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June 28, 1925 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-06-28

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 1925

PRICE FIVE CE

DIRECTORY OF SUMMER STUDENTS
TO BE SOLD ON CAMPUS TUESDAY

PERFECT RECORDS
ATTAINED BY 39g IN
LITERARYCDLLE6E
22 MEN AND 17 WOMEN ARE IN
CLUDED ON ALL "A"
LIST
a JUNIORS LEAD
Semester Records Show List Include
5 Seniors, 11 Juniors, 4 Sopho.
mores, and 9 Freshmen
Thirty-nine students in the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts
received perfect scholastic records
during the last semester, according
to an announcement made by the
registrar"s office yesterday.
The junior class had 11 members
who attained this perfect record, the
freshman class had 9 members in-
cluded in the list, the senior class had
5, and the sophomore class has 4.
Two special students also received
all "A" records. Twenty-two men re-
ceived perfect records scholastically,
while only 17 women are included on
th list.
,Those who received all "A" records
are as follows: Ruth Banfield, '28,
Katherine M. Beierlein ,'28, Kethryn
S. Bennett, '28, Lois W. Berry, '25,
David R. Bishop, '26, William W.
Bishop, Jr., '28, Frances C. Bonner,
'25, Angelyn H. Bouswma, Madeline
Bowers, '27, Thomas R. Boyle, Nancy
Brooks, '28, Hugh B. Carnes, '26, Mary
. Cooley, '26, Roy G. Curtis, '28, Ben-I
jamin A. DGraff, '28, Philip Dow, '27,1
Mrs. E. M. Drake, Spec., Margaret
Effinger, '26, Eunice L. Eichorn, '26,
Adele D. Ewell, '28, Mrs. Bertha Field,
Spec., Austin Fleming, '27, Richard
Freyberg, '26, Jeanette P. Fuller, '26,
Mary E. Hartenberger, '25, Ruth F.
Huber, '25, John E. Hull, '26, Irving
R.' Johnson, Norman B. Johnson, '25,
Thomas H. Mack, '28, Edwin W. Mil-
ler, '26, Samuel J. Nichamin, '26,
Sherwood R. Russell, '27, Ruth V.
Scherer, '26, Norma E. Snell, and
Stephen T. Spaulding.
Dorothy Ketchum
To Address Club
Women on the campus are interest-
ed in vocations open to women. That
social service is peculiarly a woman's
job will be shown by Miss Dorothy
Ketchum, head of the University Hos-
pital Social Service department, at
the meeting of the Women's Educa-
tional club at 7:15 o'clock Monday
at the PI Beta Phi Sorority, 836 Tap-
pan Road. Miss Ruth Price will be
hostess,
All women on the campus includ-
ing graduates and wives of men stud-
ents are cordially invited.,

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SCHIOL ARSHIIP PLANNEDI
FOR STIDENT ATHLETES
A $100 scholarship will be
given at the end of each school
year to the athlete of some maj-
or sport securing the best grades
in the pursuit of his studies, it
was decided at the meeting of
the Board in Control of Athletics
recently.
In order to be eligible for the
scholarship, it was raled, the
man must have won for himself
an "M" in football, basketball,
track, baseball, or tennis. After
an athlete wins the scholarship
for the best grades, he will not
be ineligible for further compe-
tition, it was decided, but may
have a chance to win the $100
a second or third time.

,CHICAGOAN 'MLL T IKTMOHw
Professor Coleman Will Discuss Aims
of Sarvey of 3odern Lang-
iage Teaching
TO SPEAK AT 4 O'CLOCK
Prof. Algernon Coleman of the Un-
iversity of Chicago, representing the
survey of modern language teaching,
in this country, will be at the Uni-
versity tomorrow, and will speak at
4 o'clock in room 200, South Wing,
on the aims and methods of the sur-
vey and of the progress which it has
so far accomplished.
Professor Coleman is in the French
department at the University of Chi-
cago, where he has been since 1913,
being an instructor from 1913 to 1915,
and assistant professor until 1918,
when he was made professor in
French. He wa, a member of the
educational staff ef the Y. M. C. A.
with the A. E. F. in France during
ihe World war, -aid managing editor
of the Modern Language Jour from
1919 to 1922.
His message will be of importance
to all teachers of modern languages
who must co-operate in order to en-
able the survey to accomplish its
purpose.
Tokia, June 27.- The Students'
Musketry society has been organged
by students of the different univer-
sities in Tokio. Its purpose is to im-
prove the physical condition of the
members and to give them training in
rifle shooting.
Athens, June 27.-General Pangalos.
former war minister and one of the
leaders of Thursday's revolution, to-
day definitely assumed the Greek
premiership.

WEEK'S PROGRAM
INCLUDES CONCERT,-
LECTURES OF WIDE GENERAI I-
TEREST OFFERED ON
SCHEDULE
GRIFFITH TO SPEAK
Conference Commissioner of Athletics
and Prof. E. R. Sunderland
Will Appear Tomorrow
Judging from the reception accord-
ed the numbers on the first week's
Summer session progi'am of lectures,
those of the future weeks will pro-
voke equal interest and be equally
well received. The program of the
tpresent week, starting tomorrow at $
o'clock, includes several lectures of
wide general interest, an excursion,
and a concert.
Prof. E. R. Sunderland of the Law
school is the first on the program,
speaking at 5 o'clock tomorrow after-
noo4 on "English Courts." He is fol-
lowed at 8 o'clock in the evening by
athletics of the Western Conference.
Mr. Griffith, the "Judge Landis" of the
Big Ten, is an authority on his sub-
ject, "The Place of Athletics in the
Educational Program."
At Alumni Memorial hall on Tues-
,day at 4 o'clock the faculty of the
Summer session will hold its general
reception. This is the first opportun-
ity for the majority of students to
become acquainted with their instruc-
tors.
A lecture of national interest is to
be given Tuesday night at 8 o'clock,
when Prof. F. W. Kelsey of the Latin
department will sneak on "The Sec-
and American Exedition to the Near
East." Professor Kelscy has ben on
leave, and has just returned from
Asia Minor with the University exped-'
ition, which has been followed on its
tour by the press of the nation. Pro-
fessor Kelsey's talk will be illustrat-
ed.
Wednesday at 1 o'clock the third
excursion will leave for Detroit. There
it will visit the Cass Technical high
school, called the largest and most
complete school of its kind in the
world, and the Hotel Statler. The
first part of the afternoon will be
spent at the school, and the inspec-
tion of the hotel will start at 4 a'-
clock, the trip ending at 5:30.
At 5 o'clock Wednesday Mr. Frank
Tannenbaum of Washington, D. C.,
will talk on "The Meaning of the Mex-
cian Revolution." The second Wed-
nesday night concert by the faculty
of the School of Music will be given
at 8 o'clock in Hill auditorium.
The last two lectures of the week
are scheduled for Thursday. At 5
o'clock "The Making of the Profes-
sional Criminal" will be the subject
of Mr. Tannenbaum. Miss Sally L.
Dean, of New York City, will conlude
the week at 8 o'clock, speaking on
"Child Hygiene."
SCHOOL OF EDUCTION
HOLDS STUDENT MIXER
The School of Education mixer,
which took place Friday evening from
9 to 11:3Q o'clock at the University
High School gymnasium, was attend-
ed by about 500 people. It was an

informal party and , thoroughly en-
joyed by all. The program opened with
the offering of prizes to the girls who
were the tenth to introduce them-
selves to the ten men having the
prizes. This was followed by the
grand march, which, however, was
converted into a game of the "Roman
and English soldiers," which in turn
broke out into a onestep.
The greater part of the remainder
of the evening was devoted to danc-
ing, modern and old-fashioned; in-
cluding the Virginia Reel, and robber
dances for both men and women. At
11:30 o'clock the party was con-
cluded with the singing of the "Yel-
low sand the Blue."
The Department of Agriculture is
attempting to grow a large black
cherry from Eucador in southwestern
United States, where other cherries
will not grow.

MUSIC AND DRAMA

FACULTY CONCERT SERIES'
Interesting programs ror the Facul-
ty Concert series have been arranged
by the University School of Music to
be given all through the summer.
Everyone is invited to attend the con-
certs, which are given at 8 o'clock
Wednesday evenings in Hill auditor-
ium. No admission is charged.
Marian Struble-Freeman, violinist,
accompanied by Mrs. George B. Rhead
and Eunice Northrup, contralto, ac-
companied by Dwight Steere, will,
open the concert series Wednesday
evening.
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, will give a recital on the Co-
lumbian Exposition organ July 8.
James Breakey, guest pianist from-
the Michigan State Normal college,
Ypsilanti will" play July 15. TheI
singer will be announced later.
Max Ewing, guest pianist, will play
July 22. Mr. Ewing, a former student
in the School of Music, has made an
enviable reputation in the East as
concert pianist.
Nell B. Stockwell, pianist, will play1
July 29. The singer will be an-
nounced later.
ARCADE THEATRE .
"Declasse," a First National produc-
tion, starring Corinne Griffith, will

open at the Arcade theatre Sunday.
The story deals with the unhappy
marriage of Lady Helen Haden, and
her love for an American, Ned
Thayer. Thayer has fallen into the
hands of an adventuress and need
forces him to become clay in her
hands. His reformation and Lady
Helen's future happiness are the
basis of the story.
"Declasse" was adapted to the
screen by Charles E. Whitaker and
Bradley King from the stage play
which Ethel Barrymore made famous.
The popular Topics, International
News, and H. C. Whitwer's Pacemak-
ers in "The Merry Kiddo," with an
all star cast of comedians, will com-
prise the program.
"Sundown," which will play Thurs-
day, Friday, and Saturday at tle Ar-
cade pictures the passing of the
pioneer cattle men from the South-
west. This picture raises the ques-
tion in the minds of the American
people as to the future meat supple
of the nation. In the past, the great
I cattle-owners of the West have been
repeatedly forced to seek new graz-
ing lands, due to the apportionment
of small sections of land by the gov-
ernment to homesteaders.
(Continued on Page Three)

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