100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 15, 1924 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG9 FOUR

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1924

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the Office of the Summer Ses-
sion until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday).
Volume 4 TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1924 Number 201
Students of Biology:
Dr. Charles W. §tiles, of the Hygiene Laboratories of the United States
Public Health Service, Washington, D. C., will conduct round table discus-
sions on the International Rules of Zoological Nomenclature on Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday, July 15, 16, and 17, at 11 o'clock in room 24?
Natural Science Building. A. F. SHULL.
Students of Public Health:
Dr. C. W. Stiles of the United States Public Health Service will lec-
ture daily, Monday, July 14 to Thursday, July.17, inclusive, at 4 p. m.
in the auditorium of the Natural Science Building. Dr. Stiles will speak
upon the following subjects: "The Public Health Aspects of Race Prob-
lems, Soil Pollution, The Sanitary Privy, and Hookworn Disease.
JOHN SUNDWALL.
Women Interested in Education:
A tea given in honor of Miss Stine and Miss Gratton, who are on the
faculty for the summer, will be held at Adelia Cheever house this after-
noon, Tuesday, July 15, at 4 o'clock.
COMMITTEE.
Men's Educational Club:
There will be a meeting of the Men's Educational Club this evening in
room 318 of the Michigan Union, at 7 o'clock. Coach Little will discuss
the problem of the relation of the s chool administrator to athletics.
COMMITTEE OF OFFICERS.
Dean Effinger's Office Hours:
I shall be in my office each morn ing from 10 to 12 for the remainder
of this week for consultation. I expect to leave Ann Arbor early next

Fresh Air Camp Provides Real
Instruction For Poor Boys

"Gee! This is the life!" "I neverj
seen so many trees!" "Them aint'
real boats?" These are typical ex-
pressions that might be heard by any
visitor at the University of Michigan
Fresh Air camp.
Supported by alumni and students
of the University, and due to the un-
tiring efforts of a committee working
under the direction of L. C. Reimann,
'16, over a thousand boys sent from
the probate courts, and detention
homes of Detroit and surrounding cit-
ies, have been given a ten day intro-
duction into the wonders of nature,
the fellowship of the camp fire, and
the association with University men,
since the founding of the camp in
1921.
Th edaily routine starts 6:30 a. m.
After the flag has been raised, the
boys go through calisthenic exercises,
which are followed by a plunge in the1
lake. Breakfast is at 7:30 after which
work is assigned to all tents till the
calling of classes at 9 o'clock.
The boys are given real instruction
in nature study, woodcraft, and scout-
ing by competent men. Nature study
classes are conducted under the per-
sonal direction of E. M. Lockwood,
well known ornithologist and entim-
ologist, of Tecumseh, who has been
with the camp every summer since its
founding. Bird identification classes
are held in the woods which abound
with feathered folk; butterfly and bug'
hunts are included in the day's pro-
fgram. The results of these expedi-
tions are carefully explained to the
boys, both from a biological and econ-
omic stand point by Mr. Lockwood. It
is through such studies as these that
make the Fresh Air camp unique
among its kind.
At 11 o'clock, the boys have a half
hour swimming period, followed by
a strict personal inspection just be-
fore dinner. The afternoon is devoted
to athletics, boating and fishing. Base-
ball leagues are organized and cham-
pionship races are developed. Volley
ball games, track meets and horseshoe
pitching are other prominent sports.
Throughout all contests, a spirit of
clean play and sportsmanshiv is de-
t veloped, and the spirit into e*Tch the
boys enter into these contests after a
few days of contact with the ideals
of the camp, is a tribute to those
men who give their time and money
because they believe in boys, both as
boys and as future citizens.
A rigid tent inspection is held just
before supper, the winning tent re-

ceiving a Michigan banner for the fol-
lowing day. After supper a camp fire
is held in a natural amphitheater at
which songs and Michigan cheers are
given, and once in a while, in fact all
too seldom, faculty men are able to
come out to the camp and introduce
to the kids new worlds which in
their wildest imaginations they could
never have penetrated. The day ends
with the sounding of taps at 9 o'-
clock.
The situation of the camp is in as
ideal a location as could be found
anywhere in the state. Surrounded
on three sides by lakes, it stands on a
high bluff from which many miles
of the country side may be seen. In
early times it was the home of a
tribe of Pottawanimy Indians, and
perhaps the most interesting part of
the thick woods that extend for
mile back of the camp, is the remains
of an Indian council ring. A per-
fect circle roughly about, forty feet
in diameter, can be seen enclosing
a low mound of earth, in the middle
of which once burned the tribal camp
fire. Although no real excavation has
been done on this mound, a hasty ex-

amination has revealed fragments of
charcoal in its center. Manyarrow
heads and a tomahawk have been!
found in the immediate neighborhood
of the camp.
Leaders for the camp have been re-
cruited from students of the Univer-
sity who give their services to the
cause of the boys. Leaders are need-
ed for the remainder of the camp,
which closes Aug. 14, and anyone in-
terested is asked to call at Lane
hall.
The camp is situated 20 miles west
of Ann Arbor, near Pickney, and Mr.
Reimann, the director, issues a cord-
ial invitation to all persons desirous
of visiting it.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
11:00-Round Table discussion-The
International Rules of Zoological
Nomenclature. Dr. C. W. Stiles.
Room 242, Natural Science building.
4:00-Soil Pollution.. Dr. C. W. Stiles.
Natural Science auditorium.
5:00-The Current Tendencies in the
Teaching of Mathematics. Prof. W.
B. Ford, Natural Science auditor-
ium.

7:00-Choral Union rehearsal. School
of Music.
S :00-lecture-Herlth EwnMIustous.
Dean John M. Dotson, gditor of
Hygiene, Chicago. Natural Science
auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
11:00- Round Tabile discussion -
(Continued.)
1:00-Excursion No. 7.-Ford's River
..Rouge blast furnace, Foundry, body,
and tractor plants, southwest of
Detroit. Meet at Packard and State
streets at 1:00 p. m. Trip ends at
5 p. m.
4:00--The Sanitary Privy-Dr. C. W.
Stiles, Natural Science auditorium.
5:00-Theory of Quanta-Prof. V. F.
Colby. Natural Science auditorium.
:00-C oncert-Mr. Anthony J. Whit
mire, violin; Miss Nell B. Stock-
well, piano, under the auspices of
the University School of Music, Hill
auditorium.
THURSDAY
11:00-= Round Table discussion. -~
(Continued.)
4:00-Hookworm Disease-Dr. C. W.
Stiles. Natural Science auditorium.
5:00-The Development in American
Transportation. (Illustrated.) Prof.
H. E. Riggs, Natural Science audi-
torium.

"

Book Bargains

50c Each

week for my vacation.

JOHN R. EFFINGER.

TEN STUDENTSM E TRIPI
THROUGH DETROIT PLANTS
Burroughs Adding Machine Com-,
pany and the General Motors building
were inspected by a group of ten
University students Saturday. At the
Burroughs plant types of adding,
billing, calculating, and bookkeeping
machine were demonstrated by ex-
perts. Methods of manufacture and
sales, and training school procedure
for salesmen, were explained to thel
visitors, following which luncheon
was served in the officers' dining
room.
Special guides conducted the party
from roof to sub-basement of the huge
General Motors Office Building, the
largest of its kind in the world. Par-
ticularly interesting were the cafet-
eria, gymnasium, rest rooms, indoor
golf school, and similar equipment for
the welfare of the workers in the
building. The trip ended- at two fif-
teen.

TOURNEY SECOND ROUND
TO START WEDNESDAY
All results of the first round in
the campus tennis tournament must
be reported to George J. Moe by 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon, it was an-
nounced today. Matches which have
not been played and reported at that
time will be declared forfeited.
The second round of the tournament
will be sarted Wednesday, unless
weather conditions make delay nec-
essary.
Washington, July 14.-President and
Mrs. Coolidge with their son and
guests rested on the Mayflower as it
cruised down the Potomac Sunday.
The Pennsylvania hospital, in Phil-
adelphia, operates under a charter
originally granted to it by George II
of England in 1751.
Watch Page Three for real values.

DON'T FAIL TO LOOK OVER OUR
Bargain Counter of All Kinds of Books

50c Each
WA HR'S

NEW ADDITIONS DAILY
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

4

11

""""'

'f

IRVING WARMOLIS, 0. S. C.
Chiropodist and
Orthopestid
707 N. University. Phone 2662
Subscribe for The Summer Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.
FOR BETTER
SUMMER FOOD
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
338 Maynard ,St. South of Maj

r r
a r
r w
r a
r w1
r a
r a
r a
ra
Ner rgho
r G~s
Ever Nit (exept onda) an Al

-1

iC'JJ~J./././'1.."'.1.J."../ .1.I."/%"/1./"d1.'1/1,1./._..~._°'1.I/1.../"/ .11J' 1..1 1IJ'* w./eeJ././

A /w/ / I / r/~~~a /~//~/~~%/a/./~/~d~~~~~i/~/fai/./ii~w/~~~~i/ii/~~~~~~~ /r/1~~ /

tiTU DENTS
A T I S F A C T I O N
1 1 1 1 S O U T H
- , i

SUPPLY
E R V I C E
U N I V E R S I T Y

5T0 RE3
A V I N 0
AV 6 _NU E_

m

6 ,.. " G6+- .. Pi 1 fir: ,eat'

0

WOMMIXclr

ar

0P

.000

W.

.iirrr., .rr, .r

.I

--

GROOMES' BATHING BEACH
Whitmore Lake
Refreshments 01 All Kinds
Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

Daily Excursion to
PUT-IN-BAY

80C w

Me Round Trip $1.2
Vay (Return Same Day)
Leaves Detroit Daily 9 a. m. (E. T.)

5 Sundays
Holidays

The finest exclusive excursion steamer, the Put-in-Bay, noted for
its large ballroom, makes this trip a memorable one. Orchestra and
dancing aboard, without extra charge. Cafeteria aboard.
Four hours crammed with outdoor pleasures at Put-in-Bay-bathing-dancing-
groves for lunching and athletic fields. See the wonderful Caves, and Perry's
hisoric monument.
Connections at Put-in-Bay with steamers for Cleveland. Toledo and Lakeside.
Daily to Sandusky
The Put-in-Bay goes to Sandusky every day. Fare-$1.50 one way.
Special Friday Excursions to Cedar Point
(After July 4th)
A special excursion is made every Friday to Cedar Point-the fresh water rival
to Atlantic City-the finest bathing beach in the world-large summer hotels,
groves, and all outdoor amusements. Four hours at Cedar Point and seven
hours at Put-in-Bay! Leaving Cedar Point at 5 p. m. and Put-in-Bay at 7 p. m.;
arrive back in Detroit 10:30 p. m. Fare--Cedar Point, $1.75 round trip; Put-in-
Bay, 80 cents.
._._.- . e Write for Map Folder

Today is your last
chance to pay your
Daisy subscription
for $1.50
TOMORROW IT ADVANCES TO $2
Pay this afternoon
at the table in front
of the general libra-
ry or come to the
Press building on
Maynard street at
any time
THE SUMMER
MICHIGAN DAILY

U-
'II!
/&
gL4
~1
til
r9
0
9
D
I
9
('I
p
9

Choice o a Career
From the Yale News
THE NINETY-FOUR
Someone, probably an insurance
agent, was quoted recently as saying
that from the mass of one hundred
college graduates one individual only
rose to the Polo and butler class, peril-
ously near the top of the financial lad-
der. Five others became comfortably
off and found themselves after twenty
years at the small yacht and chauffeur
stage. The other ninety-four presum-
ably congregate in the great section of
the American people who drive their
own Buicks to the golf club. In other
words, dreaming about being a rich
man is one thing, and making the grade
is "something else again."
Yet the ninety-four presumably work
just as hard as the sumptuous six. Their
business is the axis on which a small
and uninteresting world revolves. They
have become devotees of the dollar
and when that fickle deity deserts, have
nowhere else to turn. Jammed in a
dull, straight rut of business they can
never leave the road and jump the fence
into finer fields of life. This, then, is
the portion of ninety-four men out of
every hundred now on the campus.
The answer to the problem lies in
the proper choice of a career.
Between now and Commencement we
shall have something to offer on the
subject of "Careers." Watch for thespace
with the Famous Signature.
LIE NS RN C MCOAN
OF BOSTON. AHSAC"US:TTO
Sixtcyon years in business. Now insuring One Billion Sewn Hunr d
Minlion dollars in piolicies onl 3,250%000 fives.

,

I

I

I

I

i _. ®1s er . T~1 ws ' t. \.r ,ry _ N

a

I -u -nfl-w--- I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan