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July 25, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-07-25

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1928

cles in the way of realization by either
of them of their several naticaal as-
rI IC t aI4Ii a pirations or the maintenance by them
of their several ligitimate domestic
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the policies."
Board in' Control of Student Publications. The trend of this resolution is Con-

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The Associated Press is exclusively en-8
titled to the useifor republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local newst
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.5o; by mail, $.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors........George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor........... Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor..............Eleanor Scribner
Music and Drama Editor.......tratton Buck
hooks Editors............ Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre r
Night Editors

Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
Howard Shout
Margaret Zahm
Isabel Charles

Martin Mol
George Simons
Clarence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

Reporters

BUSINESS STAFF1
Telephone 12141
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTERt
Advertising ..;a............. Lawrence Walklyj
Advertising.................1Jeannette Dale
Accounts.. ...............Whitney Manningj
Circulation................Bessie V. Egelano
Assistants
Samuel Lukens L illian Korvinsky
Janet Logi
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1928
Night Editor-CLARENCE EDELSON
1817 OR 1837?
Again interest is becoming more
and more intense in the matter of try-
ing to solve the long-carried-on con-
troversy regarding the exact year in
which te University of Michigan was
founded. According to the present
publicity given the University through
the official billetins, catalogues, an-
nouncements and seals, the date ap-
pears as 1837, but judging from the
wide-spread protest on the part of a
great number of alumni including
many who have studied the entire sit-
uation quite thoroughly, the date of
1817 seems to be more authenic.
The regret entertained at this late
period is that such a discussion has
beel. permitted to be prolonged when
more and mare through advertising
medium, the date of 1837 is becoming
fixed in the minds of the studnts,
alumni and friends of the University
as the correct date for its being
founded. It is obvious that such a
question should have been thoroughly
discussed and disposed of many years
ago, but somehow the Regents are not
inclined to make the change. All of
which necessitates the continued ad-
vertising of 18377 as the year in
which the University was born.
Due consideration in this matter
should be given by the Regents to the
resolution passed at the triennial held
in Chicago in May of this year, which
recommended the use of the date 1817
as the correct year for the founding
of the University. A great numbeer
of references and historical docu-
ments have been produced to show
that 1817 is the. correct date. It is
true that during the two decades fol-
lowing this date the progress of the
University was not at all steady, in
fact it was hindered in many ways.
This, however, should not prevent the
recognition of 1817 as the true year
of the University being founded.
TREATY REVISION
Representative Porter of Pitts-
burg, Chairman of the H-ouse Coi-
mittee on Foreign Affairs, advocates
immediate action on the part of the
United States government toward a
comprehensive revision of the existing
treaties with China.
The Nationalist party has almost
complete control over all of China
except the Manchurian provinces, and
according to Mr. Porter, is seeking
release from treaty obligations which
it feels to be oppressive and in de-
rogation of the sovereign dignity of
China. Treaties between that coun-
try and the United States have al-
always upheld the principle of mu-
tual frankness and equity with due
regard to conditions prevailing froi
time to time in the two countries,
while negotiations have tended to run
parallel with the progress of the two
countries and to keep abreast of it.
On January 28 of last year, the
Committee on Forreign Affairs report-
ed favorably on a concurrent resoiu-
tion which had earlier been referred
to the committee. The resolution,
which was adopted by the House,
authorized the negotilation of treaties

to replace those now in effect to the
end that "henceforth treaty relations
between tihe two countries shall be
based upon an equitable and recipro-
cal basis' and will be such a& will
not offtend the sovereign dignity of
either of the parties or place obsta-

sistent with the American policy to- I
ward China, and by immediate action
on the part of representatives of this1
country in negotilaation with a uthoriz-1
d agents of the new Chinese Govern-1
ment with regard to the satisfactory1
revision of the treaties, the friend-
ship between the two countries will
probably be made secure.
FLIGHT VALUES
It is with undue prejudice that peo-
ple are prone to sneer somewhat at
the feat that John Henry Mears, the-
atrical producer, and Captain C. B. D.
Collyer, aviator, accomplished when
they completed their circumnaviga-
tion of the world in slightly more
than 23 days, setting a new world's
record by nearly five days.
In this day, when aviators from
all parts of the world tare attempting
long distance flights for various pur-
poses and prizes, the world that stays
at home and lives a placid and urbane
life will naturally regard the adven-
turesme flights in a. reactionary man-
ner, That is only to be expected, for
it is the result of complacency view-
ing enervous adventurousness with
scorn and not a little derision.
General public opinion holds these
experimental flights to be the need-
less pastime of folly. The smug
American, while he enthuses tempor-
arily over the thrill and national pride
that sweeps over the nation when
an American aviator successfully
completes a long and hazardous hop,
is slow and reluctant to appreciate
the full significance of them, once his
ardor has cooled. The American is a
"first-nighter" and once a thing is
repeatedly accomplished to a point
close to the commonplace, he derides
it ps vigorously as he first hailed
It.
And so it is with flights. After
the panic that the first few ventures
of Lindbergh, Byrd, Chamberlin, and
a few others caused, public approval
waned with the increasing numbers.
Now the flier is regarded in the same
light as any reckless adventure-seek-
er. Mears and Collyer, whose round
the world trip was as difficult and
as dangerous as Lindbergh's receiv-
ed not nearly the acclaim offered the
latter. They are held in public view
as mere publicity seekers.
But men like Mears and Collyer
are heroes-real heroes. The men
who are costentto establish hew re-
cords and then, having made them,
to establish newer ones cause a de-
cided forward step in the advance of
science and social welfare. It is large-
ly because men like DePnalma and
Oldfield were willing to risk their
lives in the early life of automobile
racing that interest in the develop-
ment of the automobile continued and
advanced to its present fine stand-
ard. And it is the same with air-
plane development. The field of avi-
ation, in order to progress to the
ideal, must produce more men like
Mears and Collyer, men who are will-
lug to risk their lives in order to
keep !alive in the minds of the fickle
American public the flame of inter-
est.
AL SMITH AND THE PRESS
Governor Al Smith is playing the
part of the wise boy these days down
east. Although he manifests a re-
luctance to say much for publication
about the presidentialhoutlook until
after his notification, he sees news-
papermen every day and talks freely
with them on nearly every subject
except politics. It is even rumored
that he passes cigars around occa-
sionally.
While governor of New York state,
"Al" made it a practice to see report-
ers twice daily, evening newspaper-

men before noon and representatives
of morning papers late in the day. At
the present time he holds one press
conference a day-usually shortly be-
fore noon-and even holds one on
Sunday as an accomodation to corre-
spondents. If he is busy in his offices
at the state capital when it is time for
the press to confer with him, other
business is laid aside and, cigar in
hand and mouth, the conference be-
gins.
Rather obviously, Governor Smith,
in declining to talk about the presi-
dential campaign, but in showing con-
sideration-if that it may, be called-
for the press, is playing a judicious
role. More than one campaign has
been won through the columns of the
daily newspapers throughout the
country, and every day in the year
public opinion is formed through the
reading of the newspapers. News-
papermen are not easy to bias, but
they appreciate good spirit on the
part of those with whom they come
in contact. - Order another box of
cigars, Al!

f
1

0ASTE LL
VIKINGS
DESERVE
TO BE SUNK
(Editor's note: Oscar, Rolls wonder
horse, has seen a lot of rank shows in
his day, being°a regular patron of the
Roequefort players. The Vikings,
however, so moved him to indignation
that he has been permitted to present
his ihpressions as follows:)
THE RE CE PTLON
THE VIKINGS DESERVED

- 0
Such a reception as this would have
been rather kind, of course, for the
type of ham acting which the Roc-
quefort players presented in the Vik-
ings; but local audiences are used
to being indulgent with the gang. The
Sumimer Session, moreover, is re-
sponsible for the outrage and one
dares not to criticise an official Uni-
versity activity. This picture was not
posed by Robert Henderson, unfor-
tunately.
* * *
FLASHLIGHT PICTURE
OF VIKINGS AUDIENCE
Above is a reproduction of the fash-
light picture showing the first row
of the audiee at the Vikings. Since
ill aud1itorin is not a whispering
gallery, nuo one further bac~k could un-
derstand the so-called actors; though
the auditorium will sonie day he taken
for an aquarium if the Rocquefort
gang continues to play there. Many
personls are reputed to have believed
that the so-called players were speak-
lug Scandinavian throughout the per-
fornmance.
THE EMOTIONAL HIGHLIGHT ;
OF THE VIKINGS
-

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BUD GOLDEN'S WOLERINES
Playing at
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Dinner .6-7

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- . -,-.

T

This is an especially posed picture
of the emotional climax of the Vik-
ings. We don't know what it repre-
sents, but neither did the alleged act-
ors, which leaves the whole thing an
open question. It has been rumored
in several quarters that this repre-
sents the suppressed desires of the
audience after the show was over
(the, audience standing up.) No veri-
fication has been made of this rumor.
BUT THE
WORM WILL TURN

JACOBSON
Places Final
Reduction on
EVERY COAT ENSEMBLE OR
SUIT IN THE HOUSE
(White Coats Excepted)

4r

The above picture shows the worm
turning, for even local audiences can
not be fooled all of 'the time by high
sounding advertising. Some summer
the Roquefort players will come back
and find that education has actually
taken effect at the University and no
one will patronize their shows-then
the Women's League building fund
will be saved the expense of having
them here.
In justice, however, it should be
said finally that the Clavilux was ex-
cellent, and the organing of Earl V.
Moore needs no comment. The stage
hands were efficient too, and, as a
muatter of fact, all that the play need-
ed to be a success was some actors.
Next time let us have Mr. Moore, Mr.
Wilfred and the other effects un-
polluted by the Roquefort players.
And then the question always arises
-how much does the Women's League
actually get out of all this sacrifice.
OSCAR.

Positive
Reductions

L 4
AA

Original
Price
Tickets

OFF'
Out of town residents cordially invited to share in this
Final Price Cut of our July Clearance.
The Shop of Personal Service

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