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August 06, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-06

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THE WEATHER
Fair and Cooler.

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MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. X, NO. 37 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1929 PRICE FIVE CENTS

I

MORRISON SUVOESTS TO PILOT ZEPPELIN AROUND WORLD
DOUBLE TRAFFIC AlMS!

TO REDUCEACCIENt
CITES PARKING AND SPEEDIN
REGUATIONS AS AIDS
TO GAIN ENDS
27,000 PERSONS KILLED
Claims the No Left Turn Laws Ar
Wise But Usdess Unless
Subject To Study
In his lecture on Highway Traf-
fic Control yesterday afternoon i
the auditorium of the Natural Sci-
ence Building, Prof. Robert L. Mor-
rison of the Department of High-
way Engineering and Highwa3
Transport spoke of the twofolk
aims of traffic. "Sometimes thes
objectives are reached at the se
time, as in parking regulations
and sometimes they enter intC
conflict with each other througl
speed rules," Professor Morrison
stated.
Some rather illuminating statis-
tics presented by Professor Morri-
son stress rather vividly the gravity
of the traffic problem. In 192
there were 27,000 people killed in
automobile accidents, or about as
many people as there are living in
the city of Ann Arbor. Since about
35 people were injured to every
one killed, there were approximate-
ly 1,000,000 casualties last year. In
other words, if in every block in
Ann Arbor there were a hospital
comparable to the University Hos-
pital, there still would not be suf-
ficient room to accomodate the
people injured.
Suggests Traffic Survey
According to Professor Morrison,
the proper methods for preventing
traffic fatalitiefs lie primarily in
scientific diagnosis or traffic survey.
Uniform traffic regulations enforc-
ed by a sane and impartial police
and court administration, wide pas-
ses, improved street layout, and the
cutting back of curves would sim-
plify matters immensely. Perhaps
one of the most prolific causes of
accidents is the no-left-turn law.
"There are a great many places
where a no left turn regulation is
very wise, but unless study is made
before and after the rule is applied,
not only to the intersection in
question but also to the adjacent
ones, there can be no assurance
that the matter will be remedied,"
the lecturer stated.
Condemns Guess Work
Proper driver's license laws,
wherein the feeble-minded, insane,
and confirmed drunkards would be
eliminated, would relieve the situa-
tion, and if traffic signal lights
and pavement markings were estab-
lished as the result of intelligent
study rather than guess work, the
number bf fatalities would be
greatly decreased," he intimated.
"Until we use a little scientific in-
vestigation instead of superstitious
faith, let us not forget that we still
live in a glass house," was one of
the significant statements in Pro-
fessor Morrison's lecture.
PRESENT FACULTY
CONCERT TONIGHT
As the closing concert on the Fac-
ulty Concert series hield under the
auspices of the School of Music,
Mme. Amelie Frantz and her son
Dalies Frantz, will present a com-
bined concert of voice and piano
music tonight at 8:15 o'clock in
Hill auditorium.
Mme. Frantz is a concert artist

from Boston and is possessed of a;
particularly fine dramatic soprano1
voice which has become the favor-
ite of Bostonian Symphony goers
through her position as soloist un-
der the Koussevitzky baton.
The program is as follows:
Pastorale and Capriccio-Scar-
latti, Variations and Fugue on a
Theme, Handel-Brahms, by Mr.
Frantz. Aria: "Care Selve," from!
"Atlanta" - Handel, Widmung -
Franz, Verborgenheit - Wolf, Al-
lerseelen--Strauss, Der Lenz- Hil-
dach, by Mrs. Frantz. Londonderry
Air-Grainger, Country Gardens-
Grainger, Blues-Wiener, Punch
and Judy Show-Goosens, Rigolet-

Dr. Hugo Eckener :of -he GmZp6

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PLAY PRODUCTION STAR'TS CASTING
FOR ORIGINAL PLAYS PRESENTATION
'disqualified it from consideration
"The Rockers," "The Joiners", and in the contest.
One Two-Act Drama, "They "The Rockers," by Mrs. Buchanan,}
Too" Comprise Offering ( who has been a student in the play
Pwriting courses in the Rhetoric de-
Play Production has begun cast- partment, is a charming comedy
ing on the three original plays, which involves three spinsters and
which have been announced for the love affairs of yesteryear. It is
production Tuesday of next week an exceedingly short play, of some
in Mendelssohn theater. 15 minutes' duration, and will serve
The plays have been scheduled as curtain-raiser to the bill.
aTha contiuatio oe hedorbe- Gives Mid-Western Milieu
as a continuation of the work be- < "They Too," by R. Leslie Askren,
gun earlier this year of cooperation is a study of representative Middle-
between the rhetoric department western life in a small town, where
which has organized a play writing the immemorial conflict arises
course and the producing unit in among the young people between
thamongethedyoungmpeoplehbetween
the speech department. The plays1 the boy's desire to escape into a
to be given are, "The Rockers," bymore vital environment and the
Mrs. R. B. Buchanan, "They Too," girl's natural efforts to create forf
by R. Leslie Askren, and "The Join- herself the domestic life. The play
ers," by Arthur M. Hinkley. is an effort at symbolic representa-
Casting has been begun in the tion by reducing particular situa-
case of "They Too," and will be be- tions and characters to the basic
gun shortly on "The Joiners" and universals.
"The Rockers." The production of "The Joiners," by Arthur M.
the bill is under the direction of Hinkley, is a satiric study of the
Professor Chester M. Wallace, visit- antics of the fraternal minded manf
ing head of the Play Production who finds himself chilled and lone-
department for the summer and ly in a world that is far too little
head of the department of drama organized into warm, close groups
at Carnegie Institute of Technology for human companionships. The
and of Mr. Valentine B. Windt, head fooleries this type of man commits
of the Play Production department. himself in the effort to cement the
Miss Helen Watier, graduate stu- bond of fellowship find brilliant
dent in the department, will direct and penetrating analysis in the
"They Too." lines and situations of this comedy
Campus Contest Results hit.
The movement for the produc- The presentation of this bill is

REV. HEAPS 0DEELOPSi
CONVOCATION SERMN
ON TOLSTOI'S STORY
EXPECTS TO CONTINUE SUNDAY
CONVOCATIONS DURING
SCHOOL YEAR
TELLS NOVELIST'S LIFE
Applies Phosophy of "Redemption
Through Sacrifice" to Modern
Civilization
Although planned as an experi-
ment the Convocation service pres-
enting Tolstoy's "Reurrection"
Sunday evening in the Lydia Men-
delssohn theater was received with
appreciation sufficient to justify
the continuation of similar services
by the Student Chrisian Associa-
tion. Its success was its being
built around the central theme of
the "Resurrection," but still more
to the vivid interpretation of that
theme by Reverend Allison Ray
Heaps, of the Congregational
church.
Sketches Toystoy's Life
As preparation for his analysis
of the moral taught by the "prophet
of the simple life," Rev. Heaps
sketched briefly the life of Tolstoy,
showing the long struggle of the
man who though born an aristocrat
became obsessed with the question
of the meaning of life, and set forth
to solve it. Years of repeated dis-
illusion as each rainbow he chased
failed to present the pot of gold
did not dishearten him, and at
length, in the Sermon on the Mount
he professed to have found his
answer.
But it did not bring the rest he
sought, and though he lived his
creed of brotherhood, good will, and
faith among the peasants, he was
haunted by the hopeless state of
his country until death brought
him the escape he could not find
in life. In "Resurrection" he gave ,
the world a, summary of his philo-
sophy of life, redemption through
sacrifice.
Shows Colored Slides !
The unfolding of the story was
more striking by the colored slides)
adapted from the motion picture,,
and Rev. Heaps' well worded com-'
ments and keenly analytical dis-
cussion of the philosophy portrayedi
by the story gave it a deeper sig-
nificance for all those who heard
him.
The words which Rev. Heaps ap-
plied to the forepart of the service!
might well be extended to include
the whole-that nothing but the
presence of an organ could have;
added to the atmosphere of devo-
tion and reverence.-
PLAYERS WILL PRESENT
ARTHUR PINERO COMEDY

Dr. James B. Sc
Professor of internatio
Georgetown Unive4ity
Foreign Service, who has
pointed president of the
conciliation between P
Denmark.
BRITAIN HOLDS
PLAN GROSSLY

(By Associated Press)
LAKEHURST, N. J., August 5-"
Earthbound for a few hours, the
mighty German air-liner Graf Zep-
pelin, rested in the naval hangar
here today while workmen prepar-
ed her for her round the world
flight, which begins Wednesday,
and officers, crew, and passengers
extolled her virtues.
ott , Dozens of workmen crawled over
nal law at the big! silver covering of the Graf,
School of repairing the damage caused as she
s been ap- buffetted the winds in her 95 hour
e board of voyage from Germany that ended
gland and, on the naval reservation here last
night. Meanwhile other crews were
--- pumping fuel and hydrogen into
her tanks.
The greatest of caution was tak-
en as the workmen scurried about
their task. No one was allowed to
ascend the iron stairs to the up-
per floor of the hangar, unless they

ARBITRATOR

ZEPPELIN IS, MOORED
WHILE WORKMEN GET
READY FORNEXT HOP
PASSENGERS PRAISE F I(GHT
ACROSS OCEAN: TlfP"VE
TO CIRCLE GLOBE
FILL BAG WITH ETHANE
No Smoking Allowed in HngArs;
All Shoes Encased ;n Ra bbr
To Prevent Sparks

Expect Dawes Plan To Be Replaced
by Young Plan at Hague
Conference;
FIGHT FOR MODIFICATION
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, August 5- The view
held in British official quarters is

wore rubber soled shoes as pre-
caution against a spark being
struck off near the gas-filled bag
of the Zeppelin. Hand pumps were
used for the fuel lines, there be-
ing danger of sparks from electric-
ally driven pumps. Smoking was
not allowed in or near the hai-
gar.
Seven hundred and fifty thous-
and cubic feet of ethan ne c ill

that teHuCnene hhiul 'C'~llull gas wii
that the Hague Conference wh ch. be pumped into the Graf's tanks to
opens tomorrow will see the Dawes replace the Blau.gas used on the
Plan for Reparations which has westward trip. The ship will need
worked most successfully for five ,531,000 cubic feet of hydrogen to
,years, replaced by the Young Plan replace the lost lifting gas. In ad-
which is held to be of the first dition, five tons of gasoline will be
importance for European Peace ha- placed aboard. The task is expect-
bilitation. ed to be completed by three o'clock
The policy of the British delega- Tuesday afternoon.
tion as indicated in Parliament and Dr. Hugo Eckener, supervised part
elsewhere by its principal members, of the work. The Zeppelin's mo-
Foreign Minister Henderson and tors, he announced, were in per-
Chacellor of the Exchequer, Philip fect condition.
Snowden will be to seek two ends. Passengers for the eastward jour-
An attempt will be made to obtain ney of the Zeppelin nearly all have
complete evacuation of the Rhine- been selected. The Hamburg,
land if possible without substiut- American Line, New York Agens
ing anything hurtful to German! of the Zeppelin Company, was al-
sentiment such as a Committee of lotted three berths for the round-
Control proposed by France. A the-world trip, and six additional
stubborn fight will be made for berths from Lakehurst to Friedrich-
some modification of the Young shauf en.
Plan in respect to its allocation of The three round the world reser-
annuities among the different cred- i vations have been assigned. n
itors of Germany. goes to Joachim Rickard of BJS Lo
Mr. Snowden has denounced the who was a passenger on the Grai s
Young Plan allocation as ' grossly westward flight, and another is Otto
unfair to Great Britain and an Hillig, a'photographer of Liberny,
unacceptable departure from the New York.; the name of the thir"

i

tion of original student-written
plays began this winter when the
Division of English sponsored aI
campus-wide one-act competitionI
among the students. Professors O.
J. Campbell, K. T. Rowe, and Val-
entine B. Windt were the judges of
the MSS submitted. Elimination

performances were given the plays
during the last weeks of the first
semester and the first weeks of the
second semester, with the final per-
formance before professional judges
!of dramatic technique. Miss Jessie
Bonstelle, Director of the Detroit
Civic Theater, Prof. Wallace of
Carnegie Technology, and Mr.
Daniel L. Quirk, Director of the
Ypsilanti Players, were the judges.
Out of this competition the judges
awarded first prize to "The Joiners"
by Arthur M. Hinkley. The parti-
cipants in this competition were
colected in .book form: "Plays of
the University of Michigan," under,
the editorship of Prof. Rowe and
were published by Mr. George
Wahr.
The second semester saw a full
length play contest sponsored by
the division of English of which the
prize winners have been scheduled
for production early in the fall of
the regular school year. These are
"City Hall," by W. R. Thurnau, and
"Leila," by Dorothy Lyon Acker-
man. "They Too" was submitted in
this contest and was adjudged

the culminating effort of the Play I"Trelawny of the Wells," by A. percentages fixed at Spa. He con- was not disclosed. Lady Drum-
Production group which attempts W. Pinero will be the final and tends that France and Italy have mond Hay who had booked pas-
to provide profitable instruction by most pretentious offering of the preferred positions and that Eng- sage from Freidrischaufen will
actual performance in plays for a Summer Session season by Play land's share is insecure. leave from Lakehurst.
large number of teachers of the Production's Repertory Players.
drama who have enrolled in the Beginning at 8:15 o'clock tomorrow
University from High Schools night in the Lydia Mendelssohn ELIZABETH BISHOP SUPPORTS
throughout the state. theater, Pinero's period comedy
will be presented each night at the
same hour during the rest of the
PROF. BRUMM TO LECTURE week. FDITOR'S NOTE-This is the seventh of a ty members can do for students.
series of interviews with prominent women on
ON ADVERTISING METHODS No expense is being spared in the campus concerning their views on the forth. It is necessary that there be con-
staging this play. A views will appear from time to time during the tact between he old students and
This afternoon at 5 o'clock in tumes are being designed by Miss remainder of the summer session. the new, in order to give the latter
the auditorium of the Natural Elizabeth Schrader of the Carnegie "There are two strong reasons the training they do not get when
Science Building, Professor John L. Institute of Technology, and are for my approval of dormitories," j they meet their fellow-students
Brumm, Professor of Journalism being executed in the finest ma- stated Miss Elizabeth Bishop, pro- only in the class rooms," Miss
here, will lecture on "The Strategy terials by Play Production students. fessor of Latin at Western College Bishop said.
of Advertising." Due to the great This play was presented on the) for Women, at Oxford, Ohio, in an "No less does this contact aid in
advertising campaigns that are road in 1927 by one of the greatest j interview yesterday. Miss Bishop training the older students," Miss
continually attracting the atten- casts of stars ever assembled, in- is a sister of Dr. William W. Bishop, Bishop added. "Ths association
ion of magazine readers, and be- cluding John Drew, Peggy Wood, librarian of the University and head does much toward promoting inter-
cause of the increased number of Rollo Peters, Mrs. Whiffen, Otto of the Department of Library Sci- class feeling, one of the great
signs bordering our highways, this Kruger, Effie Shannon, and Helen ence. things in college life.
subject should prove of general in- Gahagen. "The first reason is that dormi- "In large groups, the individual
terest. The general public is in- tories foster greater loyalty to the ' must learn to conform to the will
vited. BASEBALL SCORES university. When a new student of the group. In dormitories, more-
comes, she is not familiar with the, over, the shy girl is brought out
TO ALTER LEAGUE THEATER (By Associated Press) ideals and traditions of her college, i and developed, since there are al-
American League and learns of them only through ways those who will, through their
As soon as the Lydia Mendel- Washington 21, Detroit 5. her association with otheil who influence, aid her in adjustment to
ssohn theater in the League build- St. Louis 6-7, Philadelphia 4-8.- have already attended the school. conditions," Miss Bishop concluded.
ing is closed, construction work will Second game, 12 innings. In this case, it is the large dormitory Miss Bishop has lived in dormi-
be done to remedy the arrang'e- iroup which teaches her" Miss 1toies for a nhirfh

4

ment of lines in the counter-weight
system, Miss Amy Loomis, director
of the theater, announced today.
This rearrangement will widen the

National League
New York 11, Pittsburgh 10.
Philadelphia 7, Cincinnati 6.
Boston 5, St. Louis 0.

-ji y.! - - - - - - - - -'.' a..--...... "'.* s,*G* V **tLI*Gl u1 a 1JJ L o MJ1JIJLu
Bishop explained. as a student and as a teacher. Her
"The second reason is that life! familiarity with the life of the
in a dormitory contributes to the student in the dormitory has given
training and refinement of the her the opportunity to formulate

I

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