100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 28, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DATi Y

m -TTTn 0 *1 e

S{'li , A la £ -v T."AHURS-D
TII UMRM fICMVAT

AY, 3I

Wlit Bummer
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing theUniversity Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.

:i

The Associated Press is exclusively
titled to the use for republication of all n
dispatches credited to it or not otherv
credited in this paper and the local ri
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, p
office as second class matter. w
Subscription by carrier, $1.so by mail, $t
Offices : Press Building, Maynard Str
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors.........George E. Sim
Martin Mol
City Editor.......... ..Lawrence R. K
Foature Editor.... .....Eleanor Scrib
Music and Drama Editor... Stratton Bi
Books Editors...........Kenneth G. Pat
Kathryn Sayer
Telegraph Editor...........Daryl W. Ir
Night Editors

Alex Bochnowski
George B. Simons
Reporters
Margaret Arthur]
Bertram Askwith How
Raymond Bridges

Martinn

en-
ews
-wise
news
post-
1.75.
reet,
nons
Uein
bner
uck
rick
'win
Mol
rles
out
ner
ley
ing
and
len
key
'

-
s
e
s
:w
s
i
r
r
i
t
t ,
. ,
I

interested in the history of our gov-
ernment after hearing the keynote ad-
dress at the Houston convention de-
livered by Claude G. Bowers. Through-
out the address there were scathing
criticisms of Hamilton's imperialistic
tendencies linking him definitely with
the present principles of the Republi-
can party, and, on the other hand,
there were the highest praises bestow-
ed upon Jefferson and linking him with
the present Democratic party.
Taking Ono cudgels with the speaker
for his praise of Jefferson, for it is
needless to dwell at length on a theme
to prove phis greatness, it is regret-
table that a party keynoter would,
as an antithesis to his champion, uti-
lize the name of Hamilton in such an
uncomplimentary way.
Hamilton, like Jefferson, needs no
lengthy defense. His whole life story
reads like an inspiring romance al-
most unparalleled. His patriotism and
loyalty to the Union for which he'
sacrificed so willingly is unquestioned.
His untiring efforts in behalf of the
establishment of the Constitution'
coupled with his masterful work

Music And- Drama
"THE LETTER"
A review, by Jack Davis
Very nervous persons, and those not
susceptible to the more or less cath-
artic appeals of oriental sex-and-
thunder melodrama, might wisely
avoid 'seeing "The Letter," the Somer-
set Maugham piece which the Rock-
ford Players presented for the third
time at Sarah Caswell Angell hall last
night. There are some five gun- shots
as curtain raisers, and another which
comes near the end of the play. I
feel that it is well ifor the yet unjaded
summer playgoers to be prepared for
them.
True, there is but one murder in the
course of these three violent acts; but
it is unculestionably a thorough mur-
der, and one thoroughly exploited both
through exposition and through ret-
roactive action. And there is but one
motive-not a very fresh one, but, no
doubt, a very good one. There are
no fresh motives anyway. Effective

Insist on
the ORIGINAL
GwUM

= iillDllllllllilt111111111111111!l1111111tiitllli111#Ilitlltlililllt111ll[t111111111111111t1111III11
r
1
44
i31 IW3:.
C- -
i=
OPEN ALL SUMMER

t ... ..

G

-1f

1-

Isabel Cha
ward F. Shl
Jack Sumi

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising...............Lawrence Walk]
Accounts .................. Whitney Manni
Circulation......... . Bessie V. Egela
Assistants
'Samuel Lukens Hanna Wal
Jeanette Dale Lillian Korvinsk
THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 1928
Night Editor-STEWART HOOKE

M
O

1.

r

which placed the
government on a stabl

THE TAX SURVEY
President Little's proposal to Gov-1
ernor Green offering the resources of
the University of Michigan for the pur-
pose of carrying on a tax survey of
the state is a plan! deserving serious
consideration of the state executive
and other officials who have ex-
', pressed themselves as being desirous
of effecting a just and fair taxing sys-
tem in the state.
Although the details of the plan
have not been thorouighly studied and
worked out, the skeleton as suggested
by Dr.Little should not be looked upon
indifferently.
There has been a long felt want of
more helpful service to the state on
the part of the University. Charges
of 'no little consequence have been;
imade to the effect that the University!
is not as helpful to the state as its
ri8ources and potentialities permit. Al-
though there may be a difference of
opinion on this attitude, it i-s obvious
that here, at least, the University
president proposes a plan from which'
the state will derive much benefit.
The tax situation has now reached
a complex condition. The tax bur-
den has increased rapidly at the ex-1
pense of the citizenry of the state.,
The progress of certain communities
has been meniaced under the existing
conditions. Although there is no
guarantee that the proposed plan will
be a panacea for all of the minor and
major evils which now may be point-
ed to, it is a certainty that a thorough
study of the situation is urgently
needed.
tWith the unlimited equipment and
'staff of expert faculty men at the dis-
potal of the state in this undertaking,
progress to some degree at least is in-
evitable. In this matter the depart-
ments of forestry, geography, educa-
tion, political science, economics and
mathematical statistics could be of in-
estimable help, and it is noteworthy
that a University president is willing
to lend his support in an undertaking
in which the people of the state are
the primary beneficiaries.
It is unfortunate that in connection
with this project that a representa-
tive of the public press has conveyed
to the people of Michigain! through his
newspaper affiliations a distorted pic-
ture of Dr. Little's proposal and the
manner in which he presented it to
the governor. Tihe plan has been sar-
castically criticized as one intended
to swell the University budget. A
false account of Dr. Little's intended
interview with Governor Green in
which the press representative made a
capital of a breach of friendship be- t
tween the governor and the president
resulting from the last legislative s
session is an injustice to the well in-
tended motive of the University presi- a
dent. The best of harmony between
Gov. Green and Pres. Little has never g
been doubted, and The Daily's con-
w
fidence in Michigan's governor is such
as to feel certain that the state exe-
cutive will take a personal interest
in the merits of Pres. Little's plan.
m
THE KEYNOTER SPEAKS
Alexander Hamilton, the arch-enemy pr
of the common people, and the doer of
deeds ,at the expense of the populace. b
Thonas Jefferson, the lover of lib- F
erty and the peoples' champion. W
Such would be the conclusion ar- w

.
,,
e
0
a
P
9
S
h
G
d
u
9
u
i
e
n
o
n
I
d

is sufficient to endea
posterity, regardless4
ferences.
It is perhaps true
labored for a strong
ment, as opposed to
structed government o
such plan of action wa
at a time when a g
still clothed in its s'
situation today is a d
than which formed th
the accivities of Jeffer
ton. Both mn wereE
formation of a "more
but it is to be hoped
controversies the grea
will not be unduly obl'
HIGH CLASS ENTE
For several seasons.
especially the student
of the Ifaculty of thet
had the privilege of e
the finest types pro
Rockford Players ina
manner. The present
is no exception int
maageinent presents
posed of an entirely
excellent actors and
Robert Henderson h
gether a company of
all of whom have had m
in dramatic work and
is unsurpassed in an
type which will play
this summer. They a
li an opportunity tof
selected group of pl
in the finest manner, a
sponsible for a play s
any city might be pro
The plays which a
tive of differing types
that variety is paramo
son's program. They
especially for the type
compose Ann Arbor a
ences from a play-goin
appreciates the finest i
It is worthy of note
form a part of the pro
outlined by the admini
Summer Session.
The sponsors and th
of the company are t
lated on the program
arranged for the prese
n the personnel of the
they present. It is to
the Rockford Players w
most whole-hearted su
student body, members
y, and citizens of Ann
their last summer seas
EDUCATION AND
Dr. Livingston Farran
ornell university, ment
the educated person o
about health. -They are
1. The physiological
r sleep.
2. Posture and ex
mounts and proportio
rents.
3. Principles of n
ction, and the more c
ions.
4. A general underst
ex instincts in man.
5. The factors of inf
nce, and immunization.
6. The cause and pre
enerative diseases.
7. Sanitary health
ater supplies.
8. Appreciation of ne
iedical and dental exam
9. Appreciation of the
edical practitioners.
10. Knowledge of com
oblems.
Have you ever though
efore? Are you, acco

arrand's classification
Matever the answer u
'ole, the list is very
ooking over.

newly-oganized dramatic coloring is achieved by an
e financial basis intmate Chinese scene, during the
r himself to all course of which clouds of most po-
of political dif- tent incense float among the marvel-
ing spectators.
that Hamilton At any nate, the performance is emi-
central g~vern- nently worth seeing, if for nothing
a loosely con- else than to watch the Rockford Play-
f the states, but ers at work for the first time in their
s most essential new season here. One is tempted to
overnment was predict a pleasant summer, for the
waddlings. The personnel seems on the whole to be
different setting very capable.
e background of In the first place, Katherine Wick
son ari Hamil- Kelly is master of 'a bag of tricks
essential to theI which are, so far as I know, quite
perfect union," new to Ann Arbor audiences; nor do
I that in party they seem stereotypes to which she
.tness of a man may be expected to recur accurately
iterated. and tiresomely in each succeeding play
of the season. The zinc plate kind of
ERTAINMENT gesture is one into which all too many
Ann Arbor, and less experienced actors lamentably
s and members fall. Specifically, theuse which Miss
University have Kelly makes of her eye's, her hands,
njoying plays of 'her neck muscles and head gestures
)duced by the is tremendously effective. Especially
a very pleasing so in the present play. If it is pos-
Summer Session sible for anyone to be obviously sub-
that this same tle-permit me at least one paradox
a company coin- -'she is just that in "The Letter."
new group of Roman Bohnen undoubtedly has
actresses. much to contribute to the sucess of
as gathered to- the compa:ny this season. He carries
talented artists, away his part with conviction, and has
ouch experience an ability at sly innuendo. It may in-
n whose ability terest admirers to know that he made
y group of the early public appearances as an agile
in Ann Arbor cheer leader at the University of Min-
fford the pub- nesota-rooter kings, they call them
see a carefully up there.
ays interpreted George J1hnson' and Marvel Garn-
nd they are re- sey are doing some really excellent
eason of which character work as Chinese persons of
ud. not too exalted character. Miss Garn-
re representa- sey, it is true, has little to do but
are so arranged look stocal and exotic,, but she does
unt in the sea- it convincingly enough to suggest
y were chosen creditable work in more active roles.
of people who Robert Hender'son does an amusing
udiences-audi- and interesting, but not very convinc-
g public which ing educated Chinee. He is also the
n dramatic art. burnt-out and very bullet-riddled lover
that the plays (with shiny black hair) who has to
gram that was take thirty-seven measures rest, prone,
stration of the in the first act.
Lillian Bronson, who was with the
e management company before, does very well this
o be congratu- week as a not very acute but a moth-
which has been erly soul; she evidently has ability for
nt season, and excursions into much wider pastures
company which of characterization. Elberta Trow-
be hoped that bridge, given a comparatively minor
fill receive the part, shows that she can act with
pport from the accuracy and verve. Paul Stephenson
of the ifacul- has a pleasant voice and stage appear-
Arbor during ance, but doe not in this play have
on in this city. job enough to indicate satisfactorily
what he will be able to do. Martin
HEALTH Browne's acting is vigorous but un-
d, president of fortunately wooden, hampered by a
ions ten things number of graceless gestures. He
ught to know will undoubtedly acquire a more natu-
: ral manner as the season progresses.
basis of prop- One more drama scheduled for this
summer-"Chicago"-opens with gun-
ercise, types, play. The Rockford Players have a
n of food ele- great fondness for percussion.

l./l.I"l./"./.I1. I Il./ll1./°./l1.%. ./"Jt./l./ %1,/,/./Y./llJl./4 ./1.iJ.I "lI.I": ".s . ls". . ./« :". :V~./°J. "./ I././'1.0".'/. .' ./.rI. 'i.

Summer School
TEX'T

EThat Sqtisfy
Arcade Cafeteria
NICKELS ARCADE
r
M LUNCH
STATE STREET
OPTICAL
DEPARTMENT
Lenses and Frames made
To Order
Optical Prescriptions
Filled
HALLERS
State St. JJewelers

Every Day -
from 8p, m.to lIi p. M.
Rates
Per hour ..50c
7 Per day .. .. . .. .. . . 2.50 _
l2 _
S=3fAUNDER'S CNO-IVR
On the Huron River at the foot of Cedar St.
1111111111Illllllilliillilliillllll illil1111111[ t1i 1111 111illil 1 11llfllllll llillt111ii

BOOKS

Quantities of Second-Hand Books at-

wA '

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

I DON'T doubt it, nor do I wonder why. Just
open a tidy red tin and get that full fragrance
of Nature's noblest gift to pipe-smokers. Then
tuck a load in the business-end of your ol '
jimmy-pipe.
Now you've got it-that taste-that Lead-
Sme-to-it, Gee-how-I-like-it taste! Cool as a
condition. Sweet as making it up. Mello ' I
I''
and satisfying Try this mild, lon
tobacco, Fellows. I know you'll like it.'-'t
but you cans ge
open a idy redtin andget tha full fagranc
N thre naltin op smoker
tuc a a ntebsns-edoyurld
ome-Wnton-aee-owHkeiN.st! Coo.a
conitin. wee asma''g t u. Mllo

I' _
t

ormal mental
ommon devia-
anding of thej e
'ection, resist- w
vention of de- b
hazards in r
t
ed of frequent e
inations. a
standards of a
ht
m'unity health t
t
t about them t
rding to Dr. si
, educated? P
nay be, as a A
much worth o

IN DETROIT
At the Cass, in Detroit, "The Desert
Song," another of the long string of
laborate musical plays so popular in
recent years, is now in! its seventh
week. This effort does not come up to
"The Student Prince" or "The Vaga-
bond King," nor yet to "Golden
Dawn," but there are four or five
rattling male choruses, a lot of cos-
umes and uniforms, (the French For-
eign Legion again!) some good dancing,
and the very -silly story that always
accompanies operetta. The music is,
owever, generally good. The Song of
he Rifs and the Marching Song of
lhe Foreign Legion are particularly
uneful and spirited. Alexander Gray
ings and plays the leading role of
Pierre as well as anyone could ask.
k1l in all, if you care for that sort
f thing, it is worth your while to
lee "The Desert Song."

rived at'by an impartial party little 10

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan