100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 12, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

(9tr

Oummwr

THE WEATHER
COOLER
TODAY

4kw Ar
fRtr t an

AOF
,A -A --
t

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 19

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

CUMMING LfCTURES
ON INTERNATIONAL
PUBLIC HEALTH
HEAD OF UNITED STATES PUBLIC
HEALTH SERVICE COMIIPL-
MENTS UNIVERSITY
INTERNATIONAL EFFORT
SPENT ON QUARANTINES
Has Established Permanent Office
In Paris To Deseninate
Intelligence
"To paraphrase Lincoln's state-
ment, 'The world can not remain half-
epidemic disease ridden and half
free from disease' ", said Surgeon
General Hugh, S. Cummig in his
lecture on "Public Health from an
International Standpoint" delivered
at 8:00 o'clock at Natural Science
Auditorium last night. Dr. Cummings
speaks with authority and from ex-
perience as he is the Head of the
United States Public Health Service,
the largest official health agency in
the country.
After paying tribute to the pioneer
work which the University of Michi-
gan is doing along tre line of pre-
ventive medicine, Dr. Cummings pro-
ceeded to outline the international
efforts in similar directions.
'Until recent years", he said, "in-
ternational effort has been almost
entirely directed towards making uni-
form and efficient quarantine regul-
ations and towards inducing countries
to remove useless, expensive, and bur-
densome restrictions upon com-
merce."
Tse Conventions of Vence,Paris,
and Rome in the nineties were results
of such effort, the latter resulting in
the establishment in Paris of a per-
manent office with a staff to collect
and desemminate epidemiological in-
telligence, and of the permanent Com-
mittee composed of one representative
from each of the powers signatory to
the Convention. "But", said Dr. Cum-
mings, "in these international con-
ferences there is almost always sharp
line-up of those powers who control
large maritime interests against those
who have little shipping. It is diffi-
cult to reconcile the conflicting iner-
ests for few countries have identical
interests and conditions, and, frank-
ly, few live up to the agreements."
The greatest distinct menace to the
civilized world until recently has
been the Mohammedan pilgrimages to
the Holy Cities when pilgrims from
plague and cholera epidemic centers
of India and the Far East carried
these diseases to the Arabian Shrines
whence infected pilgrims from Russia,
Turkey and the Mediterranean return-
ed to their native lands. These con-
ditions led to the control of the Red
Sea, Egyptian and Turkish maritime
quarantine stations by an internation-
al sanitary board which has undoubt-
edly saved Europe and ourselves from
many serious outbreaks of epidemic
of cholera.
The lecture was conJuded with an
account of the spread of disease dur-
ing the late war and the work of the
League of Red Cross Societies organ-
ized at that time, and that of the
Rockefeller International Board.
St. Louis, July 11.-Declaring that
Senator Robert M. LaFollette iand
Gov. Charles W. Bryan "would carry
every state west of Pennsylvania and
north of the Mason and Divon line,

with several southern states," Sheri-
dan Carlisle, president of the National
Progressive league, telegraphed Sen-
ator LaFollette, urging Bryan as a
running mate.

BRANEIS WANhL AS
MATl FOR LAFOLLTTE

Davidson, Disciple Of Carlyle
And Ibsen, Outstanding Poet

WILL GE ILLUST [TED
TRANSPORTTIN TA

The philosophy of John Davidson
was the subject of an address de
livered at the Natural Science auditor-
ium yesterday afternoon by Prof. R.
M. Wenley of the philosophy depart-
ment.
Davidson, although little known,
was one of the greatest poets of the
nineteenth century, Mr. Wenley declar-
ed. He was the English speaking
representative of the third group of
romanticists, which includes Nietz-
sche and D'Annunzio, and which be-;
lieves in the supremacy of the indivi-
dual over the convention of society.
Prof. Wenley traced the develop-
ment of the romantic movement In
philosophy in literature from the ap-
pearance of Goethe's "Werther"
through the three schools which fol-
lowed it. In the first group, which
sought to escape as individuals from
the conventions of society, are found
such names as Byron and De Musser.
A second group appeared to oppose!

these with the so-called "stand fast"
theory. In this group, by far the
largest and most prominent, such fig-
ures as Herder, Schelling, Hugo, Car-
lyle, 'Emerson, and Newman stand
I out. More recently the third school,
the so-called Neo-romanticists or
I Pragmatists, tend to revert to the
theories of the first, but with the dif-
ference that they lead an active at-
tack upon conservatism and society.
It is in this group that Neitzsche,
Davidson and D'Annunzio belong.
Neo-romanticism sees man, himself
a god, not as made in the image of the
Christian God, but worshipping a god
made in the image of all that is best
in man. Prof. Wenley illustrated the
theories of Davidson by selections
from his verse.
Davidson was strongly influenced by
Ibsen and Carlyle, but notwithstand-
ing the similarity in thought, Nietz-
sche does not appear to have been a
force of any consequence in the mould-
m ing of his thought.

Prof. H. E. Riggs
who will lecture on "The Develop-
ment in American Transportation,"
Thursday evening at 5 o'clock, in Na-
tural Science auditorium. The lec-

Louis D. Brandeis, associate justice
of the United States supreme court, is
being strongly urged as a running
mate for Robert M. LaFollette.

POLITICA [SCHOOL
TO OPEN JULY 2

1

Dean E. H. Kraus To Welcome Stu-
dents At Opening Luncheon
Monday
PROMINENT PROFESSORS
WILL CONDUCT COURSES
An opportunity for intensive study
of politics, legislation and internation-
al relations will be given to women
during the meetings of the Institute
of Politics whict will be conducted
July 21 to 26 under the direction of
the National League of Women voters.
Six courses will be offered to the
students registered in the school.
The work includes a study of State and
,ounty administration, Political par-
ties and nominating methods, Law-
making bodies, legislation and social
progress, international relations and
the popular methods of teaching gov-
ernment. Members of the Detroit
Bureau of governmental research and
several prominent University pro-
fessors including Prof. T. H. Reed of
the political science department; Prof.
A. E. Wood, of the sociology depart-
ment and Prof. J. R. Hayden, of the
political science department will con-
duct courses. Dean Maxime Kalaw,
of the University of the Phillipines
will also deliver a lecture before the
members of the school.
All of the courses will meet in the
auditorium of the new University high
school. A fee of $8 is required for
the entire series of lectures and round
table discussions. This fee will be
payable upon registration at Barbour
gymnasium from 10 to 12 o'clock
Monday, July 21.
The Institute will open with a lun-
cheon at 12:15 o'clock Monday, July
21, in the Union. Dean Edward H.
Kraus, of the summer session, and
Mrs. Craig Miller, of Marshall, Michi-
gan, who is president of the Michigan
League of Women voters, will wel-
come the students.
All women who are interested in the
institute are invited to attend the lun-
cheon. Reservations may be made in
advance by calling Mrs. L. M. Warfield
phone, 1842-J.
PARTY VIITING ADING
MACHINE FACTRYTODAY
The party taking the sixth excursion
of the summer left for Detroit on the
D. U. R. this morning at 8 o'clock with
the Burroughs Adding Machine Com-
pany and the General Motors Building
as its objectives. The morning will be
spent at the adding machine plant and
the party will also lunch at the plant
as guests of the company.
In the afternoon the General Mot-
ors Building, the largest office build-
ing in the world, will be visited.
Special guides will conduct the tour
through this building. The excursion
will be ended by 3 o'clock,

PLAY PRODUCTIONS TO
PRESENT TWO COMEDIES
Classes in play presentation, play
direction, aid stagecraft will present
two three-act plays, Aug. 7 and 8, atf
University Hall udider the direction
of Earl Emery Fleischman. These
plays are "American Comedies by Am-
ericans.'
"Yo uand I," by Philip Barry, the
Harvard prize play of 1922, is charac-E
terized by brilliant dialogue, while
the inimitable Tarkington's "Inti-
mate Strangers" is refreshing in its
keen observations of the modern and3
old-fashioned girl.
A fund, established by gate receipts
of former play productions, finances
the enterprise. Committees have al-j
ready been chosen, parts assigned,
and rehearsals started. Each student
has an active part in the presenta-
tion of some play.
Production is supervised by a
staff of instructors and assistants
composed of Prof. R. Clarence Hunt-
er Earl Emery Fleischman, Henry
Lee Ewbank, and Harry Graves Mil-
ler.
Tickets may be secured now
through the ticket committee : Lu-
cille Conrad, Florence McComb, Len-
or4 Oliver, and Lella Messinger. Aft-
er' Aug. 1, tickets will be available at
the State street bookstores.
ROYAL SOCIETY INVITES
COOPERA4TION OF SCHOOL
The Royal Institute of British Arch-
itects has invited the College of Arch-
itecture of the University to partici-
pate in the first International Con-
gress on Architectural education
which will be held July 28 to August
2 in London.
The architectural school is sending
a collection of its student work to the
exhibition which will be held in con
nection with the Congress. The
Michigan exhibition is made up of
work in architectural design, building
construction, freehand drawing draw-
ing, water color painting, decorative
design an4 modeling.
PRESTON 124E, INJURED
WHEN TRAIN HITS AUTO

TO SELL SEATS MONDAY
FORSHAEPAEPLAYS
Reserved seat tickets go on sale be-
gining Monday at Wahr's bookstore
fo the performance of the Shakes-
peare Playhouse company of New
York city which will play here begin-
ning July 18. Reserved seat tickets
will be 75 cents for single admission
and $2.50 for the series of four plays,
making the price of a ticket for the
entire time much less than the price
of four single admissions.'~
The players are brought here under
the auspices of the English depart-
ment, and members of the department
speak very highly of the quality of
work presented. Prof. Morris Tilley1
says, "These players are highly com-
mendable. It is a remarkable chance1
for Ann Arbor audiences to see acting1
of this caliber." This company has
played here for-the last two summers,
and interest in their arrival is appar-I
ent. Press reports from other cities
have been of the highest type, and
point to some good performances next
week.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE HOLDS
TEA AT CHEEVER HOUSE
Adelia Cheever House was opened
to University women yesterday when
the Women's League held a tea there.
Mrs. T. S. Holen, house director, and
Mrs. Edwin C. Goddard, who is a mem-
ber of the-board of governors, assist-
ed in receiving the guests. More than
50 women attended during the after-
noon. -
Violin and piano duets were played
for the guests by Lucille Bellamy, '25,
and Helen Van Blois.
Several League parties are planned
to follow the two already given. A
picnic on Palmer Field is to be an-
nounced for an early date> The Lea-
gue will also help entertain the wo-
men coming to Ann Arbor for the
meeting of the League of Women Vot-
ers.
NOTED ENGLISHMAN TO
SPEAK MONDAY EVENING
Monday evening at 8:00 o'clock the
students of the university and the
people of Ann Arbor will have the
privilege of hearing Professor W. A.
Craigie lecture on "The History of the
Oxford Dictionary". The lecture will
be held in the Natural Science aud-
itorium.
Professor Craigie is professor of
Anglo-Saxion at Oxford University.
He is visiting this country at present
and this summer is teaching in the
University of Chicago. Professor
Craigie assisted in compiling the Ox-.
ford Dictionary, and his talk on this
subject promises to be very interest-
ing.
Professor Craigie will arrive in
Ann Arbor Sunday and will be the
guest of Dr. Samuel Moore.
The highest point in Europe is Mt.
Elbruz in the Caucasus mountains,
which Is 18,465 feet above sea level.

ture will be

illustrated.

BRYA WILL HELP
DAIS IN CAMPAIGN
Dine Together At Polk Residence
Which Davis Has Made His
Headquarters
CADOO'S POKLTION SILL
RAISES CONSIDERABLE WONDER
New York, July 11.-After a nights
rest at his home at Locust Valley,
John W. Davis, Democratic nominee
for president, returned to New York
today to give further consideration to
campaign plans at the home of his
legal associate, Krank L. Polk, which
he is making his city headquarters.
All doubt about the attitude of
William Jennings Bryan toward the
head of the ticket seems to have been
dispelled by Mr. Bryan's statements
that his support will be forthcoming.
Mr. Bryan and his brother, Gov.
Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska, nom-
inee for vice president, dined last
night with Mr. Davis at the Polk resi-
dence.
There remains some wonder as to
the position of W. G. McAdoo in the
campaign. The New York World to-
day prints a front page story suggest-
ing that Mr. McAdoo form another
party. Mr. McAdoo has maintained
silence since sending a telegram to
Mr. Davis limited in effect to the
words: "Please accept my congrat-
ulations."
New York papers are frankly skep-
tical of the attitude towards the nat-
ional ticket of Mayor Hylan and some
even suggest that a Smith-Hylan bat-
tle for control of Tammany Hall
looms.
Some political circles expect that
New York will be the center of the
Davis campaign. With 266 electoral
votes necessary for success and with
Davis reasonably assured of 147 from
the solid south plus Maryland and
Kentucky, according to these opinions
the 45 of the Empire state will be vit-
al and next to New York much atten-
tion must be devoted to Ohio, Illinois,
and Indiana.
There is much speculation as to the
future political career of Gov. Smith,
who indorsed the national ticket in a
speech before the convention. Asked
whether he would run for governor
again in the fall, he expressed a pre-
ference to return to private business.
SUMMER STUDENTS TO
BE GUESTS AT MIXER
Tonight at 8 o'clock in Wesley hall
the Wesleyan Guild will give its first
"student mixer' of the summer. It is
open to all studentsand their friends
in order to a'fford them the oppor-
tunity of becoming better acquainted.
Table games will be the main fea-
ture of entertainment and refresh-
ments will be served. This is in the
nature of a "trial party,' that is to
say, if the attendance is promising
there is more fun to be had; if it is
poor, no more parties. Everyone is
urged to come.

HUBBRD INJURED,
UNABLE TO ENTER
HOP, STEP, JUP
AMERICAN HOPES SUFFER BLOW
WHEN MICIGAN STAR
BRUISES FOOT
LIDDELL, BRITISH STAR,
SETS 400-METER RECORD
Osborne, Illinois A. C. Makes Best
Record In Opening Event of
Decathlon
Olympic Stadium Colombes, France,
July 11.-(By AP)-Eric H. Liddell,
the British flying parson, crowned
himself 61ympic 400-meter champion
this afternoon in the vorld's record
time of 47 3-5 seconds, defeating Hor-
atio Fitch, Chicago A. C., who had
shattered the previous world's record
an hour before in tire semi-finals.
The American track and field forces
suffered a blow today when it dvelop-
ed that Dehart Hubbard the Negro
star , wifner of the broad jump, was
definitely out of the hop, step and
jump as the result of a stone bruise
on the heel. Hubbard, who sustained
the injury in the first take-off of the
broad jump Tuesday, hobbled onto the
field today with the aid of a cane,
declaring he would not compete in
the hop, step and jump, as a further
mishap might mean a serious disable-
ment.
The University of Michigan man
had been counted on to score high and
possibly win-the event.
Harold Osborne, Illinois A. C. the
American national champion, made
the best time in the 100-meter dash,
the opening event of the decathlon,
in turning in 11 1-5 seconds for 825.2
points. Harry Freida, University of
Chicago and Emerson Norton, Geo-
rgetown, showed 11 3-5 seconds, mark-
ing up 762 points. Otto Anderson
university of Southern California,
made a poor showing, his time being
11 4-5, running lame. He was way
down the list of 49 entrants with 714
points for the first event.
WilATS GOING ON
SATURDAY
8:00-Excursion No. 6- Burroughs
Adding Machine company. Lunch in
General Motors Building dining
room. Trip through and behind
the scenes of the General Motors
office building. Trip ends at3 p. m.
MONDAY
4:00-The Public Health Aspects of
Race Problems. Dr. C. W. Stiles,
U. S. Public Health service, Wash-
ington, D. C. Natural Science audi-
torium.
5:00-Lecture in Spanish-Las Escu-
elas de Porto Rico. M. E. A. Mer-
cado. Natural Science auditorium.
8:00-The History of the Oxford Die.
tionary. (Illustrated). Prof. W. A.
Craigie, of Oxford University. Na-
tural Science auditorium.
TUESDAY
11:00-Round Table discussion-The
International Rules of Zoological
Nomenclature. Dr. C. W. Stiles.
Room 242, Natural Science building.
4:00-Soil Pollution.. Dr. C. W. Stiles.
Natural Science auditorium.

5:00-The Current Tendencies in the
Teaching of Mathematics. Prof. W.
B. Ford, Natural Science auditor-
ium.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal. School
of Music.
8:00-Lecture--Health Examinations.
Dean John M. Dotson, Editor of
Hygiene, Chicago. Natural Science
auditorium.
Grand Rapids, July 11--Gen. Byron
R. Pierce, 95, twice commander of the
Michigan grand army died Thursday,
at a local sanitarium.
He was the highest living command-
ing officer of the Civil war. He en-
tered the war as a captain in the Third
Michigan infantry and rose to a brig-
adier general, being mustered out as a
brevet major general.
Washington, July 10.-Corn pro-
duction this year will be about 2,515,-
000,000 bushels,

Robert W. Preston,

'24H was ser-

More than 15,000,000 motor
are now registered in the
States.

vehicles
United

WANNA JOB???
There's lots of 'em if you
know where to look. Jimmie
knows where to look so let
him do your hunting.
Slip up and
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

iously injured and a companion was
killed Thursday morning near Syl-
vania, Ohio when a fast New York
Central train struck the the coupe
in which they were riding. Weston
was taken to the Toledo Hospital
where he was found to be suffering
from a frac ired skull and other In-
juries. -At the latest report he had
not yet recovered consciousness. He
graduated from the engineering school
last June and was employed with a
Toledo firm of engineers. He is a
,member of Theta Chi fraternity.
Antares, the largest star ever meas-
ured by astronomers, is 400,000,000
miles in diameter.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan