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July 07, 1925 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-07

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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XVI. No. 15

ANN ARBOR; MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1925

PRICE FIVE CEN

AK STA9RTS ON
W MEDICAL UNIT
IR UNIEST

Symphonies, Host Of Stars,
Listed On Concert Programs

TURNS FIRST EARTH
'ENING CONSTRUCTION
OF BUILDING
:IFT IS $400,000

IN

tile of New Department is "Thomas
HenrySimpson Institute of,
Medical Research"
Simpson Memorial Institute, the
urth new medical unit of the Uni-
rsity is now under construction.
rs. Christine M. Simpson, the donor
tred the first shovel of sod for the
gilding June 30.
The institute will be known as the
homas Henry Simpson Memorial
stitute of Medical Research," and
il be located on the Northeast cor-
r of Glen avenue and North Obser-
;ory stroet near the New University
spital and the Observatory. The
stitute which will be devoted pri-
arily to the study of pernicious
emia will be a four story structure,
by 41 feet, constructed from Indi-
a i'mestone matchingthe adminis-
ation building of New University
spital. The first floor will be de-
ted to a reception room, offices for
rectors, library, laboratory and ex-
ination rooms. The second floor,
wever, will be given over to more
boratories
The construction of this institute
s been made possible through the
nation of $400,000 by Mrs. Simpson
it November. By terms of the gift
50,000 is to be used for the con-
ruction and equipment while the re-
aing $250,000 is to be invested in
Come-producng securities the in-E
me of which is to be used for the
yment of salaries of medical andi
entific directors and their assis-
Uts
'ROM THE FILES
TEN YEARS AGO TODAY
During the first week of the Sum-
or session approximately 15 patients
r day have received treatment at the
iversity Health service. Dr. I. H.
mmings supervises the treatment of
en students, assisted by Dr. Rrury.
Sisler won his first game in the ma-
r league Saturday, defeating Cleve-
ad by a 3 to 1 decision.. The former
chigan star fanned nine men, but
ssed as many. Seven hits were se-
red off Sisler, but all of them were
ogles. He failed to secure a hit
Insef, although he sacrificed one
his three trips to the plate.
V. R. Stockton of Indian State uni-
rsity and Dr. Tucker of Harvard,
11 lecture in the economics depart-
ont this summer. Mr. Stockton will
eture on labor and Dr. Tucker on
lance-.
FVE YEARS AGO TODAY
Members of the executive committee
the Inudustrial Research Board of
ee Michigan Manufacturers asocia-
)n will confer in Ann Arbor tomor-
owwith President Marion. Burtonl
d members of the Board of Regents
consider the organization in the
niversity of an industrial research
partment similar to the research
ireaus of the University of Illinois
id Cornell university.
Thirty-four students in the literary
llege of the University received all
V's" for last semester's ' work, ac-
arding to a report issued from Reg-
trar Hall's office yesterday.
Members of the faculty, students in
1e Summer session, and many people
om Detroit were visitors yesterday
id today at the first public display
the Greek government exhibition
Alumni Memorial hall. The exhibi-

on will be in Ann Arbor until July
Announcement is made of the mar-
age of Miss Dorothy Pettit of De-
'oit to Donald G. Coney, ex-'24, Ann
rbor. The marriage took place

(By T. G. P.)
Final arrangements for the Choral
Union and Extra Concert series of the
Pre-Festival concerts have been an-
nounced by the School of Music.
Charles A. Sink, secretary of the
School of Music has but recently re-
turned from a trip to, the East when,
contracts were signed with artists and
organizations to appear here.
Returning to an arrangement which
proved satisfactory several years ago,
the management will present two of
the greatest symphonies in the coun-
try in the Choral Union series, while
as stars, both John McCormick and
Ernestine Schumann-Heink have been
engaged. The total list for both ser-
ies contains formidable names in the
music world. Walter Damrosch and
the New York Symphony' orchestra,
Ossip Gabrilowitsch and the Detroit
organization, Ernestine Schumann-
Heink, John McCormick, Louis Grav-
eure, Cecilia Hansen, Walter Gieking,
the London String quartet, the Hin-'
shaw Opera company, and the St.
Olaf choir.
Walter Damrosch and the New York'
Symphony orchestra will appear on
Oct. 15 in the first number of the Chor- i
al Union series. It is several years
since he appeared here; if memory

serves us right, it is several years'
since the New Yorkers have taken
the road. The last time they played
here was in a series which presented
as well, Leopold Stokowski and his
great orchestra; it was in the heydayt
of Choral Union series, when Ann
Arbor was visited once and again by
artists of distinctly first rate calibre.
But symphonies are not exhilerating,
and the venture was not tried again,
for the audiences obviously prefer the
symphonic grandeur. Walter Dam-
rosch is not only one of the greatest
living conductors, but is one of Am-
erica's foremost musicians. For years,
his work in New York, with the great
choral societies of that city, the Phil-
harmonic orchestra and the sym-
phony have won him an enviable
place in the music world. He belongs
strictly to a past generation, his name
is connected with those whose art to-
day exists anly as a tradition of glory
that today seems impossible.
On Nov. 3, John McCormick will
make his third appearance in this
city. ,There have often been unkind
things said of John, things which may
have no foundation in fact, the Mc-
Cormick legend is an old and inter-
esting one around here, and has
(Continued on Page Four)

DR.H1 F1 VAUjGHAN
WILL TALK_ G
"Weather and Disease" is Subject of
Detroit Commissioner of
Public Health
IS MICHIGAN GR(ADUATE
Dr. H. F. Vaughan, Detroit commis-
sioner of public health, will lecture
on "Weather and Disease" at 8 o'clock
tonight in Natural Science auditor-
ium. a
Dr. Vaughn was born in Ann Arbor
and received his B.S. degree at the
University in 1912, his M.S. degree in
1913 and his D.P.H. degree in 1916.
Dr. Vaughan has been associate
professor of public health at the De-
troit College of Medicine since 1915
and has been commissioner of health
in Detroit since 1918. He was com-
missioned Captain of the sanitary
corps of the United States in 1917
and was in charge of the sanitary de-
partment at Camp Upton L. I., and
Camp Wheeler, Ga., during the war.
He was also appointed puenmonia'
commissioner, at that time, by the
surgeon general of the United States.

LEIDEN PROFESSOR
TO GiVE LECTURE

SC.

Van Vollonhoven Will Discuss
"Grotius and America"
Tomorrow

RECORDS SHOW LITTLE
PLACED WELL IN TRACK
Dr. Clarence C. Little, newly
elected President of the Univer-
sity, had an imposing track rec-
ord when he was at Harvard in
1908-10. He put the shot and
also broad jumped, on two occa-
sions beating Michigan men.
Records of the national intercol-
legiate meets show that he plac-
ed in the shot put in 1908 and
1909 and in the broad jump in
1910. He put the shot 42 feet,
9 34 inches in -1908 for a third
place. In 1909 he won the event
with a put of 46 feet, 2 inches,
beating Horner of Michigan, who .j
placed third.
In the broad jump in 1910 he
placed second, jumping 22 feet,
2 78 inches, just ahead of Lap
ham of Michigan, third place
winner.
CARR GIES TALK
ON LAIN TEACHING
---
Tells in Investigation of Methods by
Committee to Remedy Present
Inefficiency
FAVORS SHORTER TIME
Prof. W. L. Carr of the University
high school and of the School of Ed-
ucation, who spoke at 5 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon, lectured on "The
New Latin Program for Secondary
Schools."
Professor Carr explained that the
investigation has been carried on for
the last two years by the co-opera-
tion of a committee with 8,000 teach-
ers throughout the country. It was
made possible by the discontent with
present results.
According to Professor Carr, either
the teachers, the discontent, or the
methods are to blame for the present
inefficiency; not the pupils. The
pupils 'are different today; there are
ten times as many as there were a
generation ago, and the intellectual
level is somewhat lower. This effects
the content and the objectives..
As a remedy, Professor Carr calls
for the reduction of the time put in
on the course, and an increase of
material that is within range of the
pupils' experience.
SUMMER COURSE RULES
IDENTICALWITH WINTER
An erroneous announcement re-
garding the dropping of courses was
made in The Daily on Friday, July 3.
In correcting this notice which stat-
ed that courses could be elected or
dropped at any time during the Sum-
mer session, it is necessary to note
that practically the same rules con-
cerning the dropping and election of
courses is followed in the summer
as in the winter.
Michigan Woman
Given Carnegie
Medal Nomination

WHAT'S GOING Old

New President

TUESDAY
5:00-Prof. J. B. Polock lectures on
"Plant, Animal and Human Life
in the Hawaiian Islands," in Natural
Science auditorium.
8:0--Dr. I. F. Vaughn lectures on j
"Problems of PublicHealth Admin-
istration," in Natural cience audi-
trium.
WEDNESDAYl
5i:0-Prof. J. S. Reeves lectures on1
"Hugo Gratias," in Natural Science,
auditorium.
8:0 "International Uealtn Prob-
lems," by Dr. H. S. Cummings, in
Natural Science auditorium.
Varsity Men Win
Places In Meet
Two Michigan athletes took places
in the A. A. U. state meet at Belle Isle,
Detroit, on July 4.
R. H. Callahan, '26, cross country
-captain, won the mile run after trail-
ing three quarters of the distance be-
bind representatives of the various
Detroit athletic clubs. His time was
4:36.5. Lowell Mason, '28, was also
entered in this event.
In. the half mile H. E. Pfluke, '27M,,
took third, following Phillips of the
Canadian Olympic team and Seegar,
crack Detroit interscholastic man,
over the line. H. R. Huff, '27D, was
entered in the pole vault, but did not
place.

SECURED BY REEVES
Prof. C. Van Vollonhoven of the
University of Leiden will deliver a ,
lecture an "Grotius and America" at
5 o'clock tomorrow in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
Hugo Grotius was a famous Dutch7
publicist who- lived in the 17th cen-
tury. He was also a theologian, jur-
ist, and historian. He also composed
many poems in the Latin and Dutch1
languages and stranslated Greek
poems into his native language.
"Mare Liberum" is the name of hist
first book, but "De Juri, Belli et Pac-
ic" is probably the most famous and1
regarded as the most influential of all
his works.nI
Professor Van Vollenhoven is tak-
infthe place of Prof. J. S. Reeves
of the political science 'department.
POLLOCK WILL TALK ON
LIFE IN HAWAII TODAY
Professor James B. Pollock of thef
botany department will deliver an4
illustrated lecture at 5 o'clock this
afternoon in Natural Science auditor-
lum on "Life in the Hawaiian Islands
-Plant, Animal, and Human".
Professor Pollock spent the sum-
mers of 1922 and 1924 in the Hawaiian
Islands, and in the summer of 1923,
he went on a scientific expedition to
the Island of Wake. This expedition
was described in the last issue of the
Nationjal Geographic magazinle.
While in the Hawaiian Islands he
made a special study of the coral
reefs, and brought back various ma-
terials from the coral reefs and from
the expedition for the botanical li-
brary of the University to aid in the
further study of the biological prob-
lems involved therein.
Will Serve Tea
At Betsy Barbour
The Women's League and Betsy
Barbour house will act as hostesses
to all women of the University at an
informal tea to be given from 4 until
6 o'clock today on the south porch of
Betsy Barbour house.
Prof. T. E. Rankin of the rhetoric
department, and Mrs. Rankin, and
Prof.R. W. Cowden of the rhetoric
department, and Mrs. Cowden, will
be the faculty guests invited by the
students.

3KBT WILBUR REPTO
Prepare Welconie for Navy Secretary;
Crowds Seek Building
Permits
TREMORS AGAIN FELT
Santa Barbara, Cal., July 6.-(By
A.P.)-City officials today seased ac-
tivities in connection with the recon-
struction of their quake shattered
business district longuenough to plan
an official reception for Secretary of
the Navy Wilbur, who is evpected
here tomorrow.
A committee representing civic or-
ganizations will meet the Secretary at
the railroad station at 6 o'clock, to
take him to breakfast, conduct him
through the damaged section of the
city, and then drive with him to Los
Angeles.
, One of the busiest offices in the
city today was that of the building
inspector which was beseiged by
throngs seeking building permits.
None but permits for temporary struc-
tures, however, are being issued.
Santa Barbara, Calif., July 6.-(By
A. P.)-Santa Barbara experienced a
recurrence of the earth tremors to-
day. Four or five distinct quivers were
felt between 11 a. m. and 2 p. m., the
most pronounced coming about 1:45
O'clock. Two quick, sharp jolts caus-
ed occupants of buildings to take
notice, but no damage or excitement
followed.
ICL UILDING WILL
BE READY IN SEPTEMBER
Although the construction work on
the new Medical building was entirely
completed several months ago it will
hot be ready for occupancy until Sep-
tember, according to information giv-
en out by Raymond F. Horton, Uni-
versity cost engineer, who is taking
the place of Prof. John F. Shepard,
supervisor of building plans, while
he is on his vacation.
A delay in the delivery of equip-
ment which is all that remains to be
done to the building is the cause for
the building having been idle for so
long oa period. Six hundred soap stone
pinks and various other equipment for
the laboratory tables will be installed
as soon as they are delivered and will
mark the completion of the building.
The physiology, bacteriology, and
anatomy departments will be housed in
the building.
Swampscott, Mass., July 6.-Formal
announcement was made at the sum-
mer White House hlre today that'John
B. Stetson, Jr., of Philadelphia, had
been appointed minister to Poland.
Albion, July 6.-Thousands of vis-
itors thronged Albion today for the
second and-final day of the home-com-
Ing celebration.

DEFENDANT DENIED
RESTRAININ6 ORDER GOE' 3 [11
FEDERAL JUDGE WILL NOT STOP
PROSECUTION BY
STATE
'PREPA ED'-DARROW
Chief Counsel Claims Further Action
Will Be Taken; Darrow
States Opposite
Cookville, Tenn. Jul y6, (By .A. P.)
-Federal Judge John J. Gore this
afternoon refused to issue an order
restraining the state, of Tennessee
from prosecution of John T. Scopes in
the state courts on a charge of violat-
ing the Tennessee statute prohibiting
the history of theories of evolution in
state schools. Scopes, scheduled to go
on trial in Rhea county court Friday,
sought, through his counsel, to have
the federal court block the state pros-
ecution, looking to transfer of the
case to the United States courts.
John Gore held that Scopes was in-
dicted in Rhea county, that the case
is still pending there, and that the
defense had failed to show any extra-
ordinary reason :why the federal court
should intervene in the case. Dr.
John Neale, chief counsul for Scopes,
gave notice that in the- near future he
will renew his petition for an injunc-
tion at Chatanooga before Judge
Xenophone Hicks, presiding judge of
the United States court for the east-
ern district of Tennessee.
Chicago, Ill., July 6. (By A.P.)-
Clarence S. Darrow, an attorney for
the defense in Scopes- trial, when told
tonight by the Associated Press that
Intervene in the state's prosecution
of Scopes, said that no further action
by the defense was contemplated prior
to the opening of the trial Friday.
"We anticipated the demands of the
injunction," and are prepared to go
to trial Friday. There is not suffi-
cient time left before the trial for an
appeal to the Circuit Court of Appeals,
and it is doubtful if that court would
handle the appeal."
CAMPUS IMPRIVMENTS
TEMPORARILY IITED
There has been but slight activities
in repairing and improving the
buildings on the campus lately owing
to the fact that July 1 marks the end
of the fiscal year of the Buildings
and Grounds department, and hence
owing to the financial situation any
extensive improvements will be im-
possible for the next felv.weeks.
However, the medical library locat-
ed at the southwest corner of the
second floor of the general library is
being repainted, new equipment in-
stalled, and new linoleum laid. When
these improvements have been finish-
ed a very complete medical library will
be available.
A new painting machine was recent-
ly purchased by the University which
will save a large amount of labor.
This machinehas been tried out on
the painting job being done in the
general library and has proved very
efficient.

Baseball Scores
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Chicago, 1, 3, Cleveland 3, 4.
No other games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Washington 8, Brooklyn 4.
Philadelphia 0, 10, New York 6, 6,
No other games scheduled.
IRON MOUNTAIN TO GET
MICHIGAN POLICE POST
Iron Mountain, July 6. -- Another
state police post for the upper penin-
sula is to be established in this city,
according to a plan under construc-
tion by the state department of public
safety.
Manila July 6.-Manila celebrated
- dependence Day with the largest.
parade held here in many years.

Miss Fadelma Hoffstetter,

'26,

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Roff-
stetter, Ann Arbor, has been nomina-
ted for a Carnegie medal, awarded
yearly to persons doing acts of out-
standing bravery.
Two weeks ago while spending the
week-end at Bass Lake, where the'
Hoffstetters have a cottage, she heard,
calls of help from two children who
had gone beyond their depth in the
lake. Miss Hoffstetter, fully clothed
dived in the water and swain to their
rescue. They were exhausted but
she managed to bring one safely to
shore and made several brave though
futile attempts to save the other.
More than 20 public health nurses
and instructors attended a Fourth of
July picnic held at the Fireside Sat-
urday evening. Games, stunts, and
dances comprised the entertainment.

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