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August 01, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-01

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TFURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THESUMERMICIGN DILYPAE TRE

ILLINOIS WILL ENGAGE
ARMY AND MICHIGAN ON
FALL GRIDSCHEDULE!
MICHIGAN HOME COMING GAME
SLATED FOR OCTOBER
AT URBANA
ZONE SYSTEM IS ADOPTED
All Applications for Army Game
Will Be Mailed; Student and
Public To Be Limited
URBANA, Ill., Aug. 1.-Assurance
that there will be a large chunk
of tickets for the Army football
game Nov. 9 available to the pub-
lic is given by C. E. Bowen, ticket
manager, as he prepares to mail
University 0 oIllinois application
cards and information to nearly
40,000 persons.
By limiting applicants in the Army
public sale to two tickets each,
Manager Bowen explained, it is
hoped to gain a fair distribution
among friends of the university
instead of permitting large blocks
to be gobbled up by a comparative-
ly few.
Army tickets will be sold by mail
only at the Urbana office alone.
Since each student will also be
limited in the number, of Army
tickets he may obtain, Manager
Bowen advises fans to order direct
instead of entrusting the job to a
student relative or friend.
Cards and information will be
delivered in the state of Illinois
about August 11, it us expected.
This material is mailed under a
zone system by which the first let-
ters are sent to those who live the
farthest, the object being to give all
a chance to get their orders back
to the office at the same time.
All purchasers last season and
others who have asked to have
their names placed on the per-.
manent mailing lst will receive
the cards and information which
also will be mailed to banks and
newspapers.
There will be no increase in the
price for the Army game, this re-
maining at $3, the usual conference
charge. There will be no limit on
the numnber of tickets which may
be ordered for the Michigan and
Chicago games. There will be no
reserved seats for the Kansas and
Bradley games for which the ad-
mission is $1.50. The complete
schedule is as follows:
Oct. 5-Kansas at Illinois, (Boy
Scout day.)
Oct. 12-Bradley at Illinois,
Oct. 19-Iowa at Iowa City.
Oct. 26-Michigan at Illinois -
(Homecoming).
Nov. 2-Northwestern at Evanston.
Nov. 9-Army at Illinois.
Nov. 16-Chicago at Illinois-(Dad's
Day).
Nov.23-Ohio State at Columbus.1

PLANS PAJAMA PROMENADE

'GLFIG IS POPULAR
SPORT AMONG WOMEN
"Golfing is still holding first place
in woman's sports," according to
Miss Alice Evans, Assistant Profes-
sor of Physical Education. "It is
the most popular branch of the
woman's physical education de-
partment this summer."
"Tennis runs a close se-ond al-
though there are many girls play-
ing golf and tennis both, without
receiving credit for it." There are
many students in graduate school,
where no credit is given for ath-
letic activity, who are indulging in
these sports. Classes in beginning
golf are especially popular; and
much outside work is done in both
branches.
No formal organization of wo-
man's sports is evident during the
summer as in winter aside from
the regular class groups, and the
short summer session does not per-
mit meets or tournaments.
Besides those already mentioned
are classes in swimming and danc-
ing. Dancing consists of folk danc-
ing, clogging and natural dancing.
At 2 o'clock, Thursday, August 1,
I the dancing classes are meeting to
give a program as the summation
of the work for the summer.
Airport Improvement
Work IsUnderway
With 800 yards of gravel remain-
ing of the 2,000 yards obtained for
improvement of Ann Arbor air-
port, considerable work on a sec-
ond runway can be done, it was
stated today by Eli A. Gallup, parks
superintendent. The east-west
runway has already been complet-
ed, and the additional gravel will
permit the start of work on a
south-east and north-west run-
way.
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of ma-
'chines. Our equip-
ment and person-
nel are considered
among the best in the State. The
result of twenty years' careful
building.
Q. D. MORRILL

C L A S S F I E LOST-Gold ring with brown tiger
eye cameo setting. Reward. Call
ADVRTIINGMary Kaufman 8817. 31, 32, 33
''YPEWRITING AND MIMEO-LOST--On State street between
GRAPHING promptly and neatly Huron and M. Hut, gold pin
done by experienced operators at one 21566. heirloom. Reward.
moderate rates. College work a j___Phone ______21566.____
specialty since 1908. E. D. LOST-A brown notebook with im-
O. D. MORRILL portant notes and two letters
17 Nickels Arcade with a brown pocketbook. Re-
ward. Call 4918.
THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY'
SHOP OFFERS A LOST-Dickinson's Excursions in
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00; Musical History. Phone 6654.
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561. Reward. 1217 Baldwin.
MACK TUTORING AGENCY TYPING
Open for Summer School TYPNG
310 S.. State St. Phone 7927 W A N T E D - English, French,
F~-~~N TG e rm a n , or Ita lia n . M rs. F . F .
FOR RENT TcA1ar D^A

s

FOR RENT-Forest near Hill; 141
rooms party furnished. 3 baths.!
Double garage. Phone 5740.
FOR RENT-Large one-room com-
pletely furnished apartment forj
two girls or young couple. Also
newly decorated double for girls.
422 E. Washington. Dial 8544 or,
9714.
FOR RENT- Unfurnished apart-
ments-upper and lower. Southeast
section. Modern. Call 5929.
LOST
LOST-Orange Sibraffer fountain
pen in main library, July 29.
Leave at library desk or call

i e , 42 b. Division. Phone
6946. 32, 33, 34, 35, 36
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
WANTED-At once, an agrecrive
salesman for new business. Exo
cellent opportunities for a pro-
ducer. For information and in-
terview write, Box 209.
Classified Ads
Bring Results

Undaunted by gibes, W. O. Saunders, Elizabeth, N. C., editor and
advocate of cooler clothing for men, walks through New York streets
in pajama outfit with which he has been startling his home town.

21456.

s a ww e : w 9 ! iTr4 7 7 a^V Oft

,,. _ ,..

LEAGUE MEETINGS Stewart Recommends
ARE EXPERIMENT Check On Production
The convocation to be held at 8 Abolishment of the use of radium
p. m. August 4, in the Lydia Men- paint for making luminous dials on
delssohn theater, is sponsored by watches and clocks has been rec-

the Students' Christian Association
as an experiment in the attempt to
find some sort of religious service
which will appeal to the majority
of students.
"These summer services are pre-
liminary to a series which the S. C.-
A. is contemplating for next fall,"
said Chester Bennett, secretary of
the organization. "Many types of
programs appealing to the varied
interests of the students will be
studied and attempted. The thea-
ter in the League building is an
ideal place in which to give these
services. Its atmosphere con-
tributes much to them."'
The Reverend Allison Ray Heaps,
who will talk on Tolstoi's "Resur-
rection" next Sunday night, has
made a hobby of selecting certain
scenes from well-known moving
pictures and having them colored.
He has traveled several summers
for Chautauqua, showing the slides
and telling the story in his own
words. He has now been in Ann
Arbor approximately a year as the
pastor of the Frst Congregational
church at Williams and State
streets. An attempt will be made
Sunday by Rev. Heaps and the S.
C. A. to organize a service which
will be built around the theme of
Tolstoi's story, namely, "The resur-
rection of a soul into a higher life
through penitence and sacrifice."

ommended in a bulletin on radium
poisoning by Ethelbert Stewart,
commissioner of the Labor de-
partment's bureau of statistics. He

I

suggested that importation might
well .be prohibited at once, and
then a mutual agreement for its
abolition be secured in the United
States.
From an inspection of 31 estab-
lishments in which 253 workers
were directly subjected to possible
harmful exposure to its effects, a
total of 23 fatalities and 19 living
cases were found, apparently thel
result of poisoning from radium.

t--
-e -
CANOELG
Every Afternoon and Evening
Saunders' Can he oetivery
On the Huron River at the foot of Cedar St.

17 Nickels Arcade

Phone 6615

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The New Fall Line of

Announcing---

That the popular J. and K. Foot-
Saver Shoes are handled exclusively
by MACK & Co. New advance Fall
styles are here in the latest shades and
combinations.
A wide range of styles to select
from as well as complete assortment of
widths and sizes.
Main Floor
4-

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See this new selection of Fall Suits.
Select shadings and designs.

U

X40

a

$45
Two Trousers

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$ 50

SA

'ELIA!B
"Opposite Michigan Theatre"

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