100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 26, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGR TWM

THE.. SUMMER+ + Ma:vaaaGAiN \Lt11L 1 - - PAM TMR
" ...

'WORLDS GRE[AT
HAVE BEEN PAT
OF TPUPPETPRO.
VISIT OF TATTERMAN
RECALLS HISTORY
MARIONETTES

. ... , _ i i

MEN'
RHONSl
JECTS.
GROUP
OF

APPARATUS BROADCASTS MOVIES

i,

- "

sideline
Chatter,

INTRIGUEDPHILOSOPHERS
Shakespeare Contributed Two Plays
for Puppets; Johnson, Voltaire
Also Furthered Cause
"The King of the Golden River,"
a puppet show to be presented on
next Monday afternoon and eve-
ning at the Lydia AVndelssohn the-
ater, leads us to consider some-
thing of the history of marionettes.
Possessing, through the centur-
les of their existence, friendships
which include the names of num-
erous great men, the marionettes
today can boast of a patronage un-
surpassed by any other creations of
the theatrical world. Puppets have
furnished entertainment a n d
amusement since the days of Egyp-
tian power, and, though the names
of the first, great men to befriend
them are lost, we know that they
claimed the attention of rulers.
Among the Grecian friends of
the marionettes were Archimedes,
Socrates, and Plato. Each of these
men .had a different interest in
puppets. Archimedes delighted in
their mechanical operation; Socra-
tes liked to make them respond to
his questions as he would have men
respond; Plato saw in them the re-
presentatives of the serious things
of life.{
Rulers of India, China, and Ja-
pan befriended the marionettes.
And we know that Saladin, Charles
V of Spain, and Louis XIV of
France took an active interest in
their careers.
Had Literary Patronage
The puppets have no less en-
joyed literary patronage, drawing
their friends from the many coun-
tries of Europe. Greatest of all the
men of letters who contributed to
their repertoire was Shakespeare,
whose two plays, "A Midsummer
Night's Dream," and "Julius Cae-
sar," were written for marionettes.
Ben Jonson wrote 'Every Man in
His Humor" as a marionette play.
Voltaire, in France, befriended
the marionettes, after his first dis-
like for them was dispelled by ac-
tual contact through their manip-
ulation. In the end, short plays ex-
pressly for their use came from his
pen. Moliere, LaFontaine, and
Rousseau-all these men have left
indications of their friendships for
the little players. Maurice Maeter-
linck and Anatole France have car-
ried this friendship to our times.
Popular in Italy
In Italy, Goldoni, acknowledged
as the greatest Italian writer of
comedy, felt the influence of pup-
pets during his boyhood, for he
lived in Venice, where the name
of "niarionette" was first given to
these creatures. It was from the
performance of a puppet play,
which he wrote at the age of seven,
that Goldoni obtained his start in
:learning the art of playwriting, and
he readily acknowledged his debt
to the influence of the marionettes.
In Germany, Goethe was, so im-
pressed by a puppet show witnes-
sed in his childhood that he later
wrote a delightful account of the
ideas which the marionettes had
created in his youthful mind. The
story of these literry patrons of I
the puppets includes many such
names.
Musicians, too, employed their
arts in creations for the puppets.
Perhaps the best known of these
composers was Joseph Haydn,
whose, five toy symphonies, written

for marionette use, attest his sym-
pathy with them.

Dave Ward, who took care of the
number one position on the Wolver-
ine golf team this spring, continues
to remain monarch of this state's
amateur golfers at medal play. Thef
rangy Big Rapids star led the qual-
ifiers for the state amateur tourna-
ment for the third consecutive year.
In banging out a brilliant 71
Ward went out in front of the
field by a matter of 6 strokes.
This strong showing was a re-
sult of a 34, 2 under par on
the outgoing nine, and a 37 on
the second stretch.
The Wolverine star, in so doing,I
found himself within one stroke of

S F EFOR RENT- Unfurnished apart-
L'Fments-upper and lower. Southeast
Y aEWR MIME ( section. Modern. Call 5929.
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-I FOR SALE
GRAPHING promptly and neatly FOR SALE-Late Model T Ford
done by experienced operators at Sedan. Good tires. Excellent
moderate rates. College work a condition. Price $75. See owner
specialty since 1908. E. D. 540 Walnut. 28
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade LOST
THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY LOST-On State street between
SHOP OFFERS Aj Huron and M. Hut, gold pin
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00; valued as heirloom. Reward.
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561. Phone 21566.
MACK TUTORING AGENCY LOST-A brown notebook with im-
310 n.rtatemSt.Phoe 7927 portant notes and two letters
310 S. State St._ Phone 7927 with a brown pocketbook. Re-
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair ward. Call 4918.
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
LOST-Shaeffer's Life-time foun-
FOR tain pen without cap. Finder
_ENT kindly telephone 8069 at 730
FOR RENT--Forest near Hill; 14 Arbor Street. 22, 23, 24
rooms party furnished. 3 baths. LOST-Dickinson's Excursions in
Double garage. Phone 5740. Musical History. Phone 6654.
Reward. 1217 Baldwin.
FOR RENT-Large one-room com-i
pletely furnished apartment for WANTED
two girls or young couple. Also;l
newly decdrated double for girls. YOUNG MEN for advertising cam-
422 E. Washington. Dial 8544 or paign. 220 Nickels Arcade. Thurs-
9714. day from 1to 3. 0

A new era in radio broadcasting is foreshadowed by the tele-
vision transmitter shown above. Invented by C. Francis Jenkins in
his laboratory ten miles outside of Washington, D. C., near Silver
Springs, Md., it has made practical the sending of moving pictures
through the air. R. P. Battle, member of the laboratory's technical
staff, is shown with part of the complicated apparatus.
WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL SUFFRAGE
ALLIANCE TAKES PEACE MEASURES

On June 17, 400 registered dele-,
gates, from 40 countries, assembledl
in Berlin to celebrate the twenty-1
fifth anniversary of the Women'sl
International Suffrage alliance.
The meeting was devoted to dis-
cussing and formulating definite
recommendations on the following
questions: family allowances, the
extension of female suffrage in the
still unenfranchised countries, the
legal and social fate of the ille-4
gitimate child, equal conditions of
work for men and women, and
world peace.
In an article in the July 24th
issue of the New Republic maga-
zine, Ruth Morgan, one of the re-
presentatives from the United
States, said, "Besides a resolution
against poisonous gases in war, the
convention drew up a detailed sup-
port of a triple peace plan aiming
at general disarmament, the peace-

ful settlement of internatonal dif-
ficulties, and the eventual aboli-
tion of war."
The choice of Berlin as a meet-
ing place ended an anti-German
boycott of almost ten years and
promoted a friendly feeling be-
tween the hostesses and the mem-
bers of the alliance. An opera
and several plays were given to en-$
tertain the visitors, and many pri-
vate homes were opened to them.,
At the close of her article, Miss
Morgan said, "I have come back
from Berlin with the conviction
that the women of today are pre-
pared to play a constructive role
in the establishing of international
peace. I have seen them behave
with common sense and self-con-
trol and I believe that one war
wound has been helped to heal by
the faith of the women of the Al-
liance in the international welfare
of mankind."

equalling the competitive record on
ythe difficult Detroit Country Club, rE
layout. He narrowly missed tying I
this mark when his long put on the
eighteenth for a birdie three an ,-~-" d
a 70 jumped out after hitting the
back of the cup.
Floyd Fitzsimmons, who stag-
ed the Dundee-Fields welter-
weight championship match
last night at the new Fair
grounds arena in Detroit, has
both the challenger and the
champion tied up in -an agree-
ment which gives him exclusive
right for their services for a
period of 90 days within which
time Fitz must name a suita-
ble opponent for another title
offense.
Jimmy McLarnin has accepted
terms offered by the Detroit pro-
moter but the bout whether or not
it involves Larnin must be staged%
in the course of within 90 days,
at the expiration of which time,t On
the agreement with Fields and te
Dundee becomes void.

.. rrr.ozerr

0.0

%./

ANOEING
,very Afternoon and Evening
rlers' CanoeLiver y
Hiuron River at the foot of Cedar St.

D THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

=00irrrW.

0

1
____

i
V

i

i

I ~NES F ROM OT
IOWA-Students of the second
term of university summer work
will have 28 days in which to re-
cuperate before resuming their stu-
dies in the fall. The last convoca-
tion of the summer will be held
Thursday, Aug. 22. Registration for
the fall term is scheduled for.
Thursday, Sept. 19.
PURDUE-Purdue's annual Home-
coming football game, the gala
home gridiron event of the season,
has been scheduled this fall for
November 16, with the Iowa eleven
as the opposition, it has been an-

HER COLLEGES'
nounced by Col. N. A. Kellogg, di-
rector of athletics.I
INDIANA-"China is trying very
hard to standardize her languages,
because it is difficult to effect any
sort of an organization with the
people speaking various tongues,"
stated Tien Lai Huang, noted Chi-
nese lecturer in addressing the fac-
ulty here. Huang also claims that
education is the only thing that
can help solve the problem which
China faces today, and that the
government is educating many stu-
dents toward this end.

As far as we can make out
the unsung hero of the Ath-
letics'lineup is Bing Miller.
The husky fellow has turned in
a top notch brand of baseball
all year, hitting even better
than his: usual stride, and look-
ing miich improved as an out-
fielder.
TYPEWRITING
andI
MIMEOGRAPHING-
A specialty for
twenty years.
Prompt service.. Experienced op-
erators.. Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

S to

STORE WIDE REDUCTION

. ,
a
t f .
r
' ' Q.
y , , i
i
F. owl 1
,, , ,- a
4
1
' . .
c ft.~ ..,
+
t" i
(
z-
.1..
4 ry '
°l v.
i;
r' i
x
B

Coats
Suits
AND

i Ensembles
Our complete remaining selection of
Spring and Summer apparel-Lovely
merchandise with the true stamp of
Jacobson quality. In fact, it is an op-
portunity that comes at this time of the
year, and offers every discriminating
woman or miss a chance to save on sea-
sonable merchandise.
Now on Sale-Taken from our
Regular Stock
Two Special Groups
and$24

II

DRESS SPECIAL
Types for all occasions in pleasing colors and styles. Sizes
Sizes 14 to 44
$10.00 $15.00 $19.75

AND AUGUST WE CLOSE SATURDAYS 6 P. M.

DURING JULY

1

It I

. 1

i -- --- _ . ..., .., v

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan