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July 31, 1929 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-31

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PAGE FOUR

I

THE SUMMER MICHI- V': DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY, 31, 1929

.. Y

DAILY O'FFIC IAL BULLETIN
Publicaton in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean
of the Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. (11:30 a.
m. Saturday).
VOL. IX WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 1929 No. 36

i'

GRAPHIC VIEWS OF ZEPPELIN INTERIOR

i
i
i

W A H R COMPILES
ROOMING H O U S E
REPORT OF YEAR
Figures released yesterday from
the office of the Dean of Students
reveal that 2,608 rooms were in-
spected by the University service
during the academic year, 1928-29,
r'~U of 104 iAA .,rle. a rorl moms-

Excursion to Put-in-Bay:
The Put-in Bay excursion party will leave for Detroit by special
interurban from the corner of Packard and State Streets at 6:30 a. m.,,
Saturday, August 3. At Detroit the group will take the boat for Put-in-
Bay-a thre hour trip down the Detroit River and out into Lake Erie.
Four hours on the island will allow ample time for luncheon, a visit
to the caves, to Perry's monument, and to other points of interest. The
party will be back in Ann Arbor at 10:30 p. m. Expenses, including
luncheon and dinner, will total about $4.00. Reservations should be
made by Friday, 5 p. m., in room 2051, Naturalt Science Building, with
Miss Wilson.
J. P. Rowe
Book Exhibit:
The Exhibit of illustrated editions of classic and contemporary
books for juveniles from pre-school to high-school age will be continued
through August 1st, in room 1203 University High School. The Exhibit
will be open from 11 to 12 a. m. and from 2:30 to 4:30 p. m., Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday, of this week. Those interested will please
see it during this time.
F. L. D. Goodrich, Associate Librarian
Trip to Zoological Garden:
We need a few people to go with the Natural Histroy Class to make
a special bus-load to Walbridge Park, Toledo, Monday, August 5. Fare!
will be about $2.50, round trip. Anyone wishing to go call call at room
4119 N. S. Tuesday, between 4 and 5 o'clock.
Harry W. Hann
Women Students:
All women students are invited to the tea this afternoon from 3:30
to 5:30 in, the Garden of the Women's League Building.
Dorothy Woodrow j
Educational Conference:
Professor W. J. Grinsted of the University of Pennsylvania will speak
on "Problem Motivation of the Traditional Subjects" at the University
High School at 4 o'clock today.
Thomas Diamond
French Teachers:
The third and last round table discussion meeting will take place
today, Wednesday, at 4:00 o'clock, room 108 RL. Teachers of French
are cordially invited.
H. P. Thieme

ui L tese, lauwere :snigie ti7,
932 double, 615 suites, and 21 triples.
Seven hundred and ninety houses
were inspected, but of this number
only 692 were found up to the
standard which the University re-
quires of an approved house. Nine-
ty-eight of the houses inspected
were not approved. During the
year, 275 approval cards were re-
voked.
A census of houses for students
showed 103 light housekeeping
rooms and apartments listed; 40
houses; 23 houses with accommo-
dations for 15 or more, 71 for 10-15
students, 191 or 6-10 roomers, 167
housing 4-6 persons, and 294 for
I four or less.
The average price for a single
room was found to be $4.81; for a
'double, $4.14 each, and $4.85 each
for those occupying suites. Apart-
ments of from two to . six rooms
rented at $30 to $60 per month. En-
tire houses brought a monthly rent
of $40 to $165.
IOWA.-An importation of color-
ed models of plant roots, leaves,
and a tree trunk was received re-
the gon- cently from Germany by the botany
department.

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$Wetw Staer,.
N re taeewUin1 3 ;bu5 ;~ro Seeom

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Germany's transatlantic dirigible, hurst, N. J., the first week in Aug.
the Graf Zeppelin, is scheduled to The views show staterooms, kitch-
sail across the Atlantic to Lake- en, dining room, and pilot house.

The lower diagram is
dola proper.

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Certain Women Can Succeed
Especially In Research,

In Engineering,
Says Dean Sadler

HALLERS
STATE STREET JEWELERS
At Liberty Street

MICHIGAN HAS NE
GIFTS, SA
"Michigan is not rich in scholar-
ships in the sense of outright gifts
in recognition of character, ability,
and contribution to the University
life, but it is amply provided with
funds for scholarship loans to wo-
men," said Miss Grace Richards,
adviser of women, in an interview
yesterday.
"From time to time interested
people have left bequests or made
gifts to the University specifying
that the interest from them should
be available as loans to the new
students. There are 22 such funds.
Some designate that the borrower
shall be of a particular school; for
example, the Florence Huson Fund
is directed for the use of women
in medicine, the Alice Freeman
Palmer Fund for women of the
graduate school, the Nurses' schol-
arship Loan Fund and so on.
"The funds are designed for aid
of seniors and graduates, although
a few make loans available to jun-
fors, and under extraordinary cir-
cumstances applications of sopho-
mores are considered. It is cus-
tomary to require that. a woman
shall have matriculated a year be-
fore she applies. Since they are
scholarship loans, an acceptable

ED OF MORE
YS MISS RICHARDS1
scholastic record is required. The1
Committee on student loans has;
learned that repayment on the
partial payment plan of $10 perI
month works no hardship to the
borrower and almost eliminates de-1
linquency. The first payment is
due not later than 6 months after
graduation or after leaving school.
The notes draw interest at the rate i
of 3 per cent per year if paid when
due; 6 per cent on past duel
amounts.
"The report for the year from #
June 1, 1928 to June 1, 1929 showsl
that 82 loans were made amount-
ing to a total of $13,275. The in-
dividual loans range in amount
from $500 to $25. From June 1 un-
til the present 10 loans totalling
$1,275 have been made. Previous
to 1923 only 55 loans had been made
altogether. In 1924 the record
shows 23.
"The cumulative good which a
loan fund accomplishes is remark-
able," continued Miss Richards.
"For example, the Lucinda Hins-
dale Stone fund established in 1904
by the Michigan State Federation
of Wofnen's Clubs has furnished
loans to 188 women, amounting to
$25,000. Of this number 35 are
still outstanding; no loans are over-
due.

"Certain types of women can
very well go into engineering,"
Dean H C. Sadler, of the Engineer-
ing college, states "especially into
the office and research work." He
said further that the women who
go into engineering do not ask to
be excused from the shop work.
"The greatest drawback is that
engineering requires a great deal of
practical experience," said the dean,
"sometimes in very remote and
dangerous places and women are
generally physically incapable of
working under such conditions
"In the specific fields of mathe-
matics, physics, chemistry, and ap-

plied mechanics women can go far.
Last year there were three women
in the engineering school, Barbara
Rowe and Camilla Hubel, both sec-
ond year chemistry students, and
Frances Webb, a freshman. There
are -no women in the engineering
college this sumier, although there
are fourteen in the School of Arch-
itecture.
"Engineering is a progressive
study," Dean Sadler concluded his
remarks. "It always has its eye
on the future. The scientific ex-
periments and discoveries of today
are practically applied in tomor-
row's engineering projects."

Repairing

Watches

Jewelry

SPECIAL ORDER WORK

T

r

WUERT H

r

Last Times
Today

III

His Iby
Conquest!
Men whipped to fighting
fury by the charms of a
desert siren!
Appointments
"MATCH MAKING
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Blue Bird Hair Shop
WE SPECIALIZE IN LADIES' HAIR
BOBBING

A NOVELTY
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NEWS
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Call 9616 and make an appointment to have your
hair trimmed to suit your features by Mr. Bartlett,

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COMING
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VOLTAGE
with
WILLIAM
BOYD

III,

The great stage mystery
play is now an even
greater all-talking pic-
turel Directed by the
famous author with a
superb cast, it makes
each- seat a front-row
seat to the Trial of the
Cenutry!

with

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A
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ALL TALKMG
PICTJ RE

NORMA
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H.B.
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Trial ofv
DUAN

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STONE
RAYMOND
HACKETT

formerly with the J. L. Hudson Co.
TONIGHT
at
Box Office Open 10-9
Phone 6300
TICKET 75c

READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

Written and directed by
BAYARD VEILLER
Continuity by Becky Gardiner

I

mmm
avmm

1,

Presen

PLAY PRODUCTION'S
MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
t Craig's Wil
BY GEORGE KELLY
TONIGHT, THURSDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

fe

NO
SHOW
FRIDAY

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