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July 18, 1928 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1928-07-18

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PAGE TWO
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the
loerd in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.o; by mail, $1.7.
OfAices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1928

FD1TORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors........George 1. Simons
Martin IMol
City Editor..............Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor.............Eleanor Scribner
:iasic and Drana Editor.......Stratton Buck
Books Editors ............Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayer

r

Alex Bochnow
Rohert Docker
Howard Shout
Margaret Zahi
Isabel Charles

Night Editors
ski
rayG
Cla
Reporters

Mart
G~eorge
larence
Robert

tin Mot
Simnons
Edelson
O'Brien

worthy undertaking. It is not a stag-
gering sum that is asked. Fifty cents A TR L
or a dollar, the price of a movie, is allT
that a student is expected to give. The //
generosity of those enrolled in the TACETA
University this summer will make SPARE THAT
some boy happy by affording him a I STUDENT
much-needed outing. This help of the "Educators must learn to fish for
students in affording under-privileged student's rather than to dynamite them
boys two weeks of sunshine and .. teaching students is not a 'sau-
healthful investment. sage - making' process."
-President Clarence Cook Little
THE RIGHT TO CRITICIZE "The season for student fishing this
One of the most irritating questions year is from June to August, inclu-
which seems to be the outgrowth of sive. There will be a bian on stu-
freedom is, "What right have you to (ent fishing Rol s Board of Regents
criticize?" And the thing which makes
it so irritating is that the question j
reveals in most people who ask it, a
point of view which will not allow a ! THIRD REGULAR PROGRAM
satisfactory answer. It has become ~
so familiar that it has been almost Sweltering Summer School
forgotten that there -can be a satis-
factory answer. ti ed witi f*yW water furnshed by
The simple truth of the matter is the Am **is G epartment j
that anyone who perceives a fault has th rough specalls Vouructed
a right to criticize, and conversely, es. I°h gwillg th e ac
he who fails in his perception has no somewhere atong the edge of
right to heap criticism upon some President Attle "Msl '
person or some thing which does not
deserve it. The fact that there have
been mistakes made, is no reason to
cease criticizing for other critics may Teaching student's may not be "sau-
benefit by the mistakes of their fore- sage-makingh' but a lot of the teach-
runners. One is bound only to be as ers try to spread the bologna.
penetrating and sincere as possible.
As a matter of fact the person who is 'Rojs Air Nail service between
interested enough to risk the unpopu- here and Ypsilanti will start im-
laritycapt to be aroused by the mediately. It is especialy design-
-practice of criticism, is most often ed for these high flilers.
one who is keen enough in his per-
ception to assume a enable position. AN OPEN LETTER TO
The absurdity of asking what right WALTEU P. CHRYSLER
a person has to criticize becomes ap- Sir:
parent when it is observed that the If that automobile that I ordered
question is always inspired by ad- from that bum factory of yours in
qersertinismalaysdnsprer bya d-ae Detroit is not here within a week,
verse criticism and never by favorable there will be a new car on the mar-
comment. Most significant of all, per- ket, called the Chrysler .22, named
haps, is the fact that the question Is after the bullet that caused your de-
never asked when a satisfactory an- ise. Or I might send a bomb through
swer to the criticism, is apparent. +hs. Imiht snd a bomb th.rog

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Avertising.................Lawrence Walkley
Advertising .................. Jeannette Dale
Accounts...................Whitney Manning
CirodLation....... .....Bessie V. Egelan
Assistants
Samueiil Lukens Lillian Korvinsky

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Janet Logie

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1928
Night Editor-CLARENCE EDELSON

Summer Tag Day will be held
on the campus today. This will
afford Summer students the op-
portunity to contribute to a
worthy cause. A 100 per cent
membership in the Camp club will
enable the directors of the camp
to accept the full list of applica-
tions from the underprivileged
boys of Detroit, Flint, Ann Arbor
and vicinity.
Fifteen campers, chosen on the basi
of high qualities of leadership, will
be stationed at various points on the
campus today to appeal to the stu-
dent body and faculty to lend support
to the University Fresh Air camp at
Patterson lake. These boys are op.
tomistic as they face the day's cam-
paign, and feel certain that the Sum-
mer students will readily contribute
to their worthy cause.
Their task today is that of raising
$500, which is the Summer school
quota of the camp. A fixed price 01
50 cents and $1 has again been set as
the price of a tag which signifies mem.
bership in the "Dollar" or "Half Dol.
lar" campus club. One dollar, how
ever, is the approximate cost of keep.
ing one boy at camp for one day.
It is reasonable to believe that every
individual inderstanding the signi-
ficance of the work that is being car.
ried on at the University Fresh A
camp will contribute a dollar or a hal
dollar without hesitation when the
are approached to buy a tag today
This camp project has attracted the
attention of and has drawn favorabli
comment from faculty of universities
and colleges throughout the country
It is looked upon as one of the mos
beneficial undertakings in thetrealr
of sociology conducted by a studen
organization.
True compensation for support ren-
dered the camp in these yearly Tag
Day campaigns is vividly felt when a
person makes a personal visit to the
camp site at the lake. The sight o
the hundred boys, which is the en-
rollment of each of the four sections
taking full advantages of the splendid
camp equipment, breathing pure air
eating wholesome food, getting a
swim twice daily, being exposed to the
great out-of-doors in play and in nature
study, having ideal sleeping quarters
with an abundance of fresh air, is one
that is sufficient to immediately sell
the observer on the camp idea.
The splendid support rendered the
camp by loyal alumni, members of
the faculty and students in the Uni -
versity has made the building up and
the maintenance of the camp possible
The work has progressed from year
to year resulting in the recruiting of
new supporters in addition to those
who are already helping. The suc-
cessful raising of a budget of approxi-
mately $8,000 is in itself a testimony
to the wide and deep-seated interest
that is shown in the activities of the
camp.
With the greater share of the budget
raised among alumni and friends, and
with $2,000 contributed by the student
body of the regular session, the Sum-
mer Session quota has been set at
$500 with the hope that no difficulty
will be experienced in raising that
nominal amount.
Each student will be asked to con-
tribute today to the support of this

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WHAT COST CONQUEST?
It is now more than a month since
the ill-fate crew of the Nobile dirig-
ible Italia descended on the icy wastes
of the Arctic, and enlisted the sym-
pathy and aid of a large part of the
civilized world. At the end of this
month and more, through the devasta-
tion wrought by the Arctic blizzards
in the meantime, some half dozen sur-
vivors of the crew have been rescued,
and more than a dozen men have been
lost in fruitless search for them.
Thousands of dollars in money have
been spent in attempting to reach the
marooned party, two airplanes lie
wrecked on Arctic shores, and still
there are several parties lost in the
vast wastes, without food or equip-
ment.
All of this tremendous expenditure
of men and money, of talent and
genius, has been brought about for no
material or scientific gain. The
Italia when it was lost was on no er-
rand of importance-not even on an
errand of geographical significance-
and had the commanders of that
dirigible awaited further motivation
than the spotlight of world affairs,
their ship would never have taken the
air, and the lives of the brave men
who perished in attempting to reach
them would have been saved.
It is this kind of thing, more than
anything else, which will finally turn
the public favor away from expedi-
tions into the frozen Arctic wastes,
The public will find it difficult to draw
the line, for instance, between a fool-
hardy attempt such as that under-
taken by Nobile and a flight under-
taken in the truest interests of science
and exploration-such as the present
contemplated one of Byrd to the South
Pole. Man, if he is ever to advance
consistently, must constantly keep
alive his thirst for knowledge of
realms unknown, and knowledge of
the Antarctic, as will be gained by
Byrd and his party, is one manifesta-
tion of this progress. Such an at-
tempt is worthy, perhaps, the peril of
human life which it incurs, and the
dangers which attend it; and it is
moved by none of the selfish effort at
self-exaltation which propelled the
tragic Italia expedition.
If we are to have conquest of space,
of frozen wastes, of nature, let it come
with as little sacrifice of life as pos-
sible. May humanity ever condemn
foolhardy and reckless endeavors to
these ends, and may it ever lend its
unstinted support to sound, sincere
efforts to aid to man's increasing store
of knowledge.
France and Italy have decided to
sign the treaty denouncing war. 1'
might be a good idea to have this on
engraved of brass so there will be no
mistaking it for a "scrap of paper"
as some treaties have been considered.
About the only logical use for the
straw votes which are so popular
right now, is to see which way the
wind is blowing.

the manl. I bet tnat would rowl you.
You are warned, so act accordingly.
Received By Air Mail Today
Oscar, Rolls' wonder-horse, na-
tionally famous educator and ad-
vocator of birth control, stated in
a speech before the Daughters of
the American Revolution that Re-
gents should not fish for Presi-
dents because they are likely to
catch carp. He also declared that
Regents should not dynamite
Presidents because they might
waste the charge.
* * *
The S. C. A. 'starts their annual
"Give the Kiddies a Bath" drive today.
The deluge takes place at the S. C.
A. hot-air clamp.
s* s
In England two people fell
through a skylight, from which
vantage point they had been
watching a ball. It is expected
that this is one method of crash-
Ing Uniom dances that will not be
popular next fall.
"On Bended Knee We Beg Thee"
You want to know why I haven't
contributed lately? Well, I'm not mad,
you understand, but I've been spend-
ing 'all my spare time since my last
date of publication trying to express
my opinion of your colyum in the
kinds of words that can be spelled any
way your typesetter (Editor's note:.
type-setter is compounded, Sue.) wish-
es to assemble them without com-
pletely i.nig their original meaning.
And now I've given it up as a bad
job and herewith accept your mag-
nanimou" kpology.
Sue Burb
"And Welcome Thee ..."
Little To Talk At Men's Club-
headline in Sunday's Daily.
Of course, if that had been the
Women's Club it would have been
different.

G
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BUY YOUR TAG
TODAY

---grff.;gyeffff .;ai~y;~lyCOIC0COC W MMa.00li//a 74 IrIi
BOOK BARGAINS]
ADDIT[ONS DAILY
TOGOUR.
Look Them Over-See What 50c Will Buy
VNIVERSITY
B ftBOOKSTORE

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ROOMS FOR RENT
Read The Classifeds

itional

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to4U

THE

DEN

has become a traditional factor

of campus life

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We express gratitude to the

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THIS SPACE RESERVED FOR
KERNEL'S CONTRIBUTION

1

Now that Sue has contributed
again, all that remains for us to
do is to find out who she is. Sue
has always retained her identity
as a mystery, just like some of
her contributions. But we are of-
fering a reward of any three of
President Little's best "fish" poles
to the person who will supply us
with positive information leading
to the discovery of the identity of
Sue.
* s *

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Customers
who have favored us with their
patronage since our opening

About the only nationally prominent'
figures who have ,not been engaged
by the Rocquefort Players to appear
in some role or other in their attempt
at "The Vikings" are Lindbergh and
One-eyed Connelley.
* * s
It's hot today for you, but think of
how you can help the poor little kids
at the fresh air camp.

1108

S. UNIVERSITY

PHONE 5701

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