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July 04, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-04

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THE WEATHER
erally Fair with Possible
Showers

1Ai7I hr t Jumml1r

~Iai1y

MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATED

PRESS

X, No. 10. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1929 PRICE FIVE CENTS

i - -- -- -- _... _. - --- -- -

f

BUCATION SCHOOL
EAN ANNOUNCES
EW APPOINI[S

VIBIA MAN NAMED
HEAD UNIVERSITY
HIGH SCHOOL

TO

DR, OLSON TO DIRECT
CHILD WELFARE WORK
Will Devote Time to New Elemen-
tary School Project and Prob-
lems of Research
Announcement of the appoint-
ment of two new men to the fac-
ulty of the School of Education
was made yesterday by Dr. J. B.
Edmonson,. dean of the education
school. Dr. Willard C. Olson, now
of the University of Minnesota, was
elected at the May meeting of the
Board of Regents, and given the
title of associate professor of edu-
cation and director of research in
child development. Edgar G. John-
ston, Columbia university, has
been appointed principal of the
University high school, and given
the rank of assistant professor of
secondary education.
EVementary School Attracts
Dr. Olson received his Ph.D. from
the University of Minnesota. In re-
cent years he has been actively en-
gaged, in research work involving
the characteristics of children and
is at present a cooperating mem-
ber of the staff of the Institute of
Child welfare at Minnesota.uBe-
fore completing his graduate work,
Dr. Olson served for a few years
in administrative positions in the
public schools of Minnesota. He
held a fellowship under the Na-
tional Research Council board in
biological sciences during 1926-27.
He is a member of numerous pro-
fessional and honorary societies in
the field of psychology and educa-
tion. Dr. Olson is the author of
numerous magazine articles on re-
search problems. He will not come
to the University until the Fall
semester.
Dr. Olson, it is said, was attracted
to the University because of the
plans for the new elementary
school. He will devote most of his
time during the next year to the
development of this project. ,
Professor Johnston will succeed
H. H. Ryan whose resignation was
accepted at the meeting of the
Board in May in order that he
might acpet appointment as prin-
cipal of the University of Ws-
consin.
Johnston to Receive Degree
Johnston is a graduate of Woo-
ster college and has taken gradu-
ate work at Columbia and Stan-
ford universities. He will receive
his doctor's degree during the sum-
mer. He has had several years' ex-
perience in the public schools in the
southwestern states. For four
years he served as head of the de-
partment of Latin in the high
school of Ogden, Utah, later teacb-
ing the same subject in the Lewis
and Clark high school, Spokane,
Wash. During the next four years
he was vice-principal of the San
Diego high school which is one of
the largest secondary schools in the
state of California.
W. L. Carr, acting principal of
the University high school, is at
Columbia university for two months
during the summer, and while he
is there will plan with Johnston
in regard to the opening of the
high school in the fall.
MAJOR MELBERG
GIVEN NEW POST
Major Reinold Melberg, in charge
of the local Reserve Officers' Train-
ing Corps, will leave Ann Arbor on

August 1, according to an an-
nouncement made yesterday. His
place will be taken by Major Basil
D. Edwards (infantry), who has re-
cently completed studies at the Ar-
my War Colege in Washington.
Major Edwards is now in Ann Ar-
bor for a few days getting in touch
with the local situation. He will

MANY ATTEND
DOUGLAS LAKE)
According to latest reports from
the University's biologicalrstation
at Douglas Lake, Mich., more than
84 persons are in attendance. It is RARCH GRO
expected that the enrollment will
pass the 90 mark within the next R S A C H 9
few days. Of these, 55 are graduate:
students, 28 from the College of
Literature,2Science, and the Arts, NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
and one from the education school. HONORS PROFESSOR OF
From this camp-the largest in- ENGINEERING
land station in the country for
biological research and investiga- APPOINTMENT LASTS
tion-more than 200 titles have THREE-YEAR PERIOD
been published since its establish--
ment. Eighteen of these were re- White Has Directed Enginering Re-
leased during 1928. search in Engineering School
Prof. George R. LaRue of the During Past Few Years
zoology department is the director
of the camp. Among the visiting Professor A. E. White, director of
instructors this year are Prof. the department of Enginering Re-
Frank C. Gates, Kansas State Ag- search of the University, has just
ricultural college; Prof. George E. received word of a signal honor
Nichols, Yale university; Prof. Her- in his appointment as a member
bert B. Hungerford, University of of the National Research Council
Kansas; Prof. Charles W. Creaser, on the Division of Engineering and
College of the City of Detroit, Industrial Research for the three
Prof. W. W. Cort, Johns Hopkins years beginning July 1, 1929.
uhoms, niversity of .Lyeli J. In a letter announcing the ap-
hoasU iyo i. pointment to Prof. White, T. H.
Morgan, President of the National
ccademy of Sciences, made the fol-
owing statement: "Pursuant to
^e request of the President of the
United States that the National
Academy of Sciences perpetuate
the National Research Council of
in acordance with the recommen-
dation of that Council upon nomi..
Sports Director Names Regulations ntion by the American Society of
Governing Baseball; Schedule Mechanical Engineers, it gives me
of Teams Drawn Up pleasure to appoint you as a mem-
ber of the National Research Coun-
cil on the Division of Engineering
LEAGUE PAIRiNGS MADE and Industrial Reserach for the
Schedules of games of the soft three years beginning July 1, 1929."
Scedullesogagu e of the s oft For the post year Prof. White has
baseball league of the School of been director of the Engineering
Education have been announced by Research department of the Uni-
Paul R. Washke, assistant director Reseaychndepartmentoen -
of te Itraura Sprtsdepart- versity and has been spending most
of the Intramural Sports dof his time working on experiments
ment. The following regulations with coal gases. This spring dur-
have been drawn up: All games ing a convention in Grand Rapids
to be played on Ferry Field; bails, of the officials of the various gas!
bats, and umpires to be furnished companies of the State he deliv-
by Intramural Sports department; ered an address in which he told
all games to be seven innings; a set of his experiments in attempting I
of rules can be gotten from the to evaluate different kinds of coal
Intramural office; each team plays for their as making properties
every other team twice. The results of the experiments the
The league consists of four teams officials approved of heartily, agree-
as follows-Faculty, Principals, ing that in time they might be able
Teachers, and Superintendents. to save many thousands of dol-
So far there nave been but two lars. The experiments are being
games played-The Superintend- carried out in an up to date gas
ents defeated the Faculty 8 to 4, plant belonging to the Detroit City
and the Teachers overcame the Gas company and is situated about
Principals 5 to 3. The schedule for twenty miles out of Detroit.

l

FEATURES THIRD
[XCURSION TRIP'
ORIGINAL WORKS OF GREAT
MASTERS FOUND IN
COLLECTIONS
MIXED EXHIIBITS WILL
PORTRAY ART EPOCHS
Party Will View Detroit from Top
of General Motors Office
Building
Easily the outstanding feature
of the third excursion on the sum-
mer school program will be the
visit to the Detroit Institute of
Arts. A number of originals of the
old masters, such as Rubens, Franz
Hals, and Van Dyke are found in
the Arts Institute. The collections
are all arranged according to peri-
ods and countries; the decorations
and even furniture of the rooms
conforming to these.
European art will be first viewed
by the party, then the Asiatic
rooms, in which an unusually com-
plete collection of Chinese and
Japanese work may be found. The
prehistoric art rooms at the back
of the building immediately adjoin
a beautiful garden and court.
The American section should
prove of unusual interest. A com-
plete colonial kitchen and a mid-
eighteenth century dining room are
found here, representing two pha ses
in the development of American in-
terior decoration.
A section of the Institute is also
devoted to local, that is to say, De-
troit art. Gari Melchers, who.
created the murals at either end of
the main reading room of the Uni-'

RTi INSTITU'

FRENCHMAN HANDS
WORST DEFEAT
CAREER

TE

"BIG BILL"
OF HIS

NEW CHAIRMAN
'OF COMMISSARS

S. J. Syrtzow
Young chairman of the
Commissars, who is one
youngest cabinet heads
world.

Russian
of the
in the,

COCHET WINS OVER
iTiILDEN IN BRITISH
RACQUET TOURNEY

HE.[ALT1HINST1ITT
Week'y Lectures for Public Health
Workers Not Attending
University
FRIDAY PROGRAM GIVEN
The third of the series of six
Special Public Health Institutes
which are held one every week-end,
from June 21 to July 27, will meet
this wek-end, in the auditorium of
the West Medical building, Friday
and Saturday, July 5 and 6, under
the direction of Dr. C. V. Merritt
of Flint.

ALI
Ame
in
W
Big
agai
or H
of tl
and
feat
flict
6-4,
Til
ite
can
clas,
whil
Bor
stin
red
char
bour
yout
of 6
the
last
Ti
reac
an
two
Jaco
men
ley
Ridl

.
.
I
I
'

the remaining games is given be.,
low.
Tues., July 9-Faculty vs. Prin.
Tues., July 9--Teach. vs Supts.
Thurs., July 11-Faculty vs. Teach.
Thurs., July 11-Prin. vs. Supts.
Tues., July 16--Faculty vs. Supts.
Tues., July 16-Prin. vs. Teach.
Thurs., July 18-Faculty vs. Prin.
Thurs., July 18-Teach. vs. Supts.
Tu'es., July 23-Faculty vs. Teach.
Tues., July 23-Prin. vs. Supts.
All games start at 4:15 o'clock.
Players are requesteddto observe
the above rules and dates." Any
misunderstanding is to be referred
to the intramural office at once,j
and all further information can be
secured there.
LEAGUE LIBRARY
HAS NEW RULING
In consideration of the honor
system employed in the League li-
brary, those in charge request that
no books be removed from that
room to be taken to another. In
addition, by replacing books in
their original positions on the
shelves, their orderly arangement
will be preserved.
The League library books were
given by the women students of last
year in appreciation of the achieve-
ment of Mrs. W. D. Henderson in
bringing about the completion of
the League building. Additions in
the form of gifts are constantly
being made to the library.
DANCING TO BEGIN
Granger's Dancing Academy will
open Friday night, according to the
latest report. The Polar Bears, the
dance orchestra that has been
playing at Whitmore Lake for the

Prof. White is also one of the'
members of the Engineering school*
faculty who made arrangements
for a co-operative - course of edu-
cation between the University and
the Consumer's Poxver company'
and the Detroit City Gas company.'
This course is a four year schedule
by which students can combine a!
college education with practical{
working experience in gas and elec-
trical plants.
GALSWORTHY PLAY:
THEMES TO MAKN
A Review by William J. Gorman1
A large audience last night was
treated to what one would almost
believe a rarety-light, amiable{
theatrical diversion from the hand
of Galsworthy-here a gracious 1
hand. True there are themes -
law, justice, Christian ethics, hu-
man cruelty, etc.-tossed about, but
the audience is only invited to fon-
dle them gently and they in no,
way interfere with the leisurely en-
joyment of the engaging humours
of each situation. True, the end is
tragic - the gentleman conviq,
thoroughly depressed by the vaga-
ries of communal ethics, nobly
plays the game in refusing to let
the good parson lie for him-; but
even this is not disturbingly serious.
but pleasantly platitudinous. Gals-
worthy is essentially telling a dra-
matic narrative and in addition by
subtle choice of situations he has
made an appeal (not deep or touch-
ing but altogether amiable) to the
intellects in the theater audience
who, by hook or crook, want their
attitudes toward something or
other verified or damned.
So far, director and cast have
"done right by" Galsworthy. The

versity Library is represented as These Special Public Health In- last
well as Ernest Harrison Barnes who stitutes are designed especially for ing
formerly resided in Ann Arbor and public health workers who can not Mrs.
taught painting in the University. find any other way of attending of 6
Additional work of Melchers will the regular University Summer Ti
be seen at the Detroit Library Session or of taking advantage of stro
across the street from the Institute, the summer curriculum of the Di- Lott
Upon leaving the library the vision of Hygiene and Public Unit
party will adjourn to the General therefore, aim to combine and i- C. H
Motors cafeteria for lunch. A view terisify the regular academic work 11-9
of the city from the top of the Health. The week-end institutes, thre
eighteen story building will consti- of the Division with the added ad- fina
tute the next feature in the pro- vantage that any single one or all the
gram of entertainment. The new of the series may be taken. Lec- and
Fisher building and the Detroit tures covering the wide range of cour
News, including radio station fields which play a part in public folio
WWJ, will also be inspected during health will be given each day from and
the day. nine o'clock until four. estc
The party will leave at 8 o'clock The following program for Fri- Van
Saturday morning- from State and day has been planned for the In- ther
Packard streets, returning to the stitute under the direction of Dr. Ame
city at 4 o'clock. Reservations may Merritt:
still be obtained by calling at the 9Ba. m.-Child Hygiene, Miss Edith Al
summer session office in University 10 a. m.MtriyadIfn thai
hall. 10 a. m.-Maternity and Infant
Hygiene, Dr. Lillian R. Smith. expl
'11 a. m.-Municipal Health Prob- pro
S WITH 'ESCAPE' lems and Administration, Dr. Henry play'
C.E AUDIENCE THINK F. Vaughan. of a
12:15 p. m.-Luncheon, Michigan lang
many scenes the director (and in- Union. ofa
cidentally the stage hands) has 2 p. m.-Health Education and Frer
kept the play surprisingly taut. Publicity, Miss Marjorie Delavan. tout
And too, those lines which contain 3 p. m.-Modern Methods of I
suggestions (of course just sugges- Venereal Disease Control, Dr. R. E. ,up
Dixon.cline
tions) of social themes are tossed Dixon.
out in a carefully careless way. 4 p. m.-Recreation in the United HeE
But Galsworthy was delineating States, Mr. William G. Robinson. can
a character also. Here, possiblyi The Presiding Officer for Satur- freq
the production failed somewhat. day, the second day of the Insti- turn
The only thing the narrative ele- tute, will be Dr. John D. Monroe, rath
ment in the drama demanded of of the Oakland County Health Unit. thri
Mr. Secord was to be continually Although of particular interest to
on the run; such impressions as public health workers, those in [ GI
this demanded of him he projected charge invite any of the generalf
convincingly with a good deal of public who are interested in pub-
technical skill. But Galsworthy lic health and hygiene work to at-
carefully drew a character-an tend the series. The lectures will C:
English soldier and gentleman, begin promptly on the hour. swif
drawn to a state of complete "sym- and
pathy with self" by the degrading' BASEBALL SCORES ,bian
life in prison, subjected to the its
maddening hetereogeneity of the (By Associated Press) its
social character, gradually break- American League Chic
ing down until ready to admit St. Louis 8, Detroit 6. C
somewhat absuredly that he can't Philadelphia 9, Washington 7. king
escape his 'better self.' In the ' New York 6, Boston 5. I the
characterization, Mr. Secord some- Chicago 6, Cleveland 3. 10 inn- soa
what failed. He openly played for ings. hea
sympathy by giving the character m.I
such a galant tone. He might bet- National League live:
ter have steered the part in a mid- New York 11, Boston 3. Ber

L FRENCH BATTLE
ASSURED IN FINALS
ricans Still Holding Advantage
n Women's Singles and Men's
Doubles Events
(By Associated Press)
IMBLEDON, England, July 3-
Bill Tilden blazed away in vain
nst the shining tennis armor
[enri Cochet in the semi-finals
he British championship today
suffered th'e most decisive de-
the Frenchman has ever in-
ed upon him. The scores were
6-1, 7-5.
dens elimination put a defin-
end to the last of the Ameri-
hopes so far as Wimbledon's
sic singles event is concerned,
e a smashing victory by Jean
otra over England's Bunny Au-
in the other semi-final assur-
an all-French battle for the
mpionship on Saturday. The
nding Basque trimmed Britain's
hful standard bearer by scores
-1, 10-8, 5-7, 6-1, to bring about
first all-French final in the
six years of this tournament.
Two Helens Remain
he woman's singles event, which
hed the semi-final round, was
Anglo-American affair with the
Helens, Miss Wills and Miss
bs, opposing two English wo-
, Elsie Goldsack and Joan Rid-
respectively tomorrow. Miss
ey gained a place among the
surviving four today by defeat-
the veteran American player,
May Sutton Burdy, by a score
-3, 6-2.
ie Americans a still going
ng in the men's doubles. George
and John .Hennessey, the
ed States champions, trounced
. Kingsley and J. S. Ollins 6-3,
, 9-7, 6-2 to make a total of
e American pairs in the semi-
s. Lott and Hennessey meet
British team of J. C. Gregory
I. G. Collins in the center
t tomorrow,.their match being
wed by that between Tilden
Frank Hunter, with the young-
of the three combinations, John
Rhyn and Wilmer Allison. Thus
e is a posibility of another all-
rican final Saturday.
Tilden Plays Brilliantly
though it was more one-sided
. most of the spectators had
ected, the Tilden-Cochet match
tided brilliant tennis. Big Bill
Ted every shot with the finesse
master, but the great Cochet,
uid, unhurried,. the antithesis
all popular 'conceptions of a
nchman, always had the magic
h in reserve for winning points.
i game after game Tilden piled
points and then could not
ch his advantagewith winners,
expended much energy with his
non-ball service, which scored
uently, and in the third set
ied what would have been a
ter inglorious defeat into a
lling finish.
ANT SEAPLANE
OFF FOR BERLIN
(By Associated Press)
HICAGO, Ill., July 3.-Heading
ftly northward over Wisconsin
into Canada, the giant amphi-
z "Untin Bowler" was well on
way today onthe first leg of
5000 mile flight to Berlin from
cago.

arrying a bag of mail, letters to
gs, presidents, and mayors on
European continent, the plane
red from Lake Michigan and
ded along the shore at 8:48 a.
D. S. T. The crew hopes to de-
r the mail to the postmaster of

lin within'

a week, the I

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