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July 15, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-07-15

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WEAT HER
Fair and warmer.

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX, No. 19.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 15, 1928

PRICE FIVE CENTS

----- ._

SPEAKERS TO DISCUSSAM
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PROBLEM ON MONDAYF

ERICDA'S ATHLETES ENROUTE 1 SPECIALISTS ADDRESS
FOR S'TRUGGLE AT AMSTERDAM
MID SUMMER MEETING
}} tif e'} .. r '% .
~ N~;7JOF HEALTH OFFICIALS1

I

ITALIAN FLIER
TO PILOT ROMA

PROFESSOR CURTIS

TO OPEN

FIRST OF SERIES WITH
SCIENCE TALK
WILL MEET FOUR TIMES
Stephenson, Byrn, And Diamond Offer
Practical Lectures In Problems
Of School Supervisors
The Junior High School with be
the subject for the conference
courses offered by the School of Edu-
cation to superintendents, supervis-
ors, principals and teachers for the
coming week. Four phases o junior
high school work will be taken up by
men who are specialists in this field.
All lectures will be in the auditorium
of the University high school and
will start at 4:00 p. n.m
The first meeting, Monday after-
noon, will be addressed by Prof.
Francis D. Curtis, who will have for
his subject, "New Tendencies in Sci-
ence Teaching." Prof. Curtis will
show how the modern trend in sci-
ence teaching has developed and the
objectives that science teachers hope
to attain by the new methods. Those
in charge of the lectures believe that
science is rapidly becoming a more
vital factor in public education and
the treatment given to this subject
by Prof. Curtis will prove of prac-
tical value not only to those teach-
ing thesubject but also to super-
visors and those responsible for
placing it in the curriculum.
Stephenson Next
On Tuesday Prof. Orlando Stephen-
son will discuss, "How to Judge
the Quality of Teaching the Social
Studies." Prof. Stephenson will give
criteria whereby the quality of
the teaching of the social studies
may be judged. He will point out
how the supervisor may judge not
only the teaching in evidence but also
by the results seen in the pupils, and
also the means of knowing if the pro-
gram of the social studies is satis-
fying the need of the school.
"The Place of the General Shop"
will be discussed on Wednesday by
Prof. Marshall Byrn, who will show
the history of and the reason for the
placing of manual arts in the cur-
riculum of the modern school, as well
as indicate why the subject is of
iinportance to the boy of junior high
school age. He will also speak of the
organizationand equipment necessary
for the introduction of a shop in the
high school and the expense entailed
with such a program.
Close On Thursday
The methods ,of instruction in this
department which is somewhat dif-
ferent from those of other depart-
ments in the academic high school
will also be pointed out by Prof-
Byrn.
The neetings for the week will
close with the conference on Thurs-
day afternoon when Prof. Thomas
Diamond will speak on "Vocational
Guidance in the Junior High School."
'ducators have been studying and
learning about this subject to a con-
siderable extent in recent years but
as applied largely to the senior high
school. Prof. Diamond will point
out that this same type of program
should extend down into the junior
high school and become an Lntergral
part of that organization.
EMPLOY CLAVILUX
IN "THE VIKINGS"
Thomas Wilfred, the inventor of
the Clavilux, will arrive in Ann Ar-

bor Monday to direct rehearsals for
the production of "The Vikings." He
wilt bring with him the color organ
with which he will paint the sets
for the production in living light.
Although he is familiar with the
stage, being recognized as one of the
leading authorities of the world on
stage lighting, he has never before
combined the Clavilux with a stage
production.

S. S. President Roosevelt

Which sailed from New York last cmpeting in the games the American
Warinmdnv hd fnr the Olvmpic c intinzent will make stheir uarters

e Vnesaay, uDO Una r "JO Me-'y*IU
games at Amsterdam, Holland, withl
the entire American Olympic teaml
aboard. A track and swimming tankI
have been provided on its capaciousl
decks for the limbering up of the
athletes during the long trip. While

C, L ,lRg U WilX IftA,*US.
aboard the vessel, which will lie . in
the harbor at Amsterdam. Im addi-
tion to the contestants the boat car-
ries a large corps of trainers, of-
ficials, and newspaper men. Meals will
be served to the men on the ship.

MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION HEARS
SIX SPEAKERS IN SECOND
DAY'S PROGRAM
DR. SUNDWALL IN CHARGE
iiss Mabel Bragg, Dr. Nathan Sinai,
Dr. Emerson And Dr. Lumsden
Also Speak Here
Six public health specialists s"o:.:
yesterday in the west medical build-
iig In the second day's program on
the fourth week-end Public Health
Institute, which was combined with
the mid-summer meeting of the >
Michigan Public Health association.
The day began at 9 o'clock with in-
troductory remarks by Dr. John Sund-1 Cesare Sabelhl
wall, professor of hygiene and pub- Who will pilot the plane Ronje on
lic health here and president of the its attempted trans-ocean flight from
Michigan Public Health association, New York to Rome. Sabelhi has been
who was in charge of the program preparing for months for the ven-
He was followed by Miss Mabel ture. He will be accompanied on the
Bragg, assistant superintendent of trip by two companions. The. party
schools at Newton, Massachusetts, will take off from Curtis field.
whose topic was "Methods and Ma-
terials in Health Teaching." Miss
Bragg outlined the work of the teach-
er of hygiene and health in the pub- UUITAIY
lic school, and exhibited illustrative
material of the type she had found
ur her use. WEDNESDAY
County Phase Discussed
At 10 o'clock Dr. L. L. Lumsden, Student Christian Association . Spon-
Senior Surgeon of the United States sors Move To Aid Fresh Air
Public Health service, spoke on Camp At Patterson Lake
"County Health Units in the United'
States,"Hdescribing the work of the WILL TRY TO RAISE $500
Public Health service in organizing1
local health bureaus the country Summer Tag Day for the purpose
over.. The last speaker of the morn- of raising money for the maintenance
ing was Dr. Herbert Emerson, direc- of the University Fresh Air Camp at
for of the Pasteur Institute here, who Patterson lake will take .place on the
traced the history ;of rabies as dis- campus .Wednesday, July 18, accord-
ease and outlined its symptoms and ing to Martin Mol, '30, president of
treatment. the Student Christian Association,
Dr. Nathan Sinai, of the depart- A goal of $500 has been set as
ment of public health here, who has the Summer School quota, thus sup-
been for the past year a member of a plementing the $2,000 which was

THEATERS ANNOUNCE AIR MAIL SCHEDULE
PICTURES FOR WEEK PREPARED FOR CITY

"The Cohens and the Kellys in Paris"
Is Michigan Feature; Billie
Dove At Majestic
CHARLIE RAY COMING SOON
With "The Cohens and the Kellys
in Paris" scheduled to begin a four
day run this afternoon, and Sue Car-
ol's latest hit, "Walking Back," book-F
ed for Thursday, the Michigan offers7
two stellar attractions this week. In
addition, "Stop, Look, and Listen,".
with Loretta Gray, Archie Rock and
the six Kurnicker girls, is reputed to
be a peppy stage attraction.:
'?he Cohens and the Kellys in
Paris" is said to possess one of the
best all round casts assembled in
some time as far as the film world is;
concerned, while "Walkipg Back," a
story of the jazz mad age from a
new' angle, has already made a name,
for itself wherever shown. Billy
Wells and the Four Fays is the stage]
presentation for Thursday at the
Michigan.
The motion picture version of Eli-
nor Glyn's famous novel, "The Man1
and the Moment," opens with this aft-!
ernoon's matinee at the Wuerth, with
Sally O'Neill, Lowell Shermang Alice;
White and Larry Kent taking the ma-:
jor roles. "Mad Hour" is said to be
a vivid version of the famous Glyn.
love story. It will continue through;
Wednesday.
The irresistible Billie Dove in "The
Heart of a Follies Girl" opened Sat-
urday at the Majestic and will con-
tinue through until the middle of the
week. Larry Kent also supports MissE
Dove in the story from the pen of.
Adela Rogers St. Johns.
The Orpheum attraction for Sunday,
Monday, and Tuesday is "The Canyon
of Adventure" with Ken Maynard.
"The Air Patrol" opens this after-
noon at the Rae.
The Majestic announces the com-
ing of Charles Rae's new picture,
"The Count of Ten," while the Mich-1
igan is booked soon for another Jan-I
nings picture, "The Street of Sin."
Jannings is said to have written and
directed his new, picture himself.
LITTLE TO TALK
AT MEN'S CLUB
President Clarence Cook Little will
deliver an address before an open
meeting of the Men's Educational1
club at 7 o'clock Monday night at the
Michigan Union. Although the parti-
cular subject of his address has not
been announced, it is believed that
President Little will discuss some
phase of modern educational trends.
President Little has just returned
from a motor trip through the upper
peninsula that has continued through-
Little will remain in this city for the
out the past two weeks. President
rest of the summer.

Postmaster Pack Arranges For First
Flight Stamp In Connection
With New Service
SPECIAL STAMP ISSUED
The schedule covering the operation
of the new airmgail service Tuesday
at Ann Arbor Municipal Airport has
been prepared . by- Postmaster A. C.
Pack, and was announced today. The
pouches for eastbound mail will be
locked at 10:30 a. m. The eastbound
plane leaves the port at 11:15 a. m.
Westbound pouches are to be closed
at 4:05 p. i., for the mail plane which
leaves Ann Arbor at 4:50.
The present rate on air mail post-
age is 10 cents for the first half ounce
and 10 cents for each additional half

MEXICAN ACE'S BODY
GOES TO COUNTRYMEN
WITH SPECIAL TRAIN
Mexico Desirous That Body Go Into
Northern Portion Where Hero
Was Best Beloved
DECLINE OFFER OF PLANE
(By The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, July 14-The body
of Captain Emilio Carranza, the Mex-
ican aviator, will be taken to Mexi-
co City from New York by train and
not aboard the Battleship Florida
which had been placed at the disposal
of the Mexican government by Prei-
dent Coolidge.
The use of a train seemed a more
practical method of returning the
body, and it was also believed that
the Mexican government's decision
was based on the fact that Carran-
zta's home was in Northern Mexi-
co.
Was Popular In North
The aviator enjoyed great populari-
ty in that section, and it is expected
that the traini journey will afford an
opportunity for the natives of the
region to pay a tribute to him. It is
::robable that the train will stop at
various places along the road to Mex-
ico City to permit public demonstra-
tion.
The Mexican Embassy officials here
expect the train to leave New York
'immediately after the funeral cere-
monies, with the plan of holding the
burial in Mexico City by the week
end.
Appr'ecates ymthy .
The State Department was notified
tonight by Ambassador Oles, of
Mexico, that he had received a mes-
sage from his government expressing
appreciation of the. offer of the bat-
tieship to transport the air hero's
body to Mexico, but declined the pro-
posal.
The messaige declared that the Mex-
:can government was desirous of ha-
ing the body transported by rail on
a. special train to Laredo, Texas,
where it will be met by a Mexican
Military Mission which will escort it
,to Mexico City.
Full- military honors will mark the
funeral of the flyer to be held in New
York city next Wednesday under plans
made public by the war department.
The ceremony will be under the di-
rection of Major-General Hanson Ely,
Commanding General of the second
corps area.
RENEW HUNT FOR
LOST AMUNDSEN
MOSCOW, July 14- The Russian
Ice-breaker Maligin has been ordered
to search thoroughly off the southeast
coast of Spitzbergen for Roald
Amundsen and his five companions,
missing since they hopped off in a
plane to the aid of the Italian sur-
vivors.
The Maligin had been ordered to re-
turn to Archangel, but when hope was
revived that the Amundsen party still
may be alive, the orders were coun-
termanded.
A message from the ice-breaker
Krassin said that the aviators held
C.huhnovsky who was forced to de-
scend near Cape Platen after sight-
ing Captainls Mariano and Zappi, Ital-
ian survivors, had reported today that
he and his three companions were
well.

national committee of 42 members
whose purpose is to investigate the
cost of medical care, was the next
speaker.
Maladjustments

ounce thereafter, or fraction thereof. "Evidences of maladjustment in
However, a new rate will go into the medical world," he said, "include
effect on August 1. The initial rate the large number of war rejections,
will be reduced to 5 cents for the first the depressing results of physical ex-
half ounce. Ten cents will be re- aminations of school-children, the,
quired as before for each additional 100,000 drug addicts and the 60,000
half ounce or fraction thereof. first admissions to homes for the
Postmaster Pack emilhasized the rsadiiost hme frteI
PI tatrPc epaie h mentally sick per year, and finally
need for local stamp collectors and menallsfck pe ear, an f hly
~ ~dissatisfaction of the doctor on thel
"first flight cover collectors" to get one hand and the public on the other."
their air mail covers in the postoffice I The number of doctors is less by 800
as early as possible before the open- ' than in 1918, declared Dr. Sinai, and
ing date next Tuesday. Such pre- if medical service is to keep pace
caution, he said would insure getting with population growth Its economics
the special care with which such coy- will have to be reorganized.
E are being stamped with the special I
flight cancellation stamp" Dr. Walter M. Simpson, the last
o r to obtai clea pressons Th speaker, gave a resume of the his-
special stanp will be used next Tues- tory and diagnosis of tularemia,
day only ~ which he characterized as "the first
The air mail envelopes can be ob- wholly American disease." It is con-
tained either at the pcstoffice or at Itracted by contact with the flesh of
Chamber of Commerce headquarters. a wild rabbit, and is transmitted by
the deer-fly and the common wood-
tic, lie asserted.
ANNOUNCE TOTALI After anr adjournment for lunch at
OF REGISTRATION the Union, the afternoon session open-
ed with the fourth of :a series of lec-
Total reistratio ftures given by Prof. William C. Hoad,
Summer Sessiorn allgues for the of the University on "Public Health,
Summe s son,48in allcolleges and Engineering." He dealt with garbagel
schools show 3,482 in attendance, acollection and disposal.
deceas o is tio haanimnaddspal

raised during the Fresh Air camp
campaign of the regular school ses-
sion. The remainder of the $8,000
camp budget is raised by subscrip-
tion from alumni and friends of the
University.
The Fresh Air camp makes pos-
sible a summer outing for 400 under-
privileged boys of Detroit, Ann Arbor,
Fiint, Hamtramck and other sur-
rounding cities. It is the only camp
of its nature conducted by a Big Ten
university student organization.
George Rich, 30L, captain of the.
Varsity football team is general camp
superintendent this summer. Ile is
assisted by a staff of fifteen Univei-
sity students, many of whom are
prominent in athletics at Michigan.
President Little says: "Of all the
enterprises conducted by the students
of the University of Michigan, the
Fresh Air Camp which for years past
has been managed and Unanced
through the efforts of the Student
Christian Association is one of the
most highly to be commended. To
take hundreds of under-privileged
and under-nourished boys off the
streets of Detroit and other large
cities of the state and give them a
brief outing in association with
chosen, leaders from the vIichigan
student body, is a splendid program
which commands, I am sure sym-
pathy in every directions'

u-vac- oviom Le enrollment
of last summer.I
The Graduate School showed the,
largest gain with 163 more students
enrolled, but this was more than off-
set by a loss of 244 in the College
Literature, Science, and the Arts. The
Medical School also showed a gain of
33.
The College of Pharmacy, the Law,
School, and the School of Business
Administration were the schools
showing the least variation over last
year's enrollment. There was a loss
of 99 in the School of Education, and
32 in the Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture.
Due to the fact that the session
is nearly one-half completed, it is be-
lieved that no change will be made i
in the figures compiled above, for thel
dead line for late registrations has
long been passed, according to a'
statement issued from Dean Kraus of
the Summer Session.,

i

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1
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j
7

DESPITE WOMEN'S AVERSION TO
HARDSHIP, SOME ARE ENGINEERS
It is probable that the vast ma- Recent years have added consider-
ably to the wide field of engineering.
jority of women have an aversion to We have aeronautical engineers, radio
high hip-boots, mud, corduroy, and engineers, illuminating engineers, asl
other symbols of the proverbial en- well as innumerable specialists l.0
gineer. It is probable, and it is nat- other newly-added branches. Civil,
ural. However, there have been wow- mining, electrical, and mechanical en-
men Hngineertrgineering no longer command the en-
men engineers, tire scope of work.
At present we have record of one Necessarily, this means more oppor-
woman, who successfully passed four tunities for women. Last year a wo-
years work in our own engineering man returned to the university to
college. What has become of her - complete a mechanical course that she
whether she is tramping among the, had at one time-.practically given up.
mountains, building bridges, or shak- And if you step into the aeronautical
ing a gold pan at the edge of some designing room you may be fortunate
mountain stream- is not definitely enough to get a glimpse of "Demmie
known. (Perhaps she has renounced Tasse," the accurate, and exceedingly
all anid has gone back to high-heeled neat drawing of an airplane done by
punips and evening gowns. 'a woman enthusiast.

I
I
3

BASEBALL RESULTS
(By The Associated Press)
American League
St. Louis 4, Washington 2.
Chicago 11-11, Boston 4-2.
Other games postponed on account
of rain.
Nationa L"ague
Brooklyn 5, St. Louis 2.
New York 4, Cincinnati 2.
Pittsburgh 10, Washington 0.
Chicago 10-3, Philadelphia 3-2.
PREDICTS RECORD JUMP
Coach Steve Farrell of the Univer-
sity of Michigan track team, prophe-
sized recently that De Hart Hubbard,
his former pupil here, would broad
jump 26 feet by the end of the 1929
track seasons providing he is not in-
jured.

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