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August 07, 1925 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-08-07

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]AN DAILY

AL NEWSPAPER OF THE
ERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
every morning except Monday
University Summer Session by
in Control of Student Publica-
ociated Press is exclusively en-
euse for republication of all news
credited to it or not other wise
this paper and the local news pub=
n.

the Ann Arbor,
ond class matter.
by carrier, $i.5o;

Michiean,
by mail,

ffice: Press Building, Maynard Street,
n Arbr, Michigan.'
Comlunications, if signed as evionce of
fod faith, will be published in The Summer
ily at he'discretion o' the Editor. *J
ed communications wil receive no con-
eration. The signature may be omitted in
MicationDifdesired by the writer. The
uouner 'Daily does not necessarily endorse
fesentiments expressed in the communica-
ins.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492
MANAGING EDITOR
NORMAN R. THA.
ews Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
yeditor.........Manning Houseworth
fomens Editor .. ...... .....Marion tread
ight Editor..... ...Le Roy IL. Osborn
ight Editor ......W. Calvin Patte'con
ight Editor .......Chandler Hf. Whipple
Assistants
rilliam T. Barbour George 1. Lehtinen
kian Boron Marion Meyer
ha Ruth Brown 1Ralph B. Nelson
orothy Burris Miriam Schlotterbeck
atherine Lardner Wendall Vreeland
za Stlen Lehtinen
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
JOHN W. CONLIN
rculation.........Kermit K. Kline
nbication..............Frank Schoenfeld
Assistants .
yra C. Finsterwald Nance Solomon
len, lurey Thos. E. Sunderland
Ii
4
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 1925
Night Editor-LeROY L. OSBORN
A FORDIZED WORLD
As a first step toward disposing of
ie great number of ships that were
uilt during the war, and which have
een lying idle since the armistice, the
hipping board has sold 200 of them
> Henry Ford for $1,706,000. Most
f these ships, in all probability, will
e scrapped, but despite the fact that
iousands and thousands of dollars
orth of labor, both in the building
ad scrapping of the ships, will be
st, It is better to lose this part of
ie original investment than to allow
ie ships to lie idle indefinitely,
Arid t e originalobject of the Ship-
ing b rd has not bee entirely de-
ae d, h since FordIs said to have in-
)rmed Chairman O'Connor of the
hipping board that he Will convert
ome of the ships awarded to him
ito Diesel-driven craft to carry his
roducts to foreign shores, and that
e will use the engines and machinery
rom other of the boats in his manu-
icturing plants.
With Ford in the shipping game,
he world can expect the development
f the same highly efficient organiza-
on that has always characterized all
ord undertakings, and this time the
'orld will not laugh and scoff as it
id whin the great business genius
ok over the defunct Detroit, Toledo,
rd Ironton railroad. Ford made a
iccess of that undertaking, despite
e fact that it was entirely by the
se of his own idustries. Ford will
so find a way to build up and prop-
ly conduct a steamship line, on a
inor scale. And if Henry himself
n't able to'do it, he can always hire
eople who can.
She was just a coal miner's daugh-
r, but she liked h r "Strikes." (Not

EDITORIAL COMMENT
FR NTIERS, PEOPLES AND PEACE
(The New York Times)
A forthcoming decision by the Coun
cil of the League of Nations will deal
with letter boxes. The matter appears
somewhat less trivial when it is stated1
that they are Polish letter boxes sit-
uated in the Free City of Danzig and
that it is one more issue involving the,
delicate problem of a port inhabited
by Germans assigned to Poland for
economic reasons. The forecast hasf
it that the Council will decide in fa-
vor of Poland's claim to th'e right of
placing her mail containers all over
the town of Danzig, instead of hav-
ing the term "port" restricted to the
docks.
Those who believe in the League'as ,
an instrumentality for the prevention
of war must not visualize it as oper-
ating only in crises of the first mag-
nitude. No doubt the hopes of a very
large portion of mankind are turned
to the eague in case the storm
clouds ever again darken the Euro-
pean horizon with the furious speed
of the summer of 1914. But a highly
useful work confronts the League in
the minor crises that are continuous-
ly developing, in the perpetual rub-
bings and irritations and festerings
out of which catastrophes ultimately,
emerge. It has been one of the great
outcries against the Treaty of Ver-
sailles that it drew frontiers and dis-'
tributed populations thus and so when
it should have been done thus and so.
Yet the "wrongs" done to Germans in
Poland, to various minorities in Ru-
mania and elsewhere in the remade
Europe, could not have been avoided
without creating another set of
wrongs and discontents. Given the
inextricable tangle of ethnology and
frontiers in Middle and Eastern Eu-
rope, and a definite insurance against
war is never to be found in any def-
inite, "ideal" ,'frontier arrangement.
The real safeguard consists in pre-
cisely such work as the League has
been carrying on-the settlement of
specific controversies as they arise in
the spirit of conciliation and commo
sense, based naturally; on the major
decisions of the Peace Treaty.
How the League functions in this
respect is severally illustrated in a
single day's news budget. German
complaints against Polish "excesses"
in the repatriation of German sub-
jects take on a new aspect when it is
shown that the process is under con-
ditions prescribed by the League of
Nations. Greece, in controversy with
Bulgaria about the security oft Greek
nationals on the frontier, proposes to
appeal to the League of Nations. At
. Williamstown the Rumanian Govern-
ment is charged with oppressing mi-
norities, and inevitably it occurs to
the mind that the protection of mi-
norities is within the scope of the
Lague of Nations. Poland recently
made a radical change in her treat-
ment of her Jewish subjects under the
spur, partly at least, of criticism at
Geneva. Whether it is a job of trans-
ferring populations as was done on
a huge scale between Greece and Tur-
key and as is now being done on a
sniall scale between Poland and Ger-
many; or of protecting populations
that cannot be removed; or of recon-
ciling frontiers with practical neces-
sity and the dictates of justice, it is'
to the League that the task ultimate-
ly falls.
Americans who have been impa..
tient with Europe's physical, political
and spiritual Balkanizations and have
suggested the too easy' remedy that

the peoples of Europe ought to for-
get race, language and frontiers will
sooner or later come to recognize the
immense value of the labors ptr-
formed by the League. It is a League
that does not ask for the impossible,
but works for- peace in Europe with
the European raw materials that it
has in hand. .
THEY CAN'T GIVE MONEY AWAY!
(Collier's)
Americans who are trying to reform
the country's morals, -habits, educa-
tion, politibs or other institutions, or
to sell, a good thing to many people
at a fair price, ought to be heartened,
when the job seems long and slow, by
considering this fact:
A year ago the Veteran's Bureau
drafted every postmaster, recruiting
officer and veteran's welfare organiza-
tion in the United States in a cam-
paign to give away two billion dollars
insurance to four million men. After
a year's work it had the job half done.
Today it is still trying to give away
a billion dollars to two million former
service men and women. Veteran's
Bureau officials say that the main
trouble is reaching the men and wo-
men with the news.'
DneAat Tniov Frfi" Wel-

OAS 1TEDRQ
WE
HAVEN'T ,
NAMED IT YET
,No, we haven't named it, but there
she. are, and she belongs to us, or at
least pretty near, but that's a busi-
ness matter and is out of place here.
The point is that we got to hank-
ering for a bus, until the hanker got
so strong we couldn't resist it any
longer, and so yesterday with the ces-
sation of our classes, away we went
merrily down to look over the auto
marts amid the buzz and bustle of
Ann Arbor business life. First off we
came to an open field whereon -re-
posed many anti-diluvian busses.
"Haw," says we to the guy, by way
of opening the conversation. "Haw,
how are the good old cars today?"
As we said that we stressed the words
right so that he saw the pun right
away and laughed heatily.
"Not so good!" he 'roared, wiping
the tears from his eyes. "Haw, haw
haw. Ain't that a good one?"
"No" said we, and away we Went.
He was too congenial-we would have
bought 'most anything from him.
Then we came to another field. As
we moved onto its confines or some
such thing a group of six men looked
up at us in a surly manner. We aren't
sure just what, a surly manner is, like,
but that must have been it. If we're
any judge of attitude they were talk-
ing over what kind of a blunt weapon
they' would use on us. But we were
steadfast, and finally one of them rose

Bay City, Aug. 6. -- While hoeingj
potatoes on their father's farm four
miles east of the city Tuesday after-
noon, Theodore Van Wert, 17, son of
John Van Wert, was instantly killed
by a bolt of lightning and his sister,
Loretta. 19, and brother Arthur 15,
were both seriously injured.
K 120th TIME
GARRIC MEvae. -50e to $2.50
Wed. Mat.50c to $1.50
14th Big Week Sat. Mat. 50c to $2.00
The Miracle Play of America
ANNE NICHOL$'
" Able's Irish Rose"
SEE IT! You Will Eventually
SEEIT*WHY┬░NOT NOW .
SEATS NOW
For This and Next Week.

Saturday 10-12 A. M.

P1
p..U UEEU EEUP EUUEU.
E i ,

U.
U ,
U.
U
U
Ni
U

CRIPPEN'S DRUG STORES
723 North University Ave.

Ij CHINESE ART COLLECTI

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
BASEMENT

219 South Main St.

217 North

4-6 P. M.

"A STORE IN EVERY SHOPPING DISTRICT"
Our store is convenient to the Campus.

Drop in between classes.

BONSTELLE Mats. Glendale 9,
sday, Thursda
PLAYHOUSE and Saturday. soc-75c.
Woodward at Bliot - Eves. 75c-$I.50
Downtown Ticket office at Grnnell's.
Second Big Week MATNE E
The, Bonstelle Co.
The Most Brilliant of Comedies.
"*GROUNDS
for DIVORCE"
Next week'-"LIGHTNINI "--A record breake
in New York and London.
In the -day A love my bob
Other times-The Covabob!
For evening dress
"THEd OVABOB
S "It Hides the Bob"

NEW CASINO PAVILION
Dancing Every Nig
EXCEPT SUNDAY

NAT N ATOLIlts

ORCH ESTRA ENTERTAINERI
ONE OF THE BEST
This dance pavilion is one;,of the largest an finest in the,
WALLED LAKE, MICHIGAN

,and said:
"Well, what do you want?"
"We were going to look at some of
your cars, mister," says we, "But if
you feel that way about it why I
won't bother you."
"Well, go aheadl and look," says he
and sits down again. Really we are
letting our imagination run away with
us. That wasn't what he said at all,
and he showed us all the pretty cars
and quoted awfully fancy prices, but
It makes a better story that way.
Well, anyhow,- we went from there
to a place which had its ca'rs inside,
and there we chanced upon what we
wanted.
"How much?" says we to the guy
after we- had booted the tires around
a bit.
"Thus and so," says he, rattling the
license plates alluringly.
"Here!" says we, and drove out be-
for he could change his mind.
Well, as we said before, we haven't
named it yet, and we are always open
to suggestions, We hereby start a
contest. The person whose name
meets with our approval before we
have though of one will he given- a
nice ride in the aforementioned char-
iot, and have the pleasure of our com-
pany thrown in as a bonus. The
only rule is ,that we shall be per-
mitted to murder anyone who sug-
gests "Leaping Lena" or kindred
titles. This name must be dignified
and appropriate.
Expedition'Never Mind the Number
Yesterday afternoon after we wrote
this we went out' of town with Bill
c. c. w. w. (congenial companion of
the Woods and waters) to fix up a
boat blind for the duck hunting sea-
son next fall. If all goes well, we
may fish afterward. Cheer up-we'll
bring you, all a nice fishy wishy some
sunny day it it doesn't rain-all of
which is more or less ambiguous, but
don't you care-*p wrote two papers
in rhetoric classes yesterday morning
so what can you expect? Nothing, as
usual. Ha, ha, beat you to it.
Speaking of news on time or ahead'
of time (which we weren't particu-
larly) did you see the nice story in
a prominent Detroit paper about how
the Universiy's nice new hospital
opened last Saturday? It was' a love-
ly story with pictures and everything,
and altogether it covered about-a half
page. The only trouble with the story
was that the hospital didn't open as
per schedule, and so the story beat it-
self to it. Cheer up, though, and read
the story again next week. It is
quite likely that they'll get it open
this time. They'v4 had locksmith's
from all over the state at work, and
now they shave a safe breaker down
from Jackson to do the work, and
pretty soon everything will be Jake.
* * *Mi k
Late wire reports from Micky
show that she is now editing a col-
umn labeled "Micky Says" in alluring
type, and that the' col is running in
the Florida paper cn which she works.
Well, well, Micky a rival at last.

Forty-five Minutes Drive from Ann Arbor

* *.

1
t. x

Stoddard

Hair Shoppe

'707 N. Univ.

Dial 21312

C1*
"The loyalty of my Legions was un-
questioned and now for the first time
I'l bare my ert I pad them, you
A Fine Cane
Oc Everywyere
e tgIsioe n d kt he Wllua-
saa ndya*., Chioago.MZ.. a.". H. Williamson, Prow.

Drop in for a
Toasted Sandwich

Dainty Salad

Hot Coffee

Waffles

Ice Cream Sodas

All kinds of good things to eat or drink.

The :Arbor Fount

"

3 13 S. STATE

}

Vacation &Outing e

TENTS.

All kinds, Wall Tents, Pup Tents; Mosqu
Children's Play Tents. Flies, Canvas Cove
AUTO.TOURO TENTS

WHERE IS THE LEAGUE
ile European. statesmen are try-
o sell the United States the
ue of Nations, news continues to
this country to the effect that
eague has made little, if any,tdif-
ce in the conduct of the national
cal affairs of the continent.
latest reports are to the effect
Greece is buying arms and
gthening her air force in prepa-
for a'ny trouble that may arise
en that country and Bulgaria,
there are further reports that
troops are being moved toward
ulgarian border.
course this friction between
two Balkan countries, and the
ued armament of other Euro-
nations, may be, and probably
. aftermath of the World. war.
evertheless, it . was the under-
purpose and intention of the!
e W preserve world- peace.
League may be a success in the
,-it undoubtedly will if all the
s of importance get behind it,--
will be difficult to convince the
s of the world that they should
whole-heartedly, as long as it

GOLD MEDAL CAMP FURNITURI
For Cottage, Porch, Lawn or Touring-Folding Cots, $3.75. Stools 65c, Tables,
Air Mattresses, Sleeping Bags, Navy Hammocks, Stoves, Grills, Axes, Luggage Racks,
Duffel and Luggage Bags, Folding Buckets, Blankets-in fact, everything for camp
or touring.
BLUE SERGE AND
WHITE DUCK NAVY TROUSER
Khaki, Linen, Palm Beach and Light Weight Trousers. Breeches and Knickers for
ladies and men. Light weight Shirts in Khaki,. Poplin, Broadcloth, Flannels, -etc., ,for
dress or outing wear. Underwear, all kinds for your comfort these warm days.

High Tops and Hip Rubber Boots for the
Fishing Trip
SUEDE JACKETS AND BLOUSES
In Leather, Corduroy, Wool Plaids, etc.

n\

* * *

...

SURPLUS SUPPLIES STORE

And we forgot to say-ve've had
flat tire already.

a

Tamam.

Downtown in Rear of Post Office

213 North 4th Ave.

Dance at Union Jriday ight.

l

now"

mammuu

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