100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 29, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f

T 4 P

'uummrr

WEATHER
Generally fair, and
warmer.

I a t

:1Ii3

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

i

VOL. IX, No. 6. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1928 PRICE FIVE GENT

PROU HUSSEY TAL[S!
ON GEOLOGIC HISTORY
OF NIAGARA DISTRICTi

IS LEADING MAN
SWITH PLAY GROUP

SALl -SLOWLY MOVING BACK
AS BASE CRUMBLES,
liE DEtLARES 2
LECTURE PRECEDES TRIP
Predicts Disappearance Of American .
Side Of Fails Within A Few
hundred Years , ' "
"There willi be no American falls at
Niagara within a few hundred years
under present condition's," declared
.Professor R. C. Hussey in an illus- .
trated lecture yesterday afternoon at
five o'clock at the Natural Science
auditorium. "If, as engineers have Roman Bohnen
Leading man with the Rockford
proposed, an even distribution of the Players, who will appear this .after-
water going over the Canadian falls noon in th final performance of "The
is made possible, the existence of the Letter" and who opens in "So This Is
American falls might be prolonged," I London" tomorrow.
he added. .
Tlhis lecture was given as a prelimi-iID flDAM AIIuOIiE

nary to the annual trip to Niagara
Falls which will take place next week-
end. The trip is to be made under
the guidance of Professor Hussey.
Many views of Niagara Falls and its
vicinity were shown in conjunction
with the lecture. A complete outline
of the geologic history that led up to
the formation of the falls was given.
Glaciers Formed Lakes
"Millions of years ago, when the
sea covered all the locality of Niagara
Falls, the materials were laid down
which make up the cliff over which
the falls now plunge," stated the lec-
turer. "Then came the glaciers
scooping out the earth to make great
hollows which the Great Lakes now
occupy, and from these lakes the water
that n'hakes the Falls. At one time the
outlet for the upper lakes was along
the Ottawa river past the present city
of Ottawa in Canada," said Professor
Hussey, "but later an upheaval in the
North caused a return to the old out-
let."
"The Falls are slowly retreating,"
he declared, "the Horseshoe Falls on
Jhe Canadian side at the rate of six
feet per year, and the American Falls
at about one foot per year. The great
diffierence in the rate is due to the
fact that only about six per cent of
the total volume flows over the Ameri-
can side, the other ninety-four per
cent going over the Horseshoe Falls.
The Falls in this country are about
ten feet higher than those in Can-
ada."
Interesting Trip Is Planned
"Many thrills are in store for those
taking the trip," Said Prof. Hussey.
"There will be a trolley trip along the
river gorge, the tracks running very
close to the edge of the stream. There
is the trip in the little steamer, 'Maid
of the Mist,' which noses its way close
up under the great cataract until it
seems to capsize, when it whirls about
andreturns safely. There is also a
trip over the giant whirlpool in a lit-
tle car suspended from a cable."
MANY STUDENTSE
ENROLL A T CAMP
According to a report received yes-
terday from Prof. George R. La Rue,
director of the University Biological
station on Douglas lake in the north-
ern part of the southern peninsula of
Michigan, there are 72 students en-,.
rolled for the course offered there
during the summer. Of these 49 are
graduate students, 22 are from the
College of Literature, Science, an'd the
Arts, and one is a student in the '
School of Education.
According to records, the number
enrolled at present is approximately
the same as last year, and Prof. La-'
Rue expects several more to enroll
before the end of the week. The sta-
tion opened last Monday.
SHAW TO GIVE ADDRESS
Wilfred B. Shaw, general secretary
of the Alumni association, left Thurs-
day evening for Louisville, Kentucky,
where he will deliver an address be-
fore the annual meeting of the Uni-
versity Louisville Alumni association.
Mr. Shaw was last year president of
the American Alumni Council.

,; ruunm Knnunb
FOR COMING EVENTS
Educational Conferences, Excursion
To Niagara Falls, And Rockford
Plays Are High Lights
PARROTT TO GIVE TALK
Events listed on the program out-
lined' for the week beginning July 2
and ending on July 7 were announced
from the office of Edward H. Kraus,
dea.n of the Summer Session, yester-
day. 'Ilhere are thirteen items listed
which are of a diversified nature and'
which have been, prepared especially
for those in attendance at, the Sum-
mer Session.
The prlgram follows:
r Monday, July 2
4:00 P. M.-Educational Conference
-The Purpose of the Pre-Primary
School-Dr. Katherine B. Greene.
Auditorium of the University High
School.
5:00 P. M.-Lecture-Elizabethan
Drama-rofessor Thomas M. Parrott,
of Princeton University.
8:15 P. M.-George M. Cohan's "So'
This is London," by the Rockford'
Players. Sarah Caswell Angell Hall.1
Admission will be charged.
Tuesday, July 3
3:00 P. iM.-Educational Conference
-Present Tenden'cies in Pre-Primary
Education-Dr. Katherine B. Greene.
Auditorium of the University High
School.
5:00 P. M.-Lecture-Renaissance
ItaliaO Painting (Illustrated),-Miss
Adelaide A. Adams.
8:15 P. M.-George M. Cohan's "So
This is London!" by the Rock'ford
Pltayers. Sarah Caswell Angell Hall.
Admission will be charged.
Wednesday, July 4|
8:15 P. M.-George Cohan's "So This
is London!" by the Rockford Players.
Sarah Caswell Angell Hall. Admis-£
vion will be charged.
Thursday, July 5
4:00 P. M.-Educational Conference
-Tendencies in School Organization-
Professor Arthur B. Moehlman. Au-
ditorium of the University High
School.
5:00 P. M.-Lecture-Heating the
Home (Illustrated), Professor Ran-'
som S. Hawley.
8:15 P. M.-Anatole France's "The
Man Who Married a Dumb Wife," by
the Rockford Players. Sarah Caswell
Angell Hall. Admission will be
charged.
Friday, July 6
2:00 P. M.-Excursion No. 3-i
Niagara Falls and Vicinity-under the'
direction of Assistant Professor Rus-
sell C. Hussey, via Michigan Central
Railroad to Detroit and steamer toI
Buffalo. Return early July 9.
8:15 P. M.-Anatole France's "The
Man Who Married a Dumb Wife,'* by
the Rockford Players. Sarah Caswell
Angell Hall. Admission will be'
charged.
Saturday, July 7
8:15 P. M.-Anatole France's "The
Man Who Married a Dumb Wife," by
the Rockford Players. Sarah Caswell
Angell Hall. Admission will be
charged.

SCHOOL of EDUCATION
To GIVE NEW COURSE
Special Course Concerning Present
Day Teaching Problems Offered
To All Interested
STUDY TO BE INFORMAL
School superintendents, supervisors,
p:.rincipals, and teachers are being of-
fered an informal conference' course
upon certain phases of present-day
problems by the School of Education
during the Summer Session, The
conferences which will take the na-
ture of round table discussions are
under the direction of Prof. Arthur
B. Moehlman, and are open not only
to regularly enrolled students in the
Summer Session, but also to those
school authorities who can afford to
spend only a part of their time on the
campus.
The conference course carriek no
regular credit, but each phase of the
topic will be presented by experts in
the field involved and the talks will
be supplemented by group discussion.
During the second week of summer
school the program will deal with the
primary school. On Monday, July 2,
Mrs. Katharine B. Greene will take the
topic "The Purpose of the Primary
School" and on Tuesday,. July third,
she will present a discussion of the
"Present Tendencies in Pre-primary
Education.". "Tendencies in School1
Organization" will be discussed by
Prof. Arthur B. Moehman, on Thurs-
day, July 5. All meetings will be held
in the University High School audi-
torium and will begin at 4:05 o'clock.
The conferences will be continued dur-
ing a period of seven weeks.
AIR, CARNIVAL DRAWS
HUGE CROWD TO PORT
i'relninary Spectacles Attract Many
To Air Olympics Held At
Ford Air-port
BOYS' CONTEST OPENS
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, June 28.-Attracted by
one of the most ambitious aerial car-
nivals ever undertaken, birdmen from
the four corners of the nation fHoked
here today for the Detroit Air Olym-
pic at Ford Airport.
Although the featured events, the
National Air tour and the Gordon
Bennett International Balloon race do
not start until Saturday, thousands of
the air-minded were on hand today
for the elaborate program of prelimi-
nary tests and exhibition flying.
The difficult load tests for the 26
planes entered in the tour were carded
for today, and preparations were
made to handle a crowd of 100,000
spectators. The trials include speed
tests over a closed course, landings
and take-offs with the full load ,pre-
scribed by federal regulations propor-
tionate to the motive power of the
ship.
Sandwiched in between the tests.
planes from the army airbase at Sel-
fridge Field were to give exhibitions
of formation flying and battle maneu-
vers.

COMMENCE WORK
ONOLD MUSEUM
Work on remodeling the old museum
building next to Alumni Memorial hall
in order to make it suitable to house
the department of romance languages,
is proceeding satisfactorily, and the
building will be ready for occupancy
about the middle of August, according
to an announcement made yesterday.
Plans for the remodeling provide for
eighteen class rooms, a lecture hall,
a large assembly room for the use
of the French, Spanish, and Italian
dramatic societies, and offices for the
staff of the romance language depart-
ment. Partitions are of sound-proof
cinder block, and a new cement floor
Is to be built downstairs. The entire
building is being rewired, to provide
better lighting facilities.
The transfer of the romance lang-
uage headquarters will entail several
other changes. The lower floor of
South Wing, the former headquarters,
will be occupied by the Treasurer's
and Secretary's offices, while the Ger-
man and philosophy departments will
occupy the upper floors.
NEW PLAY IS OFFERED1,
IN ROCKFORD PROGRAM'
George Cohan's "So This Is London"
Is Second Bill Scheduled By
Rockford Group
IS GIVEN IN AFTERNOON
Switching rapidly from melodrama
to light comedy, the Rockford PlayersI
will present George M. Cohan's "So'
This Is London" as their second bill
of the summer, beginning with thec
matinee performance tomorrow aft-
ernoon at 3:30 o'clock. Katherine Wick
Kelly, whose work in "The Letter" has
axcited so much favorable comment
will appeari in the role of Lady Amy
Ducksworth, whle Roman Bhneln,
leading man of the company, will play
the part of Hiram Draper, senior. Hir-
am Draper, Jr., has been assigned toe
Robert Henderson.
"So This Is London" is a comedy
bringing into play the prejudices and
misconceptions concerning one an-
other held by many English and Amer-
ican peoples. Hiram Draper, Jr., falls -
in love with Eleanor, the beautiful
daughter of Sir Percy Beauchamp. I
Both families immediately oppose thel
union, and the opinions that each fam-
ily hold of the other, and of Amer-
cans of English in general, as the'
case may be, is shown in scenes de- I
scribing each household from the point
of view of the other.
Robert Henderson, director of the
players, promises that the play con-
tains many laughs, and that playgoers
will be giver opportunity to make' theY
acquaintance of members of the com--t
pany who were necessarily assigned
negligable roles in the production of1
"The Letter."f
"So This Is London" will be given
its second performance tomorrowj
night at 8:15.
NOTICE
There will be a meeting of all thoset
who are interested in a German read-I
ing course for post-graduate studentst
tonight, Friday, June 29, at 7 o'clock,
in room 201 University hall.

No Word ReceivedNN
From Nobile Partyi AS
(By Associated Press) EXPECTEDA MISSOURI
ROME, June 28--For twocdays no
word has come to the Citta Di Mi-
lano at Virgo from the remnants of
General Umberto Nobile's party on OPPOSING FORCES WAR WITH
the ice near Foyn Island. This was EACH OTHER OVER DRY
revealed in the official communico dif- PLANK IN PLATFORM
fused by the air ministers tonight. The
communico adds that the Citta Dl Mi- IOICE OF, NOMINEE NEAR
lano believed atmospheric conditions_-
had been the cause of this loss of Contest Resolves Itself To Show Of
communication. Strength With Few Still
The Nobile ship reported that the Holding Hope
weather has been bad with a strong
north wind and a blanket of fog ex.-1 (By Associated Press)
tending towards the northeast. The HOUSTON, June 28-Senator Reed,
Fsraganza, base ship for captain Riis' of Missouri, and the drys of the South
er-Larsen, is still blockaded by the dug in for the last ditch fight to-
ice near North Cape. I
No news has been received from the night.
three men who started to walk to land Neither organization held high hopes
from Nobile's men. The Russian ice of stopping,Al Smith but both went
breaker Krassien is expected to arrive ahead determinedly, the Reed forces
at Krarrs Bay tomorrow night. Iheartened by the demonstration on be-
helf of their candidate when he was
nominated today and the drys stimu-
Slated by a series of "pep" speeches
C NK O and a mass meeting early in the day.
It had resolved itself to a show of
strength but there were still a few
ORC FLIGHThopefuls among the antis believing
that Smith could be stopped. The drys
Hope For Success Of Second Attempt were centering their attention on the
British Aviator Has Made demand for a "bone dry" plank in the
This Season platform. Reed men went to work for
more votes and there were rumors
WIRES BASE AT AZORES that he had a show of strength in the
Mississippi delegation.

(By Associated Press)
LISBON, Portugal, June 28-Capt.
Frank T. Courtney, British aviator,
who made an unsuccessful attempt to
fly to the Azores Wednesday hoppedI
off at 8 a. m. today for Horta, about;
1,050 miles away. From there he in,
tends to fly to the United States by
way of Halifax.
HORTA, Island of Fayal, Azores,!
June 28-Capt. Frank T. Courtney,
British aviator, sent a wireless mes-
sage to the Associated Press this aft-
ernoon reading:
"Still going strong; expect arrive
about 4 o'clock."
Miss Earhart Departs
SOUTHAMPTON, England, June 28'
-Miss Amelia Earhart, Wilmer Stultz'
and Louis Gordon, fresh from the
cordial welcome given them in Great
Britain after their flight across the
Atlantic from Newfoundland, sailed
for home today.
The group of American flyers wasl
given a hearty greeting by the pas-
sengers lining the rails of the steaW-
ship President Roosevelt as their
tender came alongside.
Miss Earhart was guest of honor
at a private dinner given Wednesday
night by Mrs. Hubert Scott Payne of
the Imperial Airways and slippedI
away from her hotel quietly this mor-
ning to jbin the liner without any of-
ficial function.
DUTCH SCIENTIST
TO SPEAK TODAY1
An address on "The Evolution of
the Cerebral Cortex" will be given byI
Dr. C. U. Ariens Kappers, director of
the Institute for Neurological Re-'
search at Amsterdam, Holland, at 3
o'clock this afternoon in room 2501,
East Medical building. An invitation
to attend is extended to the public.
Dr. Kappers is one of the world'ss
outstanding investigators in the
field of neurology, and is in Ann Ar-
bor as the guest of Dr. Carl Huber, di-
rector of the anatomy laboratories
of the University.
WAR THIN IS GIVENy
fIONORARY DEGREE
Dr. Aldred S. Warthin, head of the
department of pathology, was signally
honored at the recent commencement
of the University of Indiana when the
honorary degree of doctor of laws was
conferred upon him in recognition of
his achievements as teacher, author,
editor, physician, and independent in-
vestigator. Dr. Warthin has been di-I
rector of the pathological laboratory'
here for 25 years.
French railway men are being given
instructions in English.

{
I
i

h.
°
1

Platform Is Complete
/(By; Associated Press)
SAM HOUSTON, HALL, Houst
June 28-The Democratic Natiot
Convention cleaned away the endl
volume of oratory which had faced
today and turned toward the adopt
of a platform and the nominationt
President.
The platform was completed Is

on,
nal
ess
it
ion
for
Otte-

today by the Resolution Committee
to be presented to the convention it-
self. Only the prohibition plank caus-
ed any worry and most of the dele-
gates believe a satisfactory solution
over the party declaration of that
point had been reached.
While the platform committee work-
ed an almost interminable parade of
speakers marched across the conven-
tion rostrum nominating and conven-
ing candidates until 6:51 p. m. To-
night a recess was taken until 8:30
so that the resolutions report could be
attacked by delegates who had been
allowed a period of rest.
Today procegdings were in three
sessions, a morning, an afternoon and
night gathering.
STUDENTS TO BE
GUESTS A T PAR T Y
Students of the Summer Session will
be guests at a general reception given
by the faculty at 8:30 tonight, in Bar-
bour gymnasium. Dean Edward H.
Kraus of the Summer Session and
Mrs. Kraus will head the receiving
line. There will be dancing until 12.
The Women's League will entertain
the summer students at a dance in the
Women's Field House on July 27. Be-
ginning Monday, July 2, tea will be
served in the field house from 3:30
to 5 by Marie Hartwig, '29, president
of the Women's League.
BASEBALL SCORES
American League
St. Louis 5, ,Detroit 2.
New York 10, Philadelphia 4.
Cleveland 2, Chicago 3.
Washington 4-7, Boston 3-8.
National League
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 4.
Philadelphia 1, New York 2.
No other games scheduled.

,
3i
_., ..f'
{ .
z
a :
s.
_.i;
'v. 3
k r
_r ,
i ".. t '.
{i ;:

ROCKFORD PLAYERS' LEADING MAN
HAD ACTIVE CAREER AT MINNESOTA

Appearing before university audi-
ences is nothing new to Roman Boh-
nen, leading man of the Rockford
players, who will play his second role
of the season as Hiram Draper, Sr.,
in "So This Is London" at Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall tomorrow afternoon.
During his undergraduate days at the
University of Minnesota he filled for
two years the position of varsity cheer
leader, or rooter king, as the job is
called in Minneapolis. He was active
in campus dramatics at the northern
university, and both before and after
receiving his diploma appeared on the
professional stage with a stock com-
pany in St. Paul. In referring to his
St. Paul experience in a recent in-
terview, Bohnen declared that a baw-
ling out he received for tardiness
from the director of this company had

since been late to a rehearsal.
After graduation, the actor was call-
ed back to the university to direct the
most gigantic enterprise in the athlet-
ic history of Minneapolis. He organ-.
ized and directed, during the fall of
the year 1923, the campaign to raise
$2,000,000 for the erection of the me-
morial stadium. His efforts resulted
in the securing of the funds and the
completion of the structure.
For a short time. after this, Bohnen
continued his professional work in
St. Paul, going from there to the
Goodman Memorial theater, Chicago.
He joined the Rockford troupe as
leading man this summer. The en-
thusiasm with which his performance
in "The Letter" was received has giv-
en local playgoers reason to believe
that a series of interesting roles are

'I
'

INoohrgmsshdld

-I

DAILY TRYOUTS
Students enrolled in the Sum-
mer Session and desirous of
oltaining practical journalistie
experience may report at "the
offices of The Summer Mlich1am
Daily in the Press building be-
tween 2 and 5 o'clock any after-
noon this w'eek. Practical exper-
fence is offered both in the busi-
ness and editorial departments

I

f
i
I
I

so great an effect that he has never lin store for them this season.

.:

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan