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July 31, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-31

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THE WEATHER
Fair and warmer.

ii'u mmr r

l~lrbgau

1atu

MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. X, No. 32 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 1929 PRICE FIVE CENTS

SAINT LOUIS

ROBIN

LANDS

AFTER

420.

HOURS

MISS JACOBS WINS
AT I.N VITATIONALSi
SWAMPS ANNE PAGE, MARTHA
GLADMAN TO DEFEND
LAURELS

FORD SPENDS 66T1
QUIETLY Ah
Receives Boquet of American Beauty
Roses from Girl Employees
of Laboratory
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, July 31.-Although he
entered his 66th year today, Henry
Ford cares to take no special no-
tice of the occasion. Instead he
passed the day quietly as the
others.
Breakfast at his home, a visit
to his laboratory at Dearborn, and
then the remainder of the morning
at the. antique village he is building
as a museum of early America con-
stituted Mr. Ford's routine.
Returning to his laboratory at
noon he received what is believed
to have been his one birthday gift.
A 'bouquet of 66 American Beauty
roses from the girl employees in
the engineering laboratories.
Mr. Ford then posed for a pic-

H BIRTHDAY
N4D WITH NO POMP
ture and went home for lunch. He
left during the afternoon for East
Orange, N. Y., where he is to as-
sist Thomas A. Edison in picking a
successor to the electrical wizard
from 40 boys nominated from all
parts of the country.
66 Years Old

WON TITLE LAST
YEAR WITH

EASE

Oxford and Cambridge Entrants
Are Eliminated Leaving Only 2
Foreigners on Courts
(By Associated 'Press)
SEABRIGHT, N. J., July 31-
Losing only five games in two
matches Miss Helen Jacobs ad-
vanced majestically today in the
semi-final round of the Seabright,
Invitation Tennis tournament in
which she is defending her laurels
won last year.
After swamping Miss Anne Page
of Philadelphia, 6-0 and 6-2, Miss
Jacobs defeated a fellow Califor-
nian, Miss Martha Gladman, 6-0,
6-3.
When play in the women's sin-
gles is resumed on Thursday, Miss
Jacobs will meet Miss Margy Mor-
rill of Dedham, Mass., who defeated
Miss Alice Francis of Orange, N. J.,
6-4, 6-1, in the third round.
Miss Jacobs Ranks Second
In the other half of the draw two
more invaders from the far west
came through to give California
three of the four semi-final breaks,
Miss Edith Cross of San Francisco,
trimming Miss Dorothy Andrus of
Yonkers, N. Y., and Miss A. Harper,
another San Franciscoan trouncing
Miss Evelyn Parsons of Palo Alto,
Calif., 6-2, and 6-3.
In the national women's ranking
list Miss Jacobs is seceond, Miss
Cross, third, Miss Morell, sixth and
Miss Harper, eighth, and it is in
about that order the surviving big
four are favored.
Without any denominating in-
dividual figure the race for tourna-
ment honors in the men's division
waxed hotter today as the field
narrowed down to eight survivors.
Only two foreign players were
among this number as the Oxford
and Cambridge University entrants
were turned back out of three and
four engagements, and only M. G.
Farquharson of Cambridge remain-
ed with Sadakavuonda of Japan to
supply an international angle, Far-
quharson, a veteran of Davis Cup
plays, as a representative of South
America, defeated Watson Wash-
burn the former internationalist
6-3, 5-7, 6-4.
Bell Wins
Russell Young, New Zealander,
who captains the Oxford-Cam-
bridge forces, was turned back de-
cisively, however, by Richard M.
Williams one time Davis Cup dou-
ble partner of Washburn.
England's two other reverses
came when John Boeg, eighth rank-I
ing merican player, who defeated
Paul De !Ricou, young French stu-'
dent at Oxford, and D. Gregory
Mangin of Newark, N. J., downed
E. R. Avory of Cambridge, 8-6, 6-4.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
American League
Philadelphia 5, Detroit 4.
New York 7, Chicago 3.
Cleveland 11, Boston 4.
Washington 11, St. Louis 9.
Nationid League
Chicago 4, Boston 0.'
New York 3, Cincinnati 0.
Philadelphia 13, Pittsburgh 5.

Work on the redecoration of the
main reading room of the library
which was begun about a week ago
by men from the paint shop of the
buildings and grounds department
-of the University has been pro-
gressing satisfactorily. A Telescop-
ing Tower scaffolding has been set
up in lieu of the ordinary scaffold-
ing, in order to enable the men to
reach the lofty ceiling.
This new moveable type of scaf-
:folding which was secured from a
Chicago firm is intended especially
for interior work of this kind and
lhas obvious advantages over the
old immovable type which was con-
structed for a single job after which
it was torn down.
Only the apse on the western end
of the reading room has been given
the requisite three coats of cream
paint. The sides will be finished in
:a four tone color scheme designed
to convey the impression of blocks
-of grey stone.
It is expected that the work will
be completed by October first, the
date set for the opening of classes
in the fall.

Henry Ford
MORE SERVICE PAY
WASHINGTON, July 31.-The in-
terdepartmental payboard today
recommended substantial pay in-
creases all long the line for com-
missioned and enlisted' men in the
service.
The announcement came as the
general staff of the Army acting
under the orders from President
Hoover and Secretary Good begin-
ning its survey of Army expendi-
tures with the aim of eliminating
all unnecessary items, if any, from
the war department budget.
First responsibility for curtailing
the military expenses has been
placed upon the army itself.

EIGHT PERCENT OF PEOPLE
ENGAGED IN AUTNOM0TIVE
MANUFACTURING
PRiCES DECREASE
SINCE WORLD WAR
Griffin Thinks Foreign Market Holds
Key To Future of Expansion
In Production Field
"Eight percent of the gainfully
employed people in the United
States are engaged in the manufac-
ture of automobiles," stated Dean
Clare E. Griffin of the School of
Business Administration in his lec-
ture yesterday afternoon on "Econ-
omics of the Automobile Industry."
One of the chief reasons for tre-
mendous growth of the automobile
industry is the development of
various types of labor-saving mach-
inery in recent years. At the pre-
sent time each worker has, on the
average, between five and six thou-
sand dollars worth of machines to
assist him in the performance of
his tasks.
Study Mass Production
"A highly developed system of
management and the very careful
and minute study of the problem
of organizing workers in the most
effective manner have helped to
establish the prosperity of the
industry. Mass Production, util-
ized to the highest degree, has
brought within the realms of pos-
sibility high wages, low prices and
large profits. Automobiles are one
of the few things which cost less
at the present time than they did
before the war. .The combination
of high prices, low wages, and un-
precedented business prosperity
has made more impression upon
European countries than any other
factor of the American industrial
world. Numerous engineering com-
missions have been sent to this
country. to study the organization
of mass production in the manu-
facturing plants of the great motor
car companies," he stated.
Must Lower Tariff
The concentration of a large
volume o'f the total production in-
to the hands of not more than half
a dozen concerns and the central-
ization of the industry in one local-
ity has been possible through a
combination of factors which exist
only in this country, according to
Dean Griffin.
"The largest single market in the
world unhindered by tariff barriers
such as confront foreign competi-
tors, low freight rates, uniform
laws, customs and language are
favorable circumstances which
have assisted the tremendous
growth of the motor industry.
"The foreign market will becoie
an increasing factor in future ex-
pansion," he predicted. In order to
be able to take the fullest advant-

age of the possibilities of the for-
eign market it is becoming appar-
ent to American manufacture.Is
that the lowering of tariff of for-
eign cars will be an important step
towards gaining access to that
field.
"Craig's Wife" To Be
Next For Play Class
Play Production's Michigan Rep-
ertory Players will open their sixth
offering of the Summer Session at
8:15 o'clock tonight in the Lydia
Mendelssohn theater, the play this

N. Y. MAYOR?
RECORD BY MORE
THAN SEVEN DAYS'
SHIP MAKES PERFECT DESCENT
AS 15,000 PERSONS CROWD
FLYING FIELD
JACKSON O'BRINE
rDESCEND AT 7:38
Employees of Curtis Field Thwart
Attempts To Rush Plane
after Landing
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
Fiorella H. La Guardia ST. LOUIS, July 30-The St.
Who is generally regarded as the Louis Robin descended to 200
choice of the Republican conven- feet at 7:35 p. m. Central stan-
chieo h eulcncne-dard time. The pilots Dae
tion to vie with Mayor Jimmy Wal- Jackson and Forest O'Brine sig
ker, Tammany candidate, in the naled that they were going to
mayoarlty election' in New York ld.th e oigRo
City in November. Both men are land. The' St. Louis centra
f wets. standard time.
The end of the record smashing
endurance flight of the St. Louis
Robin came at 7:38 o'clock cen-
tral standard time tonight when its
pilots Dale "Red" Jackson and 'For-
est O'Brine descended from the sky
which had been their home for 420
Visiting Forida Professor Claims hours, 21 minutes. They exceeded
That Social and Moral Traits the record of the Angelo by seven
Are Results full days at 2:01 p. m. today.
The plane made a perfect land-
SEES INTERESTS GROW ing in the middle of the field with
about 15,000 spectators watching
Asserting that character educa- them. The crowd rushed in the
tion is an altogether feasible thing, field but a crowd of employees of
Dr. Joseph Roemer, visiting educa- the Curtiss Robertson Co., spon-
tion professor, from the University sors of the flight, protected Jack-
of Florida, in his address at one son and O'Brine.
of the regular 4 o'clock assemblies The St. Louis Robin was towed
of the School of Education, declar- into a space beside a hangar. The
ed that "it is necessary to 'job, I field was muddy from a rain storm
analyze' the task in order to ac- that began late today, where dur-
complish definite, specific results. ing the long flight in the air the
"All through the years," Dr. Roe- dust was inches thick.
mer said, "we have been teaching'
the subjects of the curricula relig- ST. LOUIS, July 30-The endur-
iously, hoping that by some means ance flight of the monoplane St.
or other there would be a resultant Louis Robin was nearing a close to-
of character as a concomitant of night with the 18-day test of the
learning. We have now reached stamina of man and motor decided
the place," he continued, "where to end in a draw.
we are no longer willing to risk as Dale "Red" Jackson and Forest
a 'by-product' the chief function O'Brine, the pilots, announced in
of education. In the final analysis, a note they would send the plane
all curricula activities are means to earth at Lamberts St. Louis field
to an end," he pointed out, em- between 6 and 8 p. m. central stan-
phasizing that "they are not ends dard time after "using the fuel we
but means to the ends." These have here." They added that the
ends are those finer social and- motor was still running fine, but
moral traits of youth which we are that a stabilizer brace was about to
so anxious to develop. let go on the left side.
"The rapid growth of all extra Earlier in the day Major Wm. B.
curricular activities in our sec- Robertson, sponsor of the flight,
ondary schools is most encourag- had sent aloft a note requesting
ing." the flyers to land sometime today.
PLEASING PROGRAM PRESENTED
AT SUMMER FACULTY CONCERT

I

PREPARES FOR NEW LAURELS

Last night in Hill auditorium,
Mrs. Margaret MacGregor, organ-
ist, and Mr. Stanley Fletcher, pian-
ist, presented the next to the last,
program on the summer Facultyl
Concert Series.
Mrs. MacGregor's program was
very well balanced. The softness.
of'the Lento and Air by Gluck was
a direct contrast following the Wi-
dor number. Closing the first
group was the magnificent Prelude
and Fugue in E minor of Bach.
Tempered by fine shading, Mrs.
MacGregor's technical and inter-
pretive ability combined to produce
a delightful and artistic perform-
ance.
Seh i ii- ainh a e hopii i-iainrwrinv.t.

the past year; nevertheless Mr.
Fletcher's charming interpretation
of "Scenes from Childhood" was
very well received by an attentive
audience which gasped en masse to
hear their familiar "Traumerei"
coming out of this group under a
less familiar name. The two mod-
ern pieces "The Little White Don-
key" by Ibert and "At the Donny-
brook Fair" by Scott completed Mr.
Fletcher's share of the concert.
Owing to the fact that the con-
cert began some four or five min-
utes late of the scheduled hour,
half the audience felt it had ade-
quate grounds for hurrying out at
the end of the second group-- a
somewhat disconcerting sight for a

i Miss Dorothy Poynton
WinnsAvnf~rr rhA ..m-t i,.y rAa,~al,. ac. iit+ ofT ,-.c A napP n1c ,v r rna

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