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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1925 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

I

.

... .. . . ... .. ..

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A STUDY OF THE SCOPES JURY

Special Purchase for
Bargain Day

150 DRESSES

$2.9

- -

11

Striped and printed tub silk dresses, plaid
mopacs and plain broadcloth. All sizes
fro'm 16 to 46. They are regularly
$6.50. Bargain Day we offer them for
$2.98. We advise you to shop early, for
there are only 150 of them.

SECOND FLOOR

GOODYEAR'S

124 South 31ain

Phone 4171

ii

rhis striking photo of the jury
ich is hearing the case of John T.
pes, Dayton, Tenn., teacher, charg-
with teaching evolution against the
tutes of that state, shows vividly
type of men who are deciding the

Special Week-End Buick
Three layers-your favorite chocolate-zestful
pineapple ice-and a whole orchard of flavors
skillfully blended. It's a treat supreme. Don't
miss it. Your dealer has pint and y.art brick
this week-end only.

ruY

of

case. Standing at the extreme left is
Sheriff R. B. Harris. At the extreme
right is Judge John Raulston, who is
presiding. The jurors photographed
above are: Front row, left to right,
W. G. Taylor, farmer and Methodist;

J. H. Bowman, farmer and cabinet
maker and Methodist; J. R. Thomp-
son, farmer, ex-marshal and Metho-
dist; W. G. Day, farmer, Baptist; R. L.
Gentry, farmer, ex-teacher and Bap-
tist: R. L. West, farmer, Baptist.

Back row, J. G. Wright, farmer, Bap-
tist; J. B. Goodrich, shipping clerk,
Church of Christ; J. W. Riley, Bap-
tist; J. W. Dagley, farmer; W. F.
Roberson, farmer.

I

Library System
Illustrated By
Current Exhibit
By Jula Ruth Brown
Giving to the public the opportun-
ity to view the innermost workings
of the Library system is the exhibit
now taking place on the lower corri-
dors of the main Libray. Practically
every department of the Library is
represented; there are indeed few who
realize tthe vastness of the work in-
cluded in its various branches.
The work of the Ldbrary might be
dfvided into two main classes: the
regular services that the Library ex-
tends to its patrons, and that of pur-
chasing and classifying the books.
The service branch includes the rare
bbok, periodical, reference, and ex-
tension departments. Under the work
of classification comes the ordering
of the books, their classification and
cataloging, and the binding of them.
Included in Chis latter class are the
Ifniversity and Library publications.
The book first enters the Library
through the order department. It is
in this department that all publica-,
tions, catalogs, book lists, and an-
nouncements, both American and for-
eign, and any suggestions from all
sources, are received. The Library
has' agents scattered throughout the
world - New York, China, South
America, and all over the continent.
The Library really has but two class-,
es of books-new and second hand.
The sources for obtaining these books
consist in gifts, exchanges, purchas-
ing, and auctions. The last named
method is ,not as effective as might be
'imagined, as the Library is not able
to send representatives to auctions,
but must send bids by mail.
The book then passes to the classi-
fication deparment. Classification is
necessary for convenience; it pro-
vides a place for every subject and
puts all books 'of one subject in the
same place. The University Library
had been using the Dewey Decimal
system of classification, but found
that this was not as extensive as they
needed. The Library of Congress sys-
tem is being used to supplant the
Dewey system. The former is a com-
bination of letters and numerals
while the latter is compose only of
numerals. All classes of books are
being changed to the Library of Con-
gress system except those in Ancient
and Modern History, Literature, and
Medical departments.
After .the book has been classified,
it goes to the cataloging department.
This consists in giving the complete
description, on cards which are filed,
of not only the physical side of the
book, but also the literary content.
After the book has been cataloged It
to ready, for circulation.
The reference department offers
service to the public in may ways.
Every day it aids thousands of stu-
dents to find the material that they

desire. Books of clippings are kept
on topics of interest to the public.
Various kinds of reference card in-
dexes are kept: such as picture,
'1 drama, short story, and debator's
handbooks indexes. The reference
department has branches in the Sci-
ence, Engineering, Dental, and Chemi-
cal libraries. There are four grad-1
uate reading rooms which are devot-
ed to fine arts, philosophy, romance
languages, and archaeology.
The extension department offers
service of great value to many people.
Bulletins are published giving the
kind of material offered by this de-
partment, as subjects for debates,
material for teaching, and community
service. It also publishes lists of sub-
jects of current interest for general
discussion and lists of plays for high
school productions. A large map of
Michigan, which is literally dotted
with little red pins, gives an estimate
of the vast number of places to which
the extension department has sent
various kinds of material.
A department of very great interestI
to all people is that of the rare book
z collection.' These books have fur-
nished material for numerous library
exhibits, aid will probably never be
exhausted as new purchases are be-
ing made continually. The collection
of Shakespeare's works is an unusual-
ly fine one. There is also a large col-
lection of English drama. Such rari-
ties as books printed in the incu-
nalmla stage of printing, that is-
books printed before 1500, are also in-
cluded in this department.
One of the most interesting depart-
ments of the Library is the circula- I
tion department. In the exhibit rep-
resenting this branch of the Library
A List of B

are shown many graphs and diagrams
concerning the work of this depart-
ment. The circulation of books
reaches its highest point near exami-
iation time, falling very low during
vacation recesses. The day's circu-
lation at the delivery desk is highest
from 10 to 11 o'clock in the morning,
3 to 4 o'clock in the afternoon, and
from 7 to 8 o'clock at night. Examples

of the right and wrong way to make
out call slips are also shown, as well
as the list of new books for the
month.
The exhibit, which will remain
throughout the week, is one of the
most interesting that has appeared in
the Library.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

IceC

P 'r

m !

NEW CASINO PAVILION

ii

Dancing Every Night
EXCEPT SUNDAY
NAT N4ATOLI'S
ORCHESTRA ENTE TAINERS
ONE OF THE BF
This dance pavilion one of the largest an finest in the State.
WAL D LAKE, MICHIGAN
Forty-fi Minutes Drive from Ann Arbor

N

I

FSvTORE.WiDE BARGAINS TODAi

10O Off On All Furnishings

65

GARR CK Eves..2- TIME
i Wed. Mat. to $1.50 Read the Want Ads
11th Big Week Sat. Mat. 50c to $2.0
The .iracle Play of America
ANNE NICHOLS' os"BONSTELLE Glendale 9792
{j( Mats. Tuesday, Thursday
Ai be's rish Rose " PLAYHOUSE and Saturday.s ac-75c.
Woodward at Eliot. Ees. 75c-$1.50
SEE iT! You Will Eventually Downtown Ticket Office at Grinne's
W S~ fSHNOT OW! TUI:SD4AY MATINEE&
SEATS NOW
For This and Next Week. 'The Bonstelle Co.
In a comedy of Life by Philip Barry
[Author of "You and I^]
.The Yungest"l
ALSO
'A DANCE DIVERTISSEMENT"
1n I Arranged by VICTORIA CASSAN
Curtain rises on the Dance Divertissement at
8:1o nights and mats 2:10.
n ieatre cooer than home or office.

SUITS
$25 and $35 Values
at
15.0
2O0 Off Qn Spring Suits
Summer Clothing

and

WADHAMS & (o
Corner Main and Washington

pec'd1i Ilinai wmlsave YOU UULLAfl3
Entire stock of Spring and Summer Suits-including two-
piece Tropical Worsteds .....20% Off

e

TYPEW-RITERS
L. C. Smith, Underwood, Remington,
Royal, Corona and the Portables

Straw IHats
Including Panamas
Y2-Price
All $6 and $6.5 one-piece
Elastic Kut Bathing Suits
$4.85

Fancy Pull-Over Sweaters
$5 Values ...........$3.75
$6.50 Values ..:........$4.85
$12 White Flannel Pants
Wide Bottoms

CoNA

FOR SALE AND RENT

Typewriting and Mimeographing

Experienced 0

perators. Moderate Jates. P
We have made a specialty of college work
for eighteen years.

'rompt- Servic

10% Reduction on all Merchandise throughout the Store.
LUTZ Clothing Store
217 South Main St.

0. D. MORRILL
The Typewriter and Stationery Store

17 Nickles

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