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August 01, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-08-01

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HNUJED COOL
TODAY

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ASSOCIA'J
PRESS

DAY AN !IGHT WIRE
SERVI+CE

No. 37

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1925

PRICE FIVI

.. .-
_-_

TN EXCURSION
LI LEAY TOAY
HON OF PENITENTIARY
WILL START AT 10
O'CLOCK
) VISIT PLANT

Will Be Spent At
Consumers Power
Company

Plant

e eighth excursion party of the
ner session is leaving early this
.ing for Jackson, where the fore-
will. be spent in inspection of
State prison, and the afternoon
he Consumers Power Company
cording to a letter to Carlton
s, director of the excursions, from
Crowley of the recdrger's office
e prison, this will be' the first
that women have been permitted
.spect the prison.
e inspection of the prison is
luled to start at 10 o'clock. The
cell block, an old building of
stories, will be visited first;
the party' will go to the dormi-
section, in which several pris-
occupy one room. They will
visit the recreation grounds,
the dining room. In the dining
, all the dishes are of aluminum,
enough not to be dangerous as
ons.
e six prison industries will be
cted next. The first of these is
nonument shop. Only men with
sentences are trained in this
, since it requires several years
ecome sufficiently expert. Other
stries are the cannery, and the
license factory, the latter being
argest. The prison tour will be
leted by noon, when the party
go to one of the churches for
heon, which is being served them
ie Consumers Power company.
e greater part of the afternoon
be spent in the inspection of the
r company plant. This company,;
hich Jackson is a large distribu-
point, firkiishes most of the
r in the state. A representative
he company, will explain how it
:s, after which all of its plants
be visited. The trip is expected
e over by 3 or 4 o'clock.
omen-' SLeague
Holds Last Tea
tsy Barbour house assisted the
en's League as hostess for the
riven from 4 until 6 o'clock Wed-
ay at that dormitory.
.e affair concluded the series of
homes" given by the League dur-
he summer, which have been pop-
with the women students attend-
the Summer session.
culty guests included Prof. Louis
Carpinski and Mrs. Karpinski,,
. C. O. Davis and Mrs. Davis,
Amy Hobart, and Prof. Mar-
Elliott.
.ss Jeanette Perry, director of
y Barbour house, Lillian Wetzel,
president of the simmer League,
Ruth Whelan informally- re-1

Will Raze Hotel 1
,Where Governors
Met With Lincoln
Altoona, Pa., July 31.-Eff'orts are
being made by local and other histor-
ical -societies to mark appropriately
the spot of the historic old Logan
House, which will be razed to make
way for a new railroadl stationl It
was in a room in the Logan House
that the Union war ;governors, in.
September, 1862, met with President
Lincoln and pledged to him their faith
and support.
The meeting was informal and pri-
vate, no written record of any kind
was kept, and newspaper reportern.
were not present. It was called to
take measures for more active sup-
port of the government and resulted
in the pledge to Lincoln and the Un-
ion. M The pledge was signed by 13
governors and endorsed by a number.
of others not at the conference.
Among the singers were A. G. Cur-
tin, Pennsylvania; John A. Andrew,
Massachusetts; Richard Yates, Illin-
4s; Israel Washburn, Jr,. Maine; Sam-
uel J. Kirkwood, Iowa; William Spra-
gue, Rhode Island; F. H. Pierpont,
Virginia; David Todd, Ohio; N. S.'
Berry, New Hampshire, and Austin
Blair, Michigan.
BILY DISCUSSES
Talks an Necessity of Electricity
And Progress in The
Field

Where Navy Will Build Great Pacific Air Base

, The navy department is preparing to move its dirigible base from Lakehurst, N. J., to San Diego, Cal.,
where an airport will be constructed at a cost of many millions of dollars. The photo shows the city from
the air. Inset, the U. S. S. Shenandoah, one f Uncle Sam's two largest dirigibles which with the U. S. S. Los

Angeles, will, be at home at San Diego in the future.

I

SHOWS EDISO FILMS
"If it 'were possible for me to shoy7
you in one hour a movie film of the
history of the world's progress," said
Prof. B. F. Baily, of the engineering
cgllege in an illustrated lecture on
"Our Electrified World" given in Na-'
tural Science auditorium at 5 o'-
clock yesterday afternoon "the first 59
minutes and 40 seconds would have to
deal with the world before the age of
electrical invention. The last 20 sec-
onds would be left for electrical pro-f
gI'ess." r
Professor Baily spoke on the ne-
cessity of electricity in the present
day, and the rapid progress that has
been achieved in the electrical field.
A filmwas shown featuring the life
and inventions of Thomas Edison,
from newsboy, early experimenter,
and telegraph operator to inventor.
HAWA1IN HORSES "WILL
INVADE EA4STERN TURF
Honolulu, July 31.- Eastern race
tracks will see several Hawaiian
horses in action this fall, according
to C. A. Hartwell, former island resi-
dent, who visited the islands recent-
ly, and who now' operates a farm at
Pleasanton, Calif.
According to Hartwell, horses from
his stable have made . impressive
showings in coast races during the
past year, and it is the conviction of
many who have seen them in action
that they will repeat on eastern
courses.
Many of the horses are from the
famous Parker ranch stallion. War
Shot, the pride of the 500,000 acre
stock ranch on the island o1 Hawaii.
Race enthusiastis and followers
will be hearing new names for horses
appearing at the barrier, when the
Hawaiian steeds make their appear-
ance. Such names as Keala, Kilauea,
Poni Moi, Mokihana, Kauila, Kail-
olani, and Lunalilo, have been given
to the thoroughbreds.
Paris, July 31.-Intensification of
the French government's campaign
against Communists is indicated by
formal charges lodged against Jac-
ques Doriot, Communist deputy, for
inciting French soldiers in Morocco to
mutiny.
Mexico City, July 31.-By a new fi-
nancial arrangement soon to be com-
pleted, the debts of the Mexico City
railways and the "Caja de Prestam-
os" (loan bank) will probably be re-
deemed.

STRIKE OF BRITISH
MINERS AVERTED'
Mine Owners Enabled to Continue
Existing Agreements Through
Action of Premier
--.-'f
GOVERNMENT YIELDS
(By The Associated Press)
London, Eng., July 31.-The gan-
eral strike of British coal miners
which, had been scheduled to start at
12 o'clock tonight has been called off.
What bade fair to be one of the
worst industrial stoppages in modern
times was averted when Premier
Stanley Baldwin today promised: "sub-
vention," to the mines, thereby en-
abling the owner sto continue their
existing wage agreements for another
nine months.
Although the government previous-
ly had maintained to the workers that
it was not prepared to subsidize the
mining industrry,'Mr. Baldwin finally
yielded to the threat of an industrial
nightmare situation involving a gen-
eral stoppage in the coal industry,
possibly a general cessation of rail-
road operations and consequently the
shutting dowh of other industries for
lack of coal.
SROOKHARHT LOSESVOTES
TOSTECK-IN RCOUNT-
Washington, D. C., July 31.- The
apparent gain of 882 votes for Daniel,
L. Steck, Democrat, in the Iowa sen-
atorial recount was conceded today'
by supervisors for Sen. Smith W.'
Brookhart, but they insisted that this
would be reduced to a net gain of 72
by offsetting ballots challenged by the
opposing sides.
,Votes for Andy Gump and Barney
Google were found today in the re-
count which is being conducted un-
der supervision of a Senate commit-
tee.
Club Banquet Is
Set For Tonight
The unusual success of the ban-
quet of the Cosmopolitan club last
Saturday at 1016 Olivia street has in-
duced the club to make plans for an-
other banquet from 8 to 10 o'clock
tonight at the Helen Newberry resid-
ence.
Refreshments will be served and
there will be games, music and songs
of different countries.

Aviation FieldI
Is Naned After
Flier Who Fell
Williams, Ariz., July 31.-The name
of a young army aviator who sacri-
ficed his life to the cause of flying
has been given to an aviation field
here which, with the development of
transcontinental mail and commercial
air lines, may become one or an im-
portant chain of landing places. .
I, is Webber field. Lieut. Charles
L. Webber was killed Dec. 7, 1922, atc
the age of 26. He was piloting Col-t
onel Francis C. Marshall of the avia-
tion service from Rockwell field, Sann
Diego, Cal., to Fort Huachuca, Ariz.,1
and both officers lost their lives. It isI
believed that the plane crashed into u
a peak of the Santa Rita mountain
iange. For days all the air forces
of the Southwest together with infan- c
try and cavalry troops, searched forX
the missing officers. After two weeksI
the destroyed plane was found..'
SPONSORS OF EVOLUTION ;
SUIT P REDICT REVIVL
Washington, July 31.-Washington's1
evolution suit, started with a shout,,
has died in a whisper, but its spon-
sors assert it will shortly be revived
on a. firmer )asis.
Withdrawn yesterday on the eve of,
the date set for argument on the Gov-
ernment's motion to dismiss the suit,
attorneys for Loren H. Wittner, the
Government clerk who filed it, an-
nounced that in taking this action,;
they planned to file another suit de-
signed to survive objections raised
against the complaint as first drawn.'
To strengthen his case, Wittner said
he not only would file his next suit.
as a taxpafer in the District of Col-
umbia instead of a Federal taxpayer,
but also would seek to have a local
taxpayer with children attending pub-
lic schools here, join as co-plaintiff in
the action.
In drawing up his new bill, Witt-1
ner, who, as an avowed atheist,
brought his suit to test the _"disre-
spect" clause of the appropriation bill
'in the interest of free teaching of sci-
entific subjects, is being assisted by
c the Rev. R. M' .Lawson, pastor of
the Maryland Avenue Baptist Church.
Mr. Lawson,. who is a former New
York attorney, explained he was lend-
ing his advice in the case in the in-
terest of "complete separation of
church and state."
Panama, July 31.- Gen. Leondias
Plaza, former president of Ecuador
who has been banished from his
country, has sailed for the United
States.q

STATE WILL SET
PROPERTY VALUE

LAST ITES SioD
OVER BODY1OFTHE
6REAT COMMONER
QUIET FUNERAL MARKS END OF
BRAYAN'S LAST
JOURNEY
"TAPS" ARE PLAYED
Handful of Friends Watch as Casket
Is Lowered Into The
Earth
(By The Associated Press)
Washington, D. C., July 31.-Be?
,neath a peaceful grass grown hillsidle
William Jennings Bryan' lies tonight
to sleep calm away.
No,-special guard keeps watch be-
side his grave. Only the quiet beat
ftrpers on their regular, patrol
of the great field of the fallen re-
sound above the commoner's burial
plot.
He is in the keeping of the God
and of the nation to whose service
his life was given.
The last journey of the commoner
from Tennessee where he fell aslee'p,
ended under an army tent spread to
shelter his grave from the driving
rain that had fallen since morning,
to cease only a moment before the
funeral party arrived at the ceme-
tery. Within 4, there. was room
" only for the casket wrapped about
with the glowing colors of the flag
the dead man had served in peace and
war, and a handful of the many
friends of his three decades of stir-
ring life.
Those ministers otf the gospel who
said above him the rites for the dead
and who a little time before had given
him the last benediction of the church,
alone saw the casket sink slowly down
into the earth as the soft calling of
an army bugle lulled the sleeper to
his long repose with the tender notes
of "taps," the soldier requiem.
TAYOR PORTRIT TO
BE IRECEIVED TOINGH
The portrait of Prof. Fred M. Tay-
lor, head of the, economics depart-
ment will be: presented to the Uni- ;
versity tonight at a banquethto be
given at the Michigan Union. It will
be presented by a group of Professor
Taylor's colleagues, and will be re-
ceived for the University by Regent
Junius E. Beal. The portrait isthe
work of A. M. Valerio, an Italian
painter residing in Ypsilanti.
" A large number of guests, among
whom are past colleages and ad-
vanced students of Professor Taylor
as well as his associates, are expected
to attend.
LEWNIS ARSKS CHfANGE IN
MA-P OF COMMITTEE1
Atlantic City, N. Y., July 31.-John
L. Lewis, president of the United
Mine Workers of America, served
notice tonight that attempts to ne-
gotiate the new contract necessary In
the hard coal fields one month from
today cannot well continue without
the immediate presence at the joint
conference here of Samuel E. Warri-

ner, chairman of the anthracite op-
erators conference, and William J.
Richards, another veteran operator.
This brought a reply from Mr. War-
riner that there would be no change
in the make up of the operator's com-
mittee.

Tax Comumission Expected To
Evaluation of Real Prop.
erty Monday.

Make

OVER SEVEN MILLION
(By The Associated Press)
Lansing, July 31.-The state tax
commission will set a tentative valua-
tion on the real property in Michigan
next Monday. Indications today were
It will exceed the seven billion dol-
lar mark. The present equalized val-
uation is $7,007,917,000.
The tentative values set by the
commission will be subject to review
by the state board of equalization.
An equalized value, which may lie
lower than the figure recommended
by the commission, will be fixed the
latter part of August. In 1924 the
board of equalization accepted the tax
commission's recommendation without
a protest..*
The counties will have an oppor-
tunity to protest the valuations rec-
ommended by the tax commission
when the board of equalization meets
Aug. 17.
As is the case every year, it is ex-
pected many will send representatives
to protest the valuations.
The tentative figures Monday and
the equalized valuation to be fixed
later by the board of equalization will
include not only a total for the state,
but the apportionment among the
counties. The proportion of valua-
tion borne by any county will deter-
mine the proportion of the estate tax
that county must stand.
In 1924 the board of equalization,
in accepting the tax commission's
figures, gave Wayne county a boost
of about half a billion dollars in val-
uation and an increase of about five
per cent in the amount of state tax
it was required to pay. On the other
hand, most agricultural and out-
state counties, except those largely
iidustrial, were given decreases. The
situation led to a strenuous protest
from Detroit.
Baseball Scores
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Cleveland 2, Boston 7.
Others-rain..

TN DAOTA, OPENS'
UAR ON HIGH, GASOLINE,
erre, S. D., July 31.-South Dako-
"war" against high gasoline
s opened today with state own-
Illing stations in at least ' three
s retailing motor fuel at 'from
to four cents less a gallon than
price charged by privately owned
panies.
Mitchell, Watertown, and Aber-
the state opened its campaign
>ree the Standard Oil company of-
ma and independents 'to lower
-prices to what the highway
nission' considers an equitable
bclholm, July 31.-The Swedish
rnment has followed the lead of
r European states in refusing the
rican demand for diplomatic ree-"

WIIATS GOING ON

SATURDAY
S:47 a. n.-Excursion No 8 will leave
for Jackson - at downtown interur-
ban station.
8:00- Cosmopolitan club social at
Helen Newberry residence.
- SUNDAY
6:30- Wesleyan guild discussion at
Wesley hall. Subject, "The Place
of the Bible in the Public School
System,"

NATI1NAL LEAGUE
New York 4, Chicago 3.
Cincinnati 4, Boston 3.
Brooklyn 9, St. Louis 4.
Philadelphia-Pittsburg, rain.

4,

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