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July 01, 1925 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

Og~an Bail'
AL NEWSPAPER OF THE
ERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
every morning except Monday
University Summer Session by
in Control of Student Publica-
ociated Press is exclusively en-
e usefor republication of all news
credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news pub
at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
s second class matter.
ion by carrier, $1.so; by mail,
Press Building, Maynard Street,
, Michigan.
cations, if signed as evidence of
will be published in The Summer
he discretion of the Editor. Un-
imunications will receive no con-
The signature may be omitted in
if; desired by the writer. The
aily does not necessarily endorse
ents expressed in the communica-

European spectators, tired of seeing
the American athletes win event after
event, started to jeer every effort
that was made by them, and even
jeered when the American flag was
raised to show the victory of our ath-
letes in the day's events.
We can hardly conceive of an Am-
erican crowd doing that. Americans,
through being constant spectators at
and participants in all sorts of ath-
letic contests, have developed a spirt
of° sportsmanship and, fairplay, that
cannot be equaled by any nation in
the world. And the development of
that spirit was only possible through
such games as have been developed
here, especially by our schools and
colleg'es.
And that spirit does not end with
athletics; it carries over into our
daily life, our relations with each oth-
er, our mastery of self. Our games
have done more for the nation than
they have been given credit for doing,
and they can do still more.

OASED ROLL
GRAPEFRUIT
GRAPENUTS
RAISINS - j

THE
FOUNTAIN

For an appetizing light L
A Toostwich or a box of

At last it has dawned on us. For
a week the dear brethern have been
exploding bombs in our bedroom at
night, dropping them with dire in-
tent upon our unprotected head as
we. left the building. Vaguely we
wondered why, but at last it has
dawned on us (as we 'said before).
Within the week it will be the
FOURTH OF JULY. Hot dam!
Add Doris Blake
Dear Tamam.
Have you seen it? It's in town. It's
a her what has captured my heart.
You should saw it! Got a new dress
on every, twice a day or. more or less
frequently. She makes the supple
willow look like a concrete trestle.
Oh, Mr. Tamam, what shall I does and
why?
-Peat Bog.
* * *
Daily Dissertation

ROOM
BEAUTIFUL

fresh delicious

(s*

BETSY ROSS CANDIES

In The Arcade

SI

OPENEVENIN(
F006OO AND NECESSITIES

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4924,

MANAGING EDITOR"*'
NORMAN R. THAL
Editor...........Robert S. Mansfied
Editor............Manning Houseworth
man of the Editorial Board.........
.Frederick K. Sparrow, Jr.
en's Editor...............Marion Mead
aph Editor.........Leslie S. Bennetts
Editor.............Willard B. Crosby
Editor...........W. Calvin Patterson
Assistants
m T. Barbour Marion Meye
el DuBois Catherine Miller
C. Finsterwald Robert E. Minnich
rine Lardner Kenneth B. Smith
Lehtiner Nance Soloms
ge E. Lehtiner Marion Welles
pR. Marcuse Mary L. Zang

CAMPUS OPINION
A gi onymous .communii-ations will be
disregar d. The names of communi-
,ants wi , however, be regarded as
confidential uLcon request'
ADDING INSULT TO)INJURY
To the Editor:
The communication signed "Teach-
er," which appeared in your columns
a few days ago, only echoed views
which I have had ever since "I came
on the campus for this Summer ses-
sion. I, too,, walked the diagonal
some years ago when men were men.
But I, too, have reluctantly been forc-
ed to, the opinion that times have

~ -
) -,
+ ,/

COLLEGEGROCER"
516 East William Street near Maynard
NEW CASINO PAVILION
Dancing Every Nigh
EXCEPT SUNDAY

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
B*SINESS MANAGER'
JOIN W. CONLPN
ising................Thomas
its...................harles
tion'...............Kermit
aton................ itrank"1

....,.

Olmstead
Daugherty
K. Klein
Schoenfeld

WEDNESDAY; JULY 1, 1925,
Night Editor-W. C. PATTERSON
NOT A DUTY-A RIGHT
It seems inevitable that every so,
'ten there must be great natural dis-
sters. When such disasters occur
a countries which cover a small area,
iey become national; when they oc-
ur in countries which cover extre-
aely large areas, there is always a
endency to consider them as section-
That is likely to be the case in the
nited States in the event of a great
isaster such as the present one
aused by the great earthquake. along
hie western coast. We who live hun-'
reds of miles away from the scenes
f ruin and destruction are too apt
o regard the plight of our country-
nien in the west in an impersonal,

changed.1
This was illustrated perfectly on
my first visit to my sorority house.
One evening I thought I would go up
after dinner and meet any girls in
the active chapter who might be at-
tending the Summer session. I start-
ed up the walk and heard a voice
through an open upstairs window,
"Wonder who this old hen coming here,
might be? Slip on something and go
down and see what she wants." Those
words rang home. They typify the
modern co-ed.
Then as for the men, they are a
lazy lot. In their sissified white
knicker',ockers, light girlish sweat-
ers,and with their cigarette-smoking,
squandering ways. I don't wonder
that the Ypsi boys threw them in the
pond. It must disgust a real man to
see them come to his town,, his
school, and continually "fuss" around
with the girls.
I understand there is much .talk
about the Michigan "man" not stoop-
ing to go with the Michigan co-eds.:
There likely is a reason. They prob-
ably got "proud" after being turned
down so many times. I don't know
what the Ypsi .fellows are like, but
they cannot help but be more desir-
able than the average run of loaf-
ers disporting themselves on this
campus.
These are just a few things that I
4 would like to have the young people
know that we former 'students notice
when we come back.
ANOTHER TEACHER.

Today's Topic: On Women.
On this last beautiful June night
what could be more appropriate than
a dissertation on women? (Yes, Aloy-
sius, we know that it's July 1 now,
but it was June 30 when we wrote
this.)
Women are-oh, say, by the way, as
we were passing the Library yester-
day, we saw a baby carriage stand-
ing out in front.! There ought to be
something in that, hey? (Owosso pa-
pers please copy.)
As we were saying, women are-say,
didja see that funny looking Ford
(adv.) that came through from Texas
the other day, didja, huh?
They are, uh,-Shut up, will yu,
we're, trying to think!
Well, anyway, women are-uh-aw-
Hell, page Solomon.
* * *
Olaf the Great's Sleepytime Story
I
"Wake Up, Little Dears!"
Uncle Olaf is just awakened from
a horrible dream by the infernal
machine illustrated. He is not in a
good humor today my dears, so be
quiet and don't snore while he's talk-
ing.
Well, anyhow, the night "mare" was
an animal story, the result of two
hot dogs and one with. Picture of the
guilty one is shown below.
ArWoof!t

NAT NATOLI'S
ORCHESTRA ENTERTAI~

ONE OF THE BEST

This dance pavilion is one of the largest an finest in I

Read the Want Ad-s

WALLED LAKE, MICHIGAN,

Forty-five Minutes Drive from Ann Arbor

IF ,

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at

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stant manner.
Of course we sympathize with the
ctims of the disaster, and feel that
we were, only west of the Rockies
at. we would do anything, everyth-
g, to help alleviate their suffering.
it we feel that since the disaster is
far away, it is really no concern of
rs. We have done enough when
e have betrayed a casual interest by
ading the newspaper .accounts of
e suffering and hardships, and have
emingly felt sympathetic, while in
ality we may have felt a sprt of
ation over the fact that there was
mething more in ourmorning paper
an North Pole flights, evolution
ials, Chinese uprisings, and the
eek rebellion.
Our interest is go apt to be imper-
nal, distant; we do not think of
lat our own feelings would be were
e thrown into a similar plight. We
not realize that placed in the same
edicament, we would think it only
ght and humane for the entire na-
on-the entire world-to come to
ir relief. It is natural for people
ho have met with some great dis-
ter to feel that their troubles are,
id should be, shared by all civiliza-

SUBSCRIBE

NOW

'umuwr

i
R
t
t.
,
it
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.
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^.

We do not know whether the people.
Santa Barbara, Cal., Helena, Mont.,
d the other districts that were tc
y extent destroyed by the recent
ries of earthquakes will want, or
cept, outside aid. But it is surely
ly right, only humane, that the cit.
ns of every community in the Un-
d States should at least make sortle
er of assistance.
THE GOOD IN ATHLETICS
'Our games have values more im-
rtant than the development of phys-
ae or the amusement of immense
rongs," said Major J .L. Griffith,
nference commissioner of athletics,!
his address Monday night. And
might have- gone farther, and
d showed the superiority of the
aerican spirit over that of the peo-

EDITORIAL COMMENT
NO GIDDY COLLEGE CROWI),
THIS-
(The Daily Illini)
No giddy college crowd is this, the
student body of the summer school
session. Of bejewelled shirt fronts
and King Tut golf hose, of collitch
trou and embroidered chiffon rilled
stockings there are few.. The downy
cheek and above-the-knee skirts have
given way before the encroachment
of tucked in collars, white socks, 18
inch bottoms, and cotton stockings;
stiff beards and longer skirts betray
the person who comes to school for
business.
School teachers, coaches, the overly
ambitious undergrad, special stu-
.dents and grads too, and of course
the usual allotment of flunkers and
ne'er do wells to gripe the univer-
sity instructors.
Business-that's what brings most
summer school students here. Of cut-
ting, very little, says acting dean
I Fred Turner. Why should one cut
when one is here - perish the
thought!-to go to school. Of drink-
ing, about the same proportion, and
of other disciplinary infractions, a
very small amount of trouble for the
rest of the summer, is Dean Turner's
guess.
There's an almost grim determina-
tion about these hefty coaching per-
sons, an expression of let's-get-going
with the teachers, which is enough
almost to alarm the so-called real
college student. Most of these lat-
ter might get trampled in the rush.
No giddy college crowd, this.

.AL

Poor Uncle Olaf was out in the
street in his , night shirt (this is a
dream, remember) with an angry
wolf chasing him down State street.
All of a sudden the wolf turned into
the whole Ann Arbor police force
and he kept right on chasing Uncle
Olaf. When Uncle Olaf saw this he
felt much relieved because he knew
that as he passed Bill and Merts
(adv.) the police force would "beat"
it for food.

This paper contains all the news of the events
going on around the Campus. ... Also all
official news from the faculty 'to the student

PRIC E S

I

$1.50 Local'

$2.00 Foreign

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS

Press Building

Phone 21214

But to put the whole thing in a
nutshell, Uncle Olaf suddenly found
himself surrounded by a bevy of beau-
tiful bims, and they all wanted to
know where he got his nightshirt,
but the tag was on the inside, and
he wouldn't show them, and they
were fighting him when the alarm
clock went off.
-Olaf the Gre t.
* * *
How's the Directory Working?
Tamam.

SUB~mSCRIBE

NOWA

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: of spir:

in our European
Ily noticeable at
last summer in

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