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August 08, 1929 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-08

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PROF. AMOS 1. MORRIS
DISCUSSES RHETORIC'
LABORATORY PURPOSE
SAYS OBJECT IS TO APPLY
SCIENCE TO LITERARY
CRITICISM
USES PHYSICS AS BASIS
Demonstrations Operation of Rhe-
toric Laboratory Methods in
Study of Joint Play
Discussing the rhetoric labora-
tory, Dr. Amos R. Morris, assistant
professor of rhetoric, stated that
the only ultimate aim is to apply
to literary criticism the methods
of objective science. "We are now
whoely concerned with the develop-
light of modern science."
ment of technique for the discovery
or the rediscovery, of the laws
underlying rhetoric," Prof. Morris
said, "and the laboratory is con-
cerned in rewriting rhetoric in the
The technique of it is based upon
the technique of physics. It starts
on the assumption that language is
primarily a temporal art making
use of sound. The first problem is
the adequate recording of sound
and the analysis of tempo, pitch
cadences, stress of words, -and the
relation to each other of the words
stressed. "I can't see why students1
of literature hadn't begun to be
curious of the organization of tone
qualities soon after the invention
of the telephone," Prof. Morris said.
"Certainly nothing was done in the
field before that time." In 1900,.
Scripture of Yale was the first man
to tackle the problem, and by 1910,
Professor Meader and Dr. Shepard
had it definitely under way at
Michigan. Prof. Morris has been
active in this work since 1912.
Application Causes Curiosity
Curiosity as to the practical ap-
plication of the rhetoric laboratory
is quite general. Prof. Morris be-,
lieves that when an adequate tech-
nique is developed, almost any
problem of literary criticism might
be answered not from the angle of
its philosophy but from the angle'
of its art. Even doubtful author-
ship could be answerable by the
laboratory method. "For instance,"''
he explained, "if two authors cor-
roborated on the writing of a play,
and the question was to discover
which one. wrote a certain scene,
by the use of the laboratory one
could analyze the rhythm of two
consecutive scenes.
A given speaker has a peculiar
rhythm of his own which an analy-
sis of 500 sentences will show as a
definite pattern. This pattern
never varies, so the solution then,
is to chart the rhythm of the scene1
in dispute. In every case the ac-
curacy ought to approach 80 per-
cent or 90 percent. The old methods
of literary criticism were merely
opinions, but the new scientific
plans provide definite proof.
Is Psychology Applied
The rhetoric laboratory is an ap-
plication of psychology to literature.
Good work in this field requires
training in physics having to do'
with the elements of mechanics,1
sound, and electricity, a. thorough
study of psychology including an-
atomy and neurology, and a com-
petence at least in literature. Prof.
Morris thinks that eventually the

rhetoric laboratory ought to prove'
of more interest to women than
to men, for while it is fundamen-
tally a science, it is primarily an
art and women have always been
more concerned with the artistic.
"As far as the teaching of the'
methods is concerned, it is a blind
alley," Prof. Morris believes, "and
it will take a full generation before
science will have made sufficient
impact on literature tohmake it a
commercial avenue. The rhetoric
laboratory is pioneer work."
WATER SUPPLY IMPROVED
(By Associated Press{
EAST GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.,
August 8-This city is enjoying an
improved water supply as the re-
sult of the recent installation of
a new pump at the Reed's Lake
intake. The new intake runs 1,300'
feet into the lake. The depth at
the terminus is 35 feet at a point
where the lake is 45 feet deep. Thus
the waterdcomes from the springs
which feed the lake.
Student Cards Important
All students in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts, the
School of Education, or the Grad-
uate School, are urged to make
sure that their addresses and elec-

Renominated

Mayor James J. Walker
The dapper mayor of New Yor
City who is pictured above has o
late come in for much censure fo
his foppish habits. Walker is on
of the best dressed men in Ne
York and it is rumored that he ha
a special room downtown in whici
he may change his clothes.
SPORTS BRIEFS
(By Associated Press)
HONOLULU, T. H.-This year'
Hawaiian open golf - tournamen
will be played at the Waialae cours
in Honolulu, Nov. 15, 16 and 17.
Eighteen, of the leading profes
sional golfers in the United State:
will participate. Transportation t
and from the mainland will be pro
vided for them, and during thei
stay in Hawaii they will be th
guests of the Royal Hawaiian hote
at Waikiki Beach. Hawaii's cham
pions will also compete.
The winner of the open will re
ceive a $6,000 purse.
The time has passed when men
and women played a different styl
of golf.
A few years agot the woman wh
could drive straight down the fair-
way for 200 yards was an excep
tion. Now it is seldom that a clu
cannot send out several women
players who can drive and putt a,
well as most of its male members
DES MOINES. - Frank Brody
Iowa state tennis champion, ad
vanced into the finals of the men'E
singles of the Des Moines distric
tennis tournament here today b
defeating Joe Van Ginkel, 1-6, 7-5
6-4, 12-10. John Tatom won th
right to meet Harris Coggeshall im
the semi-finals tomorrow by de
feating Merle Robins of Ames, 6-1
6-4. The winner of the Tatom
Coggeshall match will face Brod
in the finals Saturday.
FT. SNELLING, Minn.-A wel
trained team of players from Ft
Des Moines, Ia., rode to a 14 to 4
victory over the St. Paul Whites i
the northwest polo tournamen
here today. The win advanced th
Iowans to the finals with Pierre, S
D., the match to be played Sunday
WASHINGTON.-Clarence Char
est, who has only one arm, ha
won his fourth District of Columbi
singles tennis championship. De
spite his handicap of having t
hold racket and ball in one han(
when serving. Charest has a fas
delivery that bewilders opponents
He is an employe of the interna
revenue bureau.
VALDOSTA, Ga.-Members of th
golfing Oliver family of Valdost
are on the warpath. They hav
won two titles in two weeks. Joh
took the Georgia state champion
ship and Max came along the nex
week to annex the Piney Wood
championship at Thomasville.

'SCIENCE TEACHERS IN Niche For Beebe
GREATEST DIMAND, is
SECRETARY'S REPOT.
REQUESTS F O R CHEMISTRY
INSTRUCTORS MANY, SAYS
MRS. SHAMBAUGH
BAND MEN ALSO NEEDED{
Are Wanted To Handle Subjects <
in Addition To Giving *.* .....r. : :
Music Instruction1
"There have been many calls this{
summer for science teachers," says i
Mrs. Hellen 'Shambaugh, former *..:
secretary of the Bureau of Ap- <:':
pointments, "They are wanted to ~
teach high school physics, chem-?
istry and mathematics. Many calls"
have also come for men for band
and orchestra work but schools oft-
entimes want people who can teach
one of the regular academic sub-
jects in addition to the music work. I .
k Another teaching combination fre-
f quently asked for is that of athlet-
r ic coach and professor of a regu- Dr. William Beebe
e lar subject. All the history teach- Noted explorer and naturalist,
ers have not been placed as yet," who is expected to be selected for
s Mrs. Shambaugh states, "but this a niche in the New York University
h subject is usually overcrowded." Hall of Fame. Dr. Beebe is famous
She also declares that education- the world over for his discoveries
al administrators' are asking for of many species of deep sea fish.
changes of position but that few _
have been affected so far. "The..
placement of teachers rates near-s
ly the same this year as last," she' NEWS FROM
s declared, "and I expect nearly ev- OTHER COLLEGES
t eryone will be taken care of by the
e first of September." -
Place Many in State TEXAS.-For $750 a Texas phy-
The inexperienced woman teach- sicist built sound picture equipment
- er usually starts out at $1,400 a that furnishes "talkies" to an au-
s year, according to Mrs. Shambaugh, dience of 3,000 in the auditorium
o and a man at $1,600. Public school of the Texas College of Industrial
- teachers are usually placed in the Arts:
r state of Michigan or in nearby '
e states, but college teachers are sent aWhatever defects the apparatus
all ver he cuntr. may have" says the builder, Prof.
C. N. Adkisson, head of the physics
Mrs. Shambaugh has recently re-'
- Mr. Shmbauh ha recntlyre-department, "it is; as good as those
signed her position as Secretary of depatment, "
_ used anywhere."
the Bureau of Appointments to ac-C
company her husband, Dr. Noel F. Dr. Adkisson built the equipment
Shambaugh, to Long Beach, Cali- because the college lacked funds to
o fornia, where he will practise med- pay for ordinary apparatus. Some
e icine. Graduating from the Uni- of the parts were made by electri-
versity of Michigan in 1919, Mrs. cians and mechanics at the school,
' Shambaugh took graduate work at some bought second hand and
- Carnegie Institute of Technology in others ordered from factories.
- the field of personnel. She then
b accepted a position in Canton, O., ILLINOIS.-Aid for both dairy!
a working with department store per- farmers and milk distributors will
S sonnel and from there went to Co- be sought in research to be carried
. lumbus with the Ohio State De- out at the University of Illinois
partment of Education. Agricultural experiment station
, Organized School during the next two years.

TALKIESHA
TO STAY,
NOTED SCRE

YE~~ OMCASSII
DECLARES TYPEWRITING AND MIM
GRAPHING promptly and ne ly
Cdone by experienced operators at
moderate rates. College work a
EN CRITI specialty since 1908. E. D.
O. D. MORRILL
'ND HAS NOT 17 Nickels Arcade

ADVENT
LED

Or SOU
BROADW
HOLLYW

VAY
OOD

INTO

)

i

THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY
SHOP OFFERS A
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561.

RETAIN FORMER ACTORSI
Actors Experience "Stage Fright On
First Appearance in Talking
Moving Pictures
In the year that has passed!
since the "talkies" began to at-
tract international notice, the
talking picture has become an es-
tablished fact, declares Robert E.
Sherwood, noted film critic. Dur-
ing that short time, he asserts, the
producers have discovered that the
talkia nAA d t b manmrsr

s

MACK TUTORING AGENCY
Open for Summer School
310 S,. State St. Phone 7927
TYPING DONE-English, French,
German, or Italian. Mrs. F. F.
4Isbel, 526 S. Division. Phone
6946. 32, 33, 34, 35, 36
TYPING--Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
LOST

LeOTee- non Secome a mere re-unday shell rim spec-
production of a stage play. tacles in cowhide case bearing
The introduction of the micro- name Schoenig, N. Y. C. Phone
phone on the Hollywood lot had a 3022.
strange effect on the actors, Mr.
Sherwood explains. Immediately, FOR SALE
all that they had learned about FOR SALE-Canoe in good condi-
cinema acting vanished, and inits tion. Price reasnable. Call 3509
stead came the unaccustomed feel- for information.
ing that an actor behind the foot- n
FOR SALE--A 7-passenger '25
lights experiences. The result wasA
dialogue with very little continued Marmon touring car. Excellent
movement. condition. Very cheap. Mrs.
Returns to Mobility Harold Trosper, 924 Baldwin.
Telephone 9824.
Now the motion picture has re-
turned to its former mobility, ac- FOR RENT
cording to Mr. Sherwood, and is
again telling its story with action' FOR RENT-Student wanted to
though this time with the addi-sETSuen atdt
tion of words. share suite with graduate man,.
Inquire 110 N. State.

....

V
a
{
1
1
1
1
I

Mr. Sherwood characterizes the
reform that brought about this re-
turn to old methods as being at
once reactionary and progressive.
"The Broadway Melody" and "Ali-
bi" he mentions as being among
the first pictures to achieve the
old form. With "Bulldog Drum-
mond," the realization that the
nmovie was not to be talked to deathi
w ac OCr'I

FOR RENT-Large furnished front
room. Garage room possible. No
other roomers. Instructor or
graduate preferred. Phone 8579
after 6 p. m. 37, 38, 39
WANTED
WANTED-Two men want ride
east as far as Boston or Now
York. Will pay expenses. Call
7690, 0. T. H. Reed, Jr.
WANTED-At once, an agregive
salesman for new business. Ex-
cellent opportunities for a pro-
ducer. For information and in-
terview write, Box 209.

w U ue ( u.
The fears of the former silent
film stars lest they be eclipsed have
not been justified, in Mr. Sher-
wood's opinion. Although those
old favorites who have vanished
blame the talkies, he believes that
they would not have continued to;
act much longer, even if the silent
films had not lost their popular-
ity.j
In view of the fact that Broad-'
way stage favorites have failed to
I fulfill the pessimistic predictions
that they would invade the motion

~Upon her
s baugh she
t where she
y in the voca
, ment and
e school und
tem. Next
- Switzerlan
''was studyi
- Berne. In
y took the 1
the Bureau
which sheI
l the past tv
t.
E SLAT[
t GRA
e
. Consolid
and Slater
- name of S
s was annoui
a vin J. Slate
- The merge
o Graham s
d company.
dt Organiza
corporation
j ing to Mr.
be electedI
organizatio
e near future
a Both the
e cerns have
n about 13 ye
- purchased
t in 1916 and
s opened ai
same time.

r marriage to Dr. Sham- Approved by the board of trus- picture world, replacing the for-
came to Ann Arbor, tees at its meeting, the project calls mer Hollywood stars, Mr. Sherwood
taught retail education for a two-year study of factors believes that the majority of those
tional education depart- affecting the marketability of fluid who have had screen experience
organized a part-time milk. The International Associa- will continue to act, facing the
er the public school sys- tion of Milk Dealers will establish microphone, as well as the camera.
t, she spent a year in a research assistantship in dairy;
id, where her husband husbandry and will pay $1,200 a' ILLINOIS APPEARS STRONG
ng at the University of I year for the expenses of the inves-
1927 Mrs. Shambaugh tigation. URBANA, Ill., August 8.-Native
position of Secretary of Prof. H. A. Ruehe, head of theiURBaNAsIl, Aegute8.nate
u of Appointments here, department of dairy manufactur- rlist of football players who will
has successfully held for ers, said attempts will be made to report for practice at the Univer-
wo years. produce the highest quality milk at of Io , Sptembe 16.vOut
a minimum cost. Transportation,ity of Illinois, September 16. Out
a minmum cst. Tanspatho' of the 61 men listed, 46 give state
ER'S BUYS efficiency of production, and other addresses.
factors will be considered. The rest are widely scattered, 13
AMIOWA-A new 16 page states in all being represented with
IOW.Aew1_pg booklet Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Ok-
entitled "The Quadrangle," has just lahoa hastach , and the
ation of the Graham been published by the university lahoma having two each, and the
book stores under the {be uishderynthe university others one apiece.
later's Book Stores, Inc., for use in advertising the university Lettermen are plentiful, 20 of
home for men. An attractive cover
rnced here today by Mar-p the 61 having won the coveted "I."
r of the Slater company. printed in four colors, red, brown, There is also a large crop of fresh-I
x wll ombne he woand purple, shows the entrance of
r will combine the twohe "Quad." men who hope to make a start to-
tores with the Slater ward a regular berth.

1
I

Read the
Summer Daily
Classified Ads!

TYPEWRITERS
RIBBONS
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.
Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
best quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

One thousand copies of the pam-I
tion of a stockholders' phlet have been printed and will
will take place, accord- be given out or mailed in answer!
Slater, and officers, will to inquiries received by the univer-
by the corporation. The sity. Twenty-four large half-tone
in will take place in the l cuts are included in the book, de-
picting the views of the home and
Graham and Slater con- of the surrounding campus.
been operating here for The book describes the home in
ears, Mr. Graham having words and in pictures. Details deal-
the J. V. Sheehan store ing with advantages of living con-
Myron E. Slater having ditions which are found there are
new store at about the explained. House rulings, sports,
and activities are all mentioned.

_

.

Ii_ h. al

University o McignPly
B y
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS
With introduction by Prof. LouisA.iStrauss and edited by Kenneth Thorpe
Rowe of the University of Michigan.
$-1.60

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See them before you buy elsewhere. No obligation.
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