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July 15, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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22

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1925

'1ON TRIL -
NOT SWORN
N THIRD DAYi
CENE ENDS SESSION;
ISSUES WARNING
REPORTERS

S DECISION

Will Present
Three Plays
During Week
A series of plays is to be presented
this week in University hall, espec-
ially for the benefit of the students of
the Summer session. The performan-
ces are to be .given by the Wisconsin
Players, the oldest Little Theater or-
ganization now in existence.
On Thursday evening, Zona Gale's
"Miss Lulu Bett" is to be given. The
high quality of this comedy of mid-
die western village 'life is indicated
by the fact that in 1921 it-was select-
ed by a jury of critics for the Pulitzer
prize, an award which is given annu-
ally to the author of the play which
these critics consider the best of the
New York season.
The "Antigone" of Sophocles, which
is to be given Friday evening, is one
of the masterpieces of, all dramatic
literature. Among the ,tragedies of
Sophocles this is perhaps the most
satisfying to a modern audience, as its
heroine is certainly the most appeal-
ing.

VIEWS FROM THE FRESH AIR CAMP

PRICE FIVE C
sI. c. TO sE l
TAGS FOR FREE

GOAL

SEIT FOR BENEFIT
ON CAMPUS IS
$400

0

I

t Issue Statement As to Action
Squashing Notion Until
Tomorrow.
(By Associated Press)
+, Tenn., July 14.-The third
he Scopes Evolution trial end-
stormy scene here this after-
ithout the jitry who will try
ig school teacher having beei
n, and before Judge John T.
had announced his decision
defense motion to quash the
ant.
s a stormy day" the judge re-
as he left the bench, from
a had a moment earlier warn-
s reporters of possible con-
court proceedin'gs because of
ion of stories intimating the
ould deny the defense motion
h. A committee of newspaper
9 named to investigate the pre-
publication.
orn occurred at the end of a,
day of waiting to learn what
t would do i response to the
s attempt to end the trial by
ing the unsoundness of the
nt and the unconstitutional-
he Tennessee statute which
,t public schools insructors
ach no 'theory of evolution
1enles thet Biblical story of
reation. When the judge at
entered the courtroom after
,of hours which he employed
ag his decision, he was met
e could make any announce-
the filing of a defense motion
that the court's practice of1
the morning sessions of court
yers be discontinued.
ition the motion asked and
d its reques) with a strong
of churchmen outside of Rhea
that if the prayer openings
) continued the court would
ome minister of the league
an those of fundamentalists to
devout appeal.
ourt then announced that he
ot publish his decision on the
motion until tomorrow, ex-
that he had been informed
ain mews reporters or services
umed to forecast the tenor of
g and had dispatched news re-
this effect.
IAT'S GOiNG ON
WEDNESDAY
eni for all women at Whit-
Lake td start from Barbour
,sium.
of. L. L Bredvold speaks on
Element of Art in Eighteenth
y Poetry," in Natural S-
uditorinm.
xncert at Hill auditorium.
Vysics "seance" in Physics
tory.
TURSDAY
wture on "Personal Experi-
in Epidemics," by Dr. V. 0.
n in Natural Science auditor-
ana Gal@s "Miss Luu Bett,"
Wisconsin Players in the au-
Lm of University hall.
YOU GOT A TAGI

PROJECT IS PRA1:
Letter From Camp Leader Ti
suits Upon Development
Boys

KEEP

KEEP"

THE

BOYS
IN
CAMP

Saturday evening's comedy, Anna
Cora Mowatt's "Fashion" is not a
grteat play. It is not even a good play,
according to any current standard.
But it is likely to be the most amus-
ing of all. It was first presented in
1845, as a satire on the ,foibles of
fashionable New.eork life in that gen-
eration. So we may laugh at the af-
fectations of our great-grandparents,
as they appeared to one of their con-
temporaries. But though the play was
meant to be a comedy, it has become
comic in ways unintended and un-
suspected by its author. Since its re-
vival two years ago, many audiences
have found irreverent delight in the
quaint devices of the plot, and in the
solemn pomposities of its dialogue.
The manners of the 1840's are not
quite far enough away from us to ap-
pear romantic; for us they have be-
come only ridiculous. The parts of
"Fashion" meant to be taken seriously
impress us as the funniest, and the
author amuses us most when she in-
tends only to be clever and elegant.
Tickets for these plays, at 50 and
75 cents each, are now on sale at
Wahr's, Slater's and Grabma's book-
stores.
FACULTY CONCERT
SE1T FOR TONIGHT
Ottis 0. Patton and James Breakey
Will Offer Piano and Vocal
Selections

RUFUS SPEAKS ON
OLD- CAVE-TEMPLE
Bult by Korean Ruler as Tribute to
Buddha; Is Fine Example of
Oriental Art

TRACES HISTORY

PUBLIC IS INVITED

The following program will be giv-
en in the fourth concert of the Fac-
ulty concert series, at 8 o'clock this
evening in Hill auditorium, by Ottis
O. Patton, tenor, formerly associated
with the Lansing Conservatory of Mu-
sic, and James Breakey, of the Con-
servatory of Music at Ypsilanti.
Pastoral with Variations .... Mozart
Rigauden.......... ........ ..Raff
Ballade in A flat.............Chopin
The Nightingale.............Liszt
Marche Militaire ....Schubert-Tausig
Mr. Breakey
Vaghissima sembeanze.....Donaudy
Sotto i Ciel............ ..Sibella
Mr. Patton
Prelude in G minor .... Rachmaninoff
Goldfish.................Debussy
Concert Arabesque.......Schulz-Evler
On Johann Strauss' "By the Beauti-
ful Blue Danube"
Mr. Breakey
Phillis Has Such Charming Graces
.......... ...Young
To the Sun.......... ....Curran
Slow, Horses, Slow .... ....Jalowicz
Nichavo...............Mana-Zucca
Mr. Patton
The public is invited.
WEAR A TAG TODAY

Professor Carl W. Rufus of the as-
tronomy department, in his lecture at
5 O'clock yesterday, gave a unique
glamour to an old cave-temple whcih
still survives with its art wonders in
a southern portion of Korea.
This cave wasmade into a temple,
Professor Rufus says, at the com-
mand of an ancient Korean ruler to
emphasize his adoption of the religion
of the god, Buddha. It is said to have
harbored a messenger of the Chinese
emperor who introduced the religion
into Korea by sending incense to the
Korean ruler as a gift of homage.
Neither the king nor his followers
knew the use of incense, so the mes-
senger explained its relation to the
rituals of Buddhism. Upon beng told
of the serious condition of the king's
daughter ,the messenger "advised the
king to offer incense to Buddha, and,
at the same time, give up a prayer
for his daughter' recovery.
This was doj4nd the princess re-
covered speedily. In his gratitude to
this new god, the king summoned dis-
tant stone-carvers and artisans and
set them to work on the cave-temple.
Forty years were necessary to its
completion.
At the present day, this temple
survives as one of the finest examples
of oriental art. The drapes on the
figures rival the elegant arts of the
Greeks. The grace of the limbs il-
lustrate an anatomical perfection. In
the center of the temple sits the
stately conception of Buddha; while
around him, in niches in the smooth
stone walls, stand fifteen mascculine
and feminine figures of significance
in the annals of the , preceding dy-
nasties.
Besides the cave, other examples
of the high civilization of ancient
Korea were given by Professor Rufus
on his lantern slides. He showed
beautiful stone-carvings from the
walls of old tombs that were still un-
touched because of the fact that most
of the tombs had been encased in
limestone.
As an introduction to his lecture,
Professor Rufus gave an outline of
the history of Korea from the tradi-
tional Tangun Dynasty down to the
Yi Dynasty of the present time. And,
as a conclusion, he spoke on each of
the several religions that had found
their way into Korean history.

DEAN BURSLEY REQUESTS
LIST OF ROOMS FOR MEN
In order that the landladies'
rooming list for men students
may be compiled immediately
for the use of new students
coming here to obtain rooms this
summer, it has been requested
by Dean Bursley that all house-
holders communicate with his
office within a few days.
This list, usually delayed until
late in the summer, has not
been of use to early room seek-
ers. It is the purpose of the
dean's office to prepare it in time
to aid these new students, be-
fore it is turned over to the Un-
ion in the fall. "We are now
preparing," stated Prof. F. B.
Wahr, "the annual rooming list
for men students. This is for
the aid, especially, of new stu-
dents looking for rooms this
month. We hope the landladies
will co-operate by calling this
office as soon as possible.
RESUME NEGNOTIATiONS
ITOAVOID0GOAL STRIKE

THE I'Tags will be sold on the cam
today for the purpose of raising
,YS ficient funds to support the Uni
sity Fresh Air camp for the rema
IN er of the season. Student Chris
association officials, under whose
rection thecamp is operated,
CAM Pr that students of the ,Summer ses:
will contribute $400, which will n
the total contribution by both
winter and the summer sessions a
$2,000.
Of the $5,000 which is actually n
ed to run the camp for one sea
there is $1,000 yet to be secured.
is hoped that the students and o
friends of the camp will give eno
money to make possible the cont
ance of the - camp for the full sea
of four ten day periods.
Providing the quotaj is reached
icamp by the end of the summer,
have entertained the largest nur
of boys since its founding in 1
So far, 120 boys have been to
to the camp each week, making
boys who will be in the camp dur
the summer. Of this number 45
from Ann Arbor, 75 from Jackson
FOR.-IOA from Flint, and 300 from Detroit
the numbers which. have been se
- 4 quotas from the towns named.
Unusually Attractive Prices WillI Be Prof. F. N. Menefee of the C011<
Placed on All Goods; Expect of Engineering and Architect
Many Buyers chairman of the Fresh Air ca
wrote the following letter concern
{ PLAN ENTERTAINMENT the camp situation to Homer H. G
ton, associate secretary of the Stud
-.Christian association:
Ann Arbor merchants are making "I have gone over your finan
preparations for the annual Bargain report, as of June 30, and wish
Day tomorrow. Goods are going to commend both you and those resi
be placed on sale at unusually attrac- sible with you for the financial c
tive prices, and large crowds of buy- duct of the camp up to this date
ers are expected to take advantage do not see how you could poss
of the bargains which may be had. have gotten better rpsults with
Parking restrictions will be raised amount of money which you h;
except on the bus routes, and free spent.
parking spaces will be provided "I have read over some of the
throuhout the business districts; ters which the boys wrote to frie
traffic rules, however must be ob- i of the camp, and was very m
served. touched by the appreciation they sh
There will be seven vaudeville acts ed for the opportunity that has b
given on the east side of the counfy given them.
building during the afternoon and "I visited the camp last Stin
evening. Three bands will furnish and ran across a boy'who had p
music on the'streets during the day ed up a sma llgarter snake. He pr
and accompanying the vaudeville. ly diplayed to me as a rattle sn
1As a at s

i
to

.
.

Atlantic City, N. J., July 14. (By A..
,P.)-Anthracite scale negotiations
were resumed today by under officials
and subordinates with only forty-eight
days remaining until September the
first, when miners say the public
hard coal bin will face a strike if the
contract expiring August 31 is not
resumed. The major question of
wages, the check off and the duration
of new contracts, any one of which is
pronounced by both sides as of crucial
importance, so far have been held in
abeyance.
Session Opens At
Biology Station
The University biological station,I
situated on Douglas Lake, opened its
17th session June 22 with an enroll-
ment of 58 students, 27 undergradu-
ates and 31 graduates. As usual the
women out-number the men, 34 to
24. The disproportion is much less
than usual.
"Old-timers" at the station contrast
these numbers with the registrations
for the session of 1911 when there
was but a single male student who
was immediately called the "co-ed," a
name which he carried for the ses-
sion. Students come from 16 states,y
ranging from Rhode Island, New York,
and North Carolina and California.

There will be a free show given on
the court house steps at 1:30 in i/
afternoon and another at 8:00 o'clock!
in the evening. The Saline band will
give a concert beginning at 6:30 in
the evening and will also give one or,
two selections after the vaudeville,
The Saline band's program, as an-
nounced by Nicholas D. Falcone, d-
rector, will be: "Theim Basses
March," Huffine; "Spirit of the Age,"
overture, Al Hayes; "Selection from
Opera Maritana," Wallace; "Inspira-
tion," overture, Al Hayes; "Corona-
tion March, The Prophet," Meyer-
beer; "Selection from Opera Car-
men," Biezt; "The Rippling Ruby
overture, Skaggs; "Aida March froiii
Opera Aida," G. Verdis; "Selection
from Opera Martha," Flotow; "Detef-
mination," overture, Al Hayes;
"March Cindnnatus," VanderCook;
"The Gypsy Festival," overture, Al
Hayes; and "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner," Key.
BaseallScores
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Philadelphia 12, Detroit 4.
Chicago 3, New York 0.
Cleveland 6, Boston 1.
St. Louis 14, Washington 3.
NATIONAL LEAGUE'
Pittsburgh 8, Brooklyn 5.
New York 6, Chicago 3.
Cincinnatti 9, Boston 6.
Philadelphia 6, St. Louis 4.
HAVE YOU GOT A TAGI

Anotner referred to a small skunk
a "little dog." It hardly seems po
ble. that there are boys as old
these were -who have no more knc
edge of the inhabitants of the wo
than these boys seem to possess.
impression they get from associat
with university men in a camp
this, and the knowledge they g
should have a lasting and benefi
impression upon them, and I am s
is worth all the time and expe
that the contributors have been pu
in maintaining the camp."
(Continued on Page Four)
Many Enroll In
LibraryivCoursi
Ninety-eight students have enro
in the courses in Library methods
fered in the Summer session of
University. As 72 students have el
ed the courses in cataloging and c
sification, it has been necessary to
sign an additional assistant to
work. Miss Charlotte Bender, '23,
accordingly been transferred from
catalog department to this new pi
tion.
HAVE YOU GOT A TAG?
Boston, July 14.-Seven men w
arrainged today on secret indictmE
returned by the grand jury which
vestigated the collapse of the P
wick club building July 4 in whicl
persons lost their lives.

en Will Meet
r League Picn
attending the League pic
at 5 o'clock tonight at B
nasum wlere Univers
11 be waiting to carryt
Whitmore Lake. The fi
ithat have signed in thec
dean of women and paid
supper will form the p

ic
nic

Car-.
ity The student body of the University
the is cordially invited to attend.'the open
rst house at the Congregational church
of- from 4 to 6 o'clock every Wednesday
25 Tea and dancing are offered as
ic- amusement. The Open house is not
limited to Congregational students.

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