advanced view
toward their chosen profession.
Success surely will be theirs for they
have an enlightened attitude to-

o 0
Music And Drama
o 0
TONIGHT: The Michigan Re-
pertory Players present "Es-
cape" by John Galsworthy, in
Mendelssohn Theater, begin-
ning at 8:15 o'clock.
NAIVELY, BITTER AND SWEET
SPIDER KIN, by Forman Brown;
1929, Robert Packard & Co. $2.00.
RED KITES and WOODEN
CROSES; by Rosa Zagnoni Mar-
noni; 1929, Robert Packard & Co.
$2.00.
For those wno rind the rush of
angels' wings in the sigh of the
breeze through spider webs, For-
man Brown's volume should be the
captured echo of the "Vast Infer-
red." His Muse is a fragile spirit;
and it is a little to be feared that
his awe at her fragility has hin-
dered his empetuous wooing. Her
revenge has been the tenuosity
both of line and substance that
mars this frequently brilliant col-
lection.
"For rhymes have neither lips nor
breath
nor fingers warm and kind,
and beauty, when it weaves too
mad
a dance, like love, is blind."
Brown occasionally achieves the
ecstasy here suggested, but success
has come from a descriptive sense
highly naive in its objectivity and
widely ranged in observation and
then only on occasions that have
made slender demands of his sty-
listic talent.
Death In Winter
"The snow was white as satin,
the moon was white as lawn,
the sky was like a matin
rehearsed before the dawn.
The river shone like jasper
saverthe jagged mark
where water was a vesper
mumbled in the dark.
But in cases where naivete of ob-
servation has led to some startling
figures, the same naivete in atti-
tude has only brought about the
rather plaintive "wondering" that
has been characteristic of our mi-
nor prophets of the Muse, without
a compensating vigor of expression.
But if Brown's naivete suffers
from lack of vigor, Mme Marinoni's
certainly does not; which is to im-
pute the same attitude of mind
to the lady as that to be found in
Mr. Brown's verses, with this dif-f
ference, that Brown's preoccupa-
tion is with things of the senses:
"The days of beauty are not gone,
for I can tremble still
at bluets in a flannel lawn
and tansy on a hill."
while Mme. Marinoni epitomizes*
herself in "Junk Shop:"
"My heart is a junk shop
Wherein are heaped
The dusty glances, distorted de-
sires,
Broken hopes, and rusty dreams,
Of the men who have loved me."
-literary entities and idea frag-
ments which she tops off, bravely,
with the couplet-
"Do not peer into my junk shop,
Lest you spy a bit of yourself."
But the vigor of her irony has
not led her far into a vigorous in-
quiry into the tissue of life, (from
which she loves to choose a fiber
and anatomize it.)
SAND
"Her hair is the color of sand-
Her clothes are drab, like sand-
Her voice grates, like sand.

As I see her sit
Impassionately in a chair,
Her hands folded on her lap,
I wonder about the rapids
That have washed over her E
Before she became sand. . "
Which would seem to be a little
too much about the rapids and not
enough of the rush of water that
does make sand. But if the lash
of irony leads to good things, it
also leads beyond them, ending up
in the epigrammatic epitaph:
"Life is a pencil sharpener
It consumes while sharpening."
The irony hides an essentially ro-
mantic spirit. Mme Marinoni likes
to picture herself and her verse
like a lash;"
"My words drop on pink paper
with the crash
Of broken dishes hurled to an
ash can.
My verse is no caress, rather a
lash
That curls about the strutting
limbs of man."
Mr. William Stanley Braithwaite
calls this quatrain "her intellectual
credo around which she wraps a
poetic irony." And continues to
identify her poetic operations With,
"her dreaming is as a lover of hu-
manity rather than as a rapturous
celebrant of amorous moods; and
that is why she shoots so many ar-
rows of Puckish wit."
R. L. A.

t)lurdi 4 rrutorL

Summer Daily
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"JESUS REINTERPRETED"
Jesus, the accursed and perse-
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t ue and false motives, of their
ignorance, credulity and stu-
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interpret him for ourselves
and our own generation!

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
THE SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER
TRINITY
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
11:00 A. M.--Holy Communion,
Preacher, The Reverend Henry
Lewis.

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PRESBYTERIAN
Huron and Division
10 A. M.-Student Class. Merle
H. Anderson, teacher.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The World's Great-
est Memorial." Summer Com-
munion Service.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for
Young People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's
Meeting.

RESERVE A SEAT IN
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Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
$7.50 per week
Lunch and Dinner, $6.00 per week

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FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
10:30 A. M.-Regular morning
service. Subject: "God."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School fol-
lowing the morning service.
7:45 Wednesday evening testi-
monial meeting.
The reading room 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building
is open daily from 12 to 5
o'clock except Sundays and
Holidays.
GONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
State and William Streets
Aeeleson Ray Heaps, Minister
SUNDAY, JULY 7
10:45-Sermon by Mr. Heaps.
Subject: "Freedom from
Fear." Special reference to the
case of Dr. Ozora Davis, who,
with but a short time remain-
ing to live, tells why he faces
the future without fear.
I-
FIRST METHODIST}
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Corner S. State and E. Wash.
Arthur W. Stalker, D.D., and
Samuel J. Harrison, Ministers.
SUNDAY, JULY 7, 1929
10:30-Morning Service. Rev.
Clyde Gearhart of Dearborn,
Mich., will spear on "The
Power of the Unseen."
12:00-Class for summer stu-
dents meets in Wesley Hall,
Mr. Frank Willis will speak on
"Interest,"
6:00-Wesleyan Guild Devotional
Meeting. Leader: Miss Ruth
Magee.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron below State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles, Minister.
Rev. Howard R. Chapman, Min-
ister to Students.
9:30-Summer Student Group
at Guild House, 503 E. Huron.
Mr. Chapman will speak.
9:30-Church Bible School.
10:30-Morning Worship and
Sermon. Organ Recital, Fit-
teen minutes. Duet, "My
Faith Looks Up to Thee," Mr.
Stitt and Mr. Field.
Sermon, THY KINGDOM COME.
(In series on The Lord's Prayer)
R. Edward Sayles.

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