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June 30, 1925 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-06-30

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AND WARMER
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ASSOCIAT
PRESS

DI)A ANIP NIUIIT I
SERICE

No. 10

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 1925

PRICE FIVE

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T QUAKE

S HAKES

SANTA

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R ANNUAL TRIP
. E. R. SMITH ARRANGES FOR
COIMMODATIONS OF UNI-
VERSITY PARTY
XLY 10 IS DATE
Day Trip Planned; Co4t Esti-
ed at $25; Group Will Visit
noints of Interest at Fabll
. E. R. Smith of the geology de-
But returned yesterday from a
Niagara Falls, where hie cor-
arrangements for the annual
er session trip to the Falls. The
ry being offered to those inter-
in such a trip is due to the
3y which is being extended to
rty by transportation compan-
over companies and .manufac-
plants. As has been arranged,
hedule will be as follows:
party will leave Ann Arbor at
ck Friday afternoon, July 10, by
1cars, arriving in Detroit in
,o take, the Greater Detroit at
clock. Reservation of state-
in a special section have been
for the University party. Spe-
rs will carry the party to Ni-
Falls immediately following its
in Buffalo, N. Y., at 8:30 o'-
Saturday morning,
hand luggage is to be left on
ecial cars frem which it will
.en to the Temperance House,
sity party headquarters at Ni-
Falls. After being conducted
the plant of the Carborundum
ny of America by special
the group will walk to the
0,000 model of the falls, where
rill be shown the various en-
ng plans for saving the falls
creasing the power output. This
g is reserved for large parties
ducational institutionsor engi-
J societies. From' there the
will proceed to the Shredded
ulant
:45 o'clock the party will as-
at the Niagara Power com-.
the largest power plant in the
y, where special guides will
them about. At 2:15 o'clock
Gorge route cars will be avail-
the power plant. These cars
p for 30 minutes each at Table
Horseshoe Falls, the Whirlpool,
a Glen. Foster Flats, and
s Monument. The return to the
Niagara Falls will be made via
wiston lnd Gorge route. The
g will l e spent viewing the
ws'ispecially illuminated from
nadian side.
ay will be spent visiting Goat
the Cave of the Winds and
points of interest. At 3:45 o'-
pecial cars will leave for Buf-
om the car line station. The
expected to dock in Detroit
clock on Monday, allowing for
turn to Ann Arbor by special
a time for 11 o'clock classes.
imperative that all those who
to take this trip leave their
ames at room G-323, Natural
e building, this week. The ac-
cket sale will be held on Thurs-

Seeks

Tax Cut

GRIFFiTH PRAISES
ATHLETICS; SAYS
VALUE IS SOCIAL

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COL. COOLIDGE'S CONDITION
BETTERI

Sen. W. J. Harris, Georgia, is seek-
ing support for an amendment to the
income tax act exempting married,
persons with an income )f $5,000 or
less.
SAULE OF SUMERX
Copies Available on Campus and At
Local Bookstores; Price Set
At, 25 Cents
INCLUDES CITY MAP
Sale of Summer Student Directories
will begin at 8 o'clock this morning.
Tables will be located in front of the
Library on the diagonal, in Angell
hall, and at other places oa the cam-
pus where the books will be sold for
25 cents per copy. It will also be
possible to obtain the directories at
any of the State street bookstores.
It is advisable to purchase copies'
early in the day since only a limited2
number of the directories havebeen
printed. The sale will continue
throughout the day as long as the
supply holds -out.'
The directory lists, the names of
all students registered in the Univer-,
sity for the Summer session. It
gives the department in which they
are registered, their Ann Arbor street
address, the name of their home town,
and their Ann Arbor telephone num-
ber.
A two-page map of Ann Arbor
showing the location of the University
buildings, fraternity and sorority?
houses, railroad stations, hotels, pub-
lic buildings, and churches is also
included. Printed in the back of the
book is a program of special lec-
tures, entertainments, and excur-
sions.

COMMISSIONER JIlTS AT STAND
OF C0)lILERCIALIS31
O PPONENTS
SETS NEW QUESTION
"Was the Money Acquired Honestly?"
Is Basis of Judging Aspect
of Commercialism
Instead of condemning athletics on
the ground of financial success, the
questions, "Was the money acquired
honestly?" and 4"Has the money been
spent wisely?" Major J. 'L. Griffith,
commissioner of athletics of the Wes-
tern Intercollegiate conference, said
should form the basis of the discus-
sion of the commercial aspects of ath-
letics, in his address last evening on,
"The Place of Athletics in the Educa-
tional Program."
Major Griffith said that one of the
reasons for the criticism of athletics
from this point of view is the fact
that people of the Middle West are
unused,- as are those of the East, to
large building programs for the ben-
efit of physicaleducation.
"Our games have values more im-
portant than the development of phys-
ique or the amusement of immense
throngs," continued Major Griffith.
These are the social values which
show themselves in traits of character,
which are encouraged in no other
place as they are in competitive ath-
letics. Initiative, the capacity for
self-government, the spirit of fair
play, and the willingness to accept de-
feat without excuse are such qual-
ities.
Commenting upon the criticism that
the present coaching system kills in-
itiative on the part of the player,
Major Griffith suggested that the suc-
cessful coaches are the ones who
have developed this quality in the
players of their teams. He said that
an over-coached team is as handicap-
ped as the ill-coached.
II
WH AT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
4:00General reception for Su'nner
session students in Alumni Memor-,
ial hall.
8:00-Illustrated lecture by Prof. F.
W. K lsey on "The Scud Amer-
ican Expedition to the Near East.';
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion to Cass Technical
High school, and Hotel Statlr.
5,1:00-3:r. ..Frank Tailnemnbaunm lee..
tures on, "The Meaning of the Mex-
ican Revolution."
8:00-Concetby faculty of the lUni-
versity School of Muusic at Hill au-
ditorium.

Plymouth, Vt., June 29.-(By
A.P.)-Steadily gaining ground
" in uphill battle for life, Col.
John Coolidge, the President's
80 year old father was resting
comfortably tonight, apparently
out of danger.
Throughout the day and night,
the President and Mrs. Coolidge
who hurried here yesterday from
Swamscott, remained within
call.
They were told that the pa-
tient's age, the faulty action of
heart and other infirmaries made
complications possible and that
it would be another 24 hours at
least, before he would be out of
danger.

SUNDE LAN U6ES
English Legal System is Topic of
Law Professor in Address; Ex.
plains British Bar Education
OLD CUSTOMS PREVAIL
"Speedier justice in the American
judical system," was urged yesterday
afternoon by Prof. E. R. Sunderland,
of the Law school, in an address in
Natural Science auditorium. "Adop-
tion of several of the advantages of
the English legal system is the rem-
edy for the failings of the American
bar," Professor Sunderland declar-
ed.
Speaking of the British courts the
professor mentioned that "the legal
establishment of London is the most
remarkable in the world." The Inns
of the Court and the law courts are
situated on a 100 acre tract of land,
in the heart of London, devoted ex-
clusively of the persuance of justice,
The Inns of the Court are the Legal
Universities of England. Each Inn
has it's chapel, dormitory, and com-
plete equipment. This institution is
600 years old. As all lawyers and
judges are members of the Inns the
personal contact between them and
the students is one of the best parts
of the education. The stapdards
there are not as high as in the Un-
ited States as many of the students
who some there have no intention of
practicing but attend primarily for
the social life of the Inns. Every
practicing tlawyer must be educated
in the Inns. There is an old tradi-
tion in connection with this: that
before a lawyer is admitted to the bar
he must have eaten 72 dinners in the
Inns.
The British method of appointing
the jury differs from ours. Five min-
utes before the case is to be called
the clerk swears in 12 men and the
case is then called. The juries
feel, in this way, that they have been
elected by the judge. "There is a very
close and harmonious feeling between
the two, and they really constitute the
court. Howver, the judge has com-
plete control of the court. The cry
of "obpection" is never raised, as the
central point in the British courts is
to get at the merits of the case and
not waste time.
"Many of the old traditions still ex-
ist," said Professor Sunderland, in
closing, "and it is the fact that they
do not congict with the modern legal
systems which is of great interest to
the public."
First Outlander
On Campus Today
"The Outlander," the first summer
edition of The Inlander, self-styled
campus literary magazine, will appear
on the campus this morning. This
is the first attempt that the editors
have made to carry on publication
during the Summer session. Copies
may be bought in the lobby of Angell
hall or at Wahr's bookstore, single
copies selling at 20 cents,

Santa Barbara, Cal., June 29, (By A.P.)-A series of earthquakes, des-
cribed by survivors as rocking and swaying the business center of Sana
Barbara. as if it were on a turbulent ocean, early today left the princ'pa
structures of the channel city a mass of debris and ruins. The loss of
life was not large, due to the tremor occurring at 6:44 o'clock in the morn-
ing and also that the mass of ruins fell in the second earthquake some
fifteen minutes after the first tremor.
Estimates of the l9ss varied from $3,000,000, a "conservative" figure b:
the city manager to $30,000,000, a fig
ure quoted' by the city engineer.
Indications are that 12 lives were
lost although this rests upon the re
covery of several bodies asserted to be
in the ruins.
IState street, the main thorougfr

ARBARA; 2011
ARBR 1DIPOPERTY DAMA6E ESTIMATED
AT 8l'30,00099000 WHEN EARTH
BREAKING DAM THREA ENS CITY WATER
SUPPLY; MACADOO MAKES MOVE
FOR REBUILDING AREA

I

i

Cooperation of Teachers n )-odern is a ghastly avenue of ruins, porti
Foreign Languages Essential of its most stately buildings be
To Survey's Success tumbled down, and cornices, w
- and fronts of practically all princi
WORK WELL UNDER WAYI sLractures shattered.
-- The earthquake continued throu
In outlining the aims and methods out the day. It menaced the wa
of the survey of modern language supply by crushing out the dam
teaching, Prof. Algernon Coleman of Sheffield resevoir but a bypath h
the University of Chicago, emphasized been established to a main reserx
the cooperation of the teachers of I
modern foreign languages in the sec- pfor the cityl

ondary schools, normal schools, and
univei'sities in order to carry through]
the survey which is now quite well
under way.
The aim of the survey according to
Professor Coleman, who is a member
of the investigating committee of'
Which Professor Fife of Columbia uni-
versity is chairman, is to collect im-
portant statistics through question-
-aires which will show the existing
conditions in the department of mod-
ern foreign languages in the various'
secondary schools and universities.
The survey also aims to develop in-
struments to test the results of the
survey's efforts in its fields of activ-
ity. Its most important aim, how-
ever, is to enlist the active colabora-
tion of the teachers, and advanced
students in modern languages in in-
vestigating such problems as at what
age a foreign language should first
be taught, or how many students
there should be in one class.
Professor Coleman asserted that al-
though the survey has only been un-
der way for a few mouths, many
prominent men are devoting a great
dell of time to it.'

,

I

The terror-stricken 30,000 inhabit
ants in most cases settled down to
,:. emergcncy existance by noon
many of them living on the lawn.
Along the main thoroughfare, State
street, there were many automobiles
and trucks which had been parked a'
the curb and which had been almos
buried ander the debris.
The finest building in town, the Sai
Maricos, a big four story firs't clas:
structure, built as an L on a cor
ner had its whole corner center push
ed into the debris.
Plans for the rebuilding of the de
vasced residental and business cent
ers of this city are already unde
way.
William G. MacAdoo of Los Angeles
who owns one of the finest residence
in the city, led a number of financier
in arranging with the local Chambe
of Commere for reconstruction at
meeting here this afternoon.
MacAdoo suggests that the clear
ing houses' of the state furnish a re
volving loan fund of $2,500,00 for th
purpose of assisting in the rebuildin
of the business district of Santa Bar
bara.
At the first meeting of the Char
ber of Commerce it will be drafte
and worked into 'shifts in order tha
rebuilding may start at once.

FACULTY WILL RECEIVE kY WILL SPEAK ON
TODA A1TALUMNI HALL1 NEAR EAST WORK TODAY'

I _ 1

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3
~1

ly 9, between 1:30 and 5:30 'Students of the Summer session
at the Summer session office, will be given an opportunity to meet
in University hall. The cost informally at the reception from 4 to
Son for the trip will be con- 6 o'clock this afternoon in Alumni
y reduced by three persons Memorial hall.
ig one stateroom. A safe es-
f the entire cost, allowing for Those who will receive are Acting-
a stateroom, is $25. President and Mrs. Alfred H. Lloyd,
Regent and Mrs. J. E Beal, deans of
ton, Ill., June 29.-Kenneth the various schools and colleges and
on of Drake university was their wives, deans and representa-
inounced as the new athletic tives of the Summer session and their
y at Northwestern university. wives.
recently gained notice by his With the exception of the past two
against the manager of years it has been the custom to give
.urmi. I a similar reception at the beginning
of every Summer session. It was
uth, Vt. June 29.-(By A.P.)- suggested by faculty members and
it Coolidge today directed Act- students that the custom be resumed
etary of War Davis and Sec- this year. A group of st-dents from
1ilbur of the navy to give all Betsy Barbour house will act as

Prof. F. W. Kelsey of the Latin de-
partment will talk tonight on "The
Second American Expedition to the
Near East" at 8 o'clock in the Natur-
al Science auditorium. Professor
Kelsey has just returned from this
section of the world where he has
made excavations and done research
work.
The University expedition, made
possible by a 'gift from an unan-
nounced donor, has spent the past two
years in Asia Minor, Egypt, and
Northern Africa. The results and
discoveries have surpassed expecta-
tions, Professor Kelsey states. He
will use slides to illustrate his lec-
ture.
Muskegon Heights, June 29.-Elec-
tors here approved the issuance of
$330,000 of school bonds.

GRY IS NEW, PRESIUENT I
OF MICHIGN A, P.BODY1
I
Port Huron, June 29.-J. S. Gray,
managing editor of the Adrian Tele-
gram, Sunday was elected president
of the Michigan Associated Press Ed-
itorial association in annual conven-
tion here. Besides re-electing all oth-
er officers, the association named Ar-l
thur R. Treanor of the Saginaw News-
Courier to represent Michigan on the
advisory board of the central division
of the Associated Press. Other officers
re-elected were: Vice-president, A.:
L. Miller, Battle Creek Enquirer-
News; secretary, David J. Wilkie, As-
sociated Press, Detroit, members of}
the state advisory board; W. H. Gus-
tin, Bay City Times-Tribune; Archie
McCrea, Muskegon Chronicle, and
Raymond M. Foley, Pontiac Daily!
Press.,
In the value of her fishing indus-
tries and products Japan is said to be
ahead of all ther countries,
Gene Tunney says he wants to fight
Jack Dempsey without being forced to
tangle first with Harry Wills.

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1MONTANA NEAR 550$

Helena, Mont., June 29. (By A.P.;
While stricken Santa Barbara prep.
ed to take inventory of its disast
the task of checking up damage de
by earthquakes throughout Monta
over the last three days proceeded
day with indications that total prc
erty damage would not exceed $50
000.
Although shocks were reported
day from Helena, Great Falls, B:
ings, Bozeman, Logan, Three For
and Manhattan, none were sevE
enough to cause additional damage
Officials of the great Northern Ra
way tonight said their lines were op
and Chicago, Milwaukee and St. P,
officials announced that their trai
probably would be cleared by Wedn
day, Twenty miles of the Milwau]
main line tracks are still blocked
landslides.

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