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July 09, 1924 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1924-07-09

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBW
ABLY SHOWERS

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4Iit

ASSOCIATED
PRESS.
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE
PRICE FIVIE CENTS

VOL. XV. No. 16

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1924

-

MORE .THANI80 T-

SMITH OFFERS TO
WITHDRAW NAME IF
MCADO WILL ALSO
RALSTON WITHDRAWAL CHANGES
LINEUP AS BALLOTING
CONTINUES
COPELAND GETS MICH.
BACKING IN LAST VOTE
Smith, McAdoo Delegates Stage Noisy
Demonstrations; Delaware Swith-
es to Robinson
Madison Square Garden, July 8.-
(By A.P.)-Governor Smith's with-
drawal from the contest, on the con-
dition that W. G. McAdoo also with-
draw at the same time, was announc-
ed to the Democratic National conven-
. tion by Franklin D. Roosevelt, his
floor leader.
As the first ballot of the night got
under way in the convention it
brought some scattering indications
of the currents that were at work
under the new situation created by
the withdrawal of Senator Ralston
and the conditional withdrawal of
Governor Smith. Delaware, switch-
ing for the first time since the ballot-
ing began from former Senator Salis-
bury gave her six votes to Senator
Robinson. Indiana took the 30 that
had been going to Ralston from his
home state and gave 25 to McAdoo
and 5 to Smith.
There was continual cheering as
the Smith states continued to vote
solidly for him despite his withdraw-
al, and the McAdoo people retalliated.
by applauding with renewed vigor the
vote of every McAdoo state had re-~
mained faithful to him. California
with its new flags and trumpets led in
the McAdoo demonstration.
When Michigan was reached, 16 of
the votes that had been going from
that state to Ralston were transfer-
red to Senator Copeland of New York,
one time mayor of Ann Arbor. It was
the first time more than a scattering
vote or two had been given him.
Caswell Pleases
In Life Sketches
Of Abe Lincoln
Entertainment plus a quickened and
stimulated patriotism were the feat-
ures of Lincoln Caswell's presenta-
tion of scenes from the life of Ab-
raham Lincoln last night in Univer-
sity Hall.
The charm of the simple setting was
felt as the curtain rose upon a room
whose only decoration was the flag
and a map of the Union-upon which
the President had pins to show the
movement of the nation's forces.
The first act occurred in the White
House the morning after the battle of
Shiloh. Its features were Lincoln's
humanity as shown by his kindness to
"Pouches" a newboy and to Bessie, his
ingenuity in secreting so much mater-
ial in a hat which must also contain
his head and his never failing series
of Jokes, such as the assurance that a
man's legs must be long enough to
reach the floor, or his narrations of
the monstrosities of Artemus Ward.
Interest was heightened by Caswell's
inclusion of such typical incidents in
the life of the great president as Bes-

sie's plea for Benny and its success,
Lincoln's narrative of his New Orleans
experience with slavery, and his letter
to Mrs. Bixley who had given five sons
to the Union.

LaFollette Leader

MAKE EXCURSION
TO NIAGARA FALLS

HoOS NOW HOLDER
OF FRENCH LEGION
OF HONOR INSIGNIA
FRENCH PRESIDENT APPOINTS
GEOLOGY PROFESSOR
TO ORDER
THREE OTHER FACULTY
MEN HONORED BEFORE

HOBBS
TO

TO HEA) GROIUP IN TRIP
FAMOUS GEOLOGICAL
LOCATION

John M. Nelson, Wisconsin con-
gressman, is expected to be the man-
ager of Robert M. LaFollette's inde-
pendent campaign for the Presidency.
HUMPHREYS SPEAKS
ON BIBLE. THEORY
"Evolution In The Bible" Is Topic Of
Dean In Lecture In Science
Auditorium
SCIENCE, RELIGION WAR
GROUNDLESS, SAYS BAKER
Dean W. R. Humphreys, of the Col-
lege of Literature, Science and the
Arts and professor of English, ad-
dressed the audience gathered in the
Natural Science Auditorium this after-
noon on "Evolution in the Bible."
The war between science and rel-
igion revived in the last few years has
no basis for its contention, declared
Dean Humphreys. It is a fight carri-
ed on only by some scientists and
some religionists.
In the old testament there are no
scientific statements of evolution be-
cause of the inability of the Hebrew
language to express scientific terms.
Their attitude was one of expressing
such things as they had experienced!
and was essentially unscientific. Dean
Humphreys emphasized the different
effect the Grecian myth of the
golden age had on the people as con-
trasted with that of the Biblical Gar-
den of Eden. The Hebrews disregard-
the story of the Garden of Eden be-
cause it was not in harmony with their
views, that perfection lay far in the
future. "The story of the fall of man"
said Dean Humphreys, "might be call-
ed the story of the rise of man, forun-
til man knows good from evil he is
not a man."
If creation is perfect then all move-
ment is degrading. If however we be-
lieve the world is progressing toward
better conditions, we are in a sense
evolutionists. Numberless biblical
prophesies forecast the evolution of
future perfection. Everything accord-
ing to Dean Humphreys, in life grows
eternally, the goal is never reached.
SOCIALISTS FIGHT OVER
KU KLUX KLAN QUESTION
Cleveland, July 8.-(By AP)-A re-'
solution condemning the Ku Klux
Klan by name was referred back to
the resolutions committee by the soc-
ialist national convention late today
because it was connected with a dec-
laration of the economic condition of
the Negro.
The substitute resolution, when
brought in, said: "We emphatically
condemn the Ku Klux Klan and every
other effort to divide the workers on
racial or religious lines to effect pol-
itical purposes by secret or terrorist
methods."
A substitute was offered along the
same lines, but omitting specific men-
tion of the klan, the explanation be-
ing made that the party was concern-
ed only with economic and religious
issues.
A bitter fight broke out over the
merits of these two resolutions. The
resolution naming the Klan was adopt-
ed and the convention adjourned sine
die.

PARTY TO LEAVE CITY
'ON FRIDAY AFTERNOON
Special Rates Arranged With Various
Transportation Companies For
Expedition
More than 60 students have regist-
ered their intentions of making the
excursion to Niagara Falls, New York,
which will be held from July 11 to
noon, July 14, under the direction of
Prof. William H. Hobbs, of the geology
department.
The party will leave Ann Arbor
from the corner of Packard and State
streets at 3:10 o'clock Friday after-1
noon, July 11, in a special car which
will stop at Ypsilanti and which will
reach the steamer dock in Detroit at
5:10 o'clock. It is expected that the
company's agent will be on the car
to sell the special rate tickets for
steamer and trolley transportation for
the rest of the trip. The conductor on
the D. U. R. car will collect the spe-
cial return fare of $1.50 after the car
leaves Ann Arbor.
Hotel Accommodations Arranged
The party will leave Detroit on the
steamer "Detroit III" promptly at 5.30
o'clock, reaching Buffalo at 8.30 o'-
clock Saturday morning, July 12. A
special rate of $10.75 will be charged
for the trip from Detroit to Buffalo
and return.
The trip from. Buffalo to the Falls
will be made on the International
railway, and the party will be accom-
modated at the Temperance house at
the Falls, where the rate for room
and meals during the stay will be
$5.00.
Will Make Gorge Trip
After luncheon on Saturday, the
famous Gorge trip will be made, a
special car being provided for thi
purpose, and stops being made for the
study of the geology of the territory.
Saturday night the party will go to
Goat Island to observe the night il-
lumination of the Falls, and on Sunday
there will be an opportunity offered to
make the i'de on the steamer "Maid
of the Mist."
The return trip will start at 4 o'-
clock on Sunday, the party reaching
Anin Arbor at about 11 o'clok on
Monday.
PUPPETEERS TO GIVE
TWO SHOWS- THURSDAY
"The Puppeters" will present two
performances of their "Puppet Revue"
in the Mimes Campus Theatre at 3
and 8 o'clock tomorrow night under
the auspices of the Women's League
as a part of their building program.
The Ann Arbor performance marks
the first of a seven weeks tour of
such Northern Michigan resorts as
Charlevoix, Mackinac Island, Les
Cheneaux, Harbor Springs, and Bay
View. The "Puppeteers" is a group
of university students who have been
touring the state for the past two sea-
sons, having given over 60 perform-
ances.
The Revue includes the episode of
"Pyramus and Thisbe" from Act V
of the "Midsummer Night's Dream" a
famous English Mummer play, "St.
George and the Dragon', "Galli, the
Prima Donna" and other divertise-
ments.
There are no reserved seats for the
performance, and the tickets which
are 35c may be obtained at any of the
State St. bookstores.

Pasadena, Calif., July 8.-A new
Boy Scout's world's record for wall-
scaling in 10.7 seconds was establish-
ed here whe Troop No. 1 of South
Pasadena shattered the previous re-
cord of 12.6 seconds held by a North
Carolina troop. The event consists
of a 60-foot run with an intervening
wall nine feet high that must be scal-
ed by eight boys.

Talmomm,
Meni

Vibbert, Miller Only Other
On I ichigan Faculty
So Decorated

Wins In Olympics
De Hart Hubbard
Stellar Michigan track athlete whose
24 foot 6 inch jump in the Olympic
finalstadded one more first to the
score of the American teams.

i

FIRST IN OLYMPIC
BROD JUMP fINALS
UNITED STATES TAKES TWO OF
THREE FINALS HELD
YESTERDAY
HOUSER WINS SHOT PUT
WITH 49 FT. 2 IN, THROW
Lowe, Great Britain, Takes 800 Metre
Run In Thrilling Contest With
Fast Field

Prof. William H. Hobbs, head of the
geology department, received notice
yesterday that he has been made a
knight of the French Legion of Hon-
or. The medal of the order together
with a statement of the honor accord-
ed him were sent to Professor Hobbs
from the French Consulate in Chica-
go. The statement read as follows:
"The grand chancellor of the Na-
tional Order of Legion of Honor cer-
tifies that, by a decree of the 30th
of May, 1924, the president of the
French republic has conferred upon
William Herbert Hobbs, American
citizen, professor of geology and di-
rector of the geological laboratory of
the University of Michigan, the decor-
ation of Knight of National Order of
Legion of Honor."
No exact reason for the bestowal of
the honor was given, the meritorious
work of the professor in the fields of
science and political study being the
basic motive, it is believed.
Professor Hobbs has written and
published seven books ,and has con-
tributed more than 150 articles to
leading scientific and political mag-
azines and newspapers. His books in-
clude: "Earthquakes," "Characteris-.
tics of Existing Glaciers," "Earth Fea-
tures and Their Mleaning," "The.
World War and Its Consequences,"
"Leonard Wood, Administrator, Sold-
ier, Citizen," "Earth Evolution and Its
Facial Expression," and "Cruises
Along the Byways of the Pacific."
Three other members of the Uni-
versity faculty have been decorated
with the medal of the Legion of Hon-
or: Prof. Rene Talamon of the French
department, Prof. Charles Vibbert of
the philosophy department, and Col.
H. W. Miller of the engineering school.
WHAT'S GOING ON
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion No. 4. Belle Isle and
the Detroit River. An afternoon's
outing at this famous playground;
botanical gardens, zoo, pavilions, la-
goons, and wooded drives. Ferry
to Belle Isle and return from Wood-
ward avenue. Trip ends at 6:30 p.
m.
5:00- Geographical Observations in
the Great Desert of Peru and Chile.
(Illustrated). Dr. P. E. James, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00-Concert - Mr. Julius Neihaus,
bass; Mrs. Ava Comnm-Case, piano,
under the auspices of the University
School of Music. Hill auditorium.
8 :15-Visitors' night at the Observa-
tory. Admission by ticket only.
THURSDAY
3:00--Mariontte show-Conducted by
Mr. F. G. Brown and Mr. R. B.
Henderson; under the auspices of
the Women's League Mimes thea-
. ter. Admission will be charged.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal-School
of Music.
8:00-Marionette Show--Mimes thea-
ter. Admission will be charged.
8:15-Visitors' Niht at the Obesrva-
tory. Admission by ticket only.
FRIDAY
4:00-Women's League tea at Adelia
Cheever house, 516 East Madison
street. All women of the Universi-
ty are invited to attend.
5:00-The Romanticism of John Day.
idson. Prof. R. M. Wenley, Natur-
al Science auditorium.
8:00-Public Health from the Interna-
tional Viewpoint. Dr. Hugh S.
Cumming, surgeon-general of the
United States Public Health Serv-

ice, Natural Science auditorhim.
5 :15-Visitors' Night at the Observa-
tory. Admission by ticket only.

DEATH TAKES SON
OF NATONS HEAD
Five Day Fight Against Poisoning By
Calvin Coolidge Jr. Ends
With Death
SERVICES AT WHITE HOUSE
3 O'CLOCK THIS AFTERNOON,
Washington, July 8.-Tentative!
plans for the funeral of Calvin Cool-
idge, Jr, were understood today to
include a simple service at the White
House at 3 o'clock Wednesday after-,
noon, the body then to be taken to
Northampton, Mass., the Coolidge
home where another service will be
held, with buril Thursday at Ply-
mouth, Vt., where the president was1
born.
Washington, July 8.-(By AP)-
Death once more cast #ts shadow
today over the White House claiming,
Calvin Coolidge, Jr., the 16-year-old,
son of the president.
A courageous struggle of five days,
which stood off the final claim of
acute blood poisoning to the utmost1
ended last night. The younger son of
the president died at Walter Reed hos-
pital, where he had lain in his des-
perate fight for life since he was re-
moved there last Saturday that every
resource of medical science might be
invoked to save his life.
Wasted in strength by the ravaging
spread of the septic poison which re-
sulted from an almost unnoticed
blister which developed on his foot
while playing tennis a week ago, the
youth fought a futile battle through-
out yesterday.
Losing ground steadily, he yet amaz-
ed his physicians by the tenacity with
which he clung to the slender thread
of life and his fortitude under the suf-
fering of the complications which at-
tended the spread of the treacherous
disease. He collapsed early in the
night and death occurred at 10:30.
STUDENTS WILL VISIT
OBSERVATORY TONIGHT'
The university observatory will be
open to visitors, Wednesday, Thurs-
day, and Friday nights for thre.e hours
beginning at 8:15. Professor Hessey
and his assistants will conduct the
guests through the building in three
relays of fifty people, each night. The
moon will be observed, and also the
stars, if time permits.
Tickets may be secured at the office
of the Summer session by any student
upon presentation of a treasurer's
receipt. Tickets are still available for
10:15, on each of the three nights.
Admission is by ticket only.
The observatory is situated direct-
ly behind Palmer fiefd, on East Ann
and Observatory streets.
All vegetables and fruits of Europe
now are successfully grown in Uru-
guay.

0

Olympic Stadium, Colombes, France
-(By A.P.)-The Stars and Stripes
waved triumphantly tonight over the
Olympic stadium, the third day of the
Olympic games having witnessed a
great battle for international athletic
supremacy in which the United States
put its strongest rival, Finland, to
route in two of the three finals con-
tested and took almost a two to one
lead inthe struggle for points.
The two Americans crowned as new
Olbrmpic champions were DIe Hart
Hubbard, the University of Michigan
Negro star, who won in the broad
jump with 24 ft. 6 in., and Clarence
Houser, University of Southern Calif-
ornia whose winning toss in the shot
put was 49 ft. 2 1-2 in.
The United States scored an unex-
pectedly overwhelming victory over
Finland in the shotput, taking four of
the six places, with Glenn Hartramn,
Leland Stanford, second, and Ralph
Hills, Princeton, third, and for the
first time in the 1924 games sending
Old Glory up the three stadium stan-
dards to the tune of the Star Spagled
Banner amid one of the most.enthus-
iastic demonstrations yet enacted.
Although the United States came
through sensationally in the field ev.
ents, scoring altogether 36 points in
the broad jump and shot put, the third
final of the day went to Great Britain
whose great half miler, D. G. R. Lowe,
college mate of Harold Abrahams,
the nemesis of the American sprint.
ers, won the thrilling 800 meter run
from the swiftest field of middle dist-
ance men of the world.
Four American stars, onmy three of
whom were placed, trailed Lowe wh
came from behind in the last 900'mid
ers, to win with a spectacular burst"of
speed when his team mate, H. D. Stal
lard, the favorite, faltered, after set-
ting a terrific pace for three quart-
ers of the way.
Will Present
Plays June 17
Mr. Frank McEntee and his com-
pany from the Shakespeare Playhouse
of New York will present four plays
at University hall beginning on July
17. These players have given perfor-
mances during the last two years be-
fore Ann Arbor audiences, and the
quality of their work is well known in
the vicinity.
The plays which Mr. McEntee's
players will give are: Eugene 0'-
Neill's Pulitzer prize play, "Beyond
the Horizon" on Thursday evening;
Justin McCarthy's beautiful romance,
"If I Were King," on Friday evening:
"Hamlet' on Saturday afternoon, and
Saturday evening.
The Shakespeare Playhouse, which
these players are representing, was
founded by Mr. McEntee in 1918, and
is an association of artists and exper-
ienced actors for the production, Iot
only of Shakespearian drama, but also
of .the best modern plays. The press
of New York City has commented en-
thusiastically on the purpose and abil-
ity of this group, and newspapers fn'
many cities have endorsed the praiMs
of their metropolitan contemporaries:
The seat sale for the plays will be-
gin at Wahrs bookstore Monday morn-
ing, July 14. A charge of 75 eets
will be made for . a single reseryea,
seat, while a ticket for the entire ser-
'ies of, plays will be $2.50.
Sofia, July 8.-A. chair for . study
and explanation. of the late ex-Presi-
dent Wilson's 14 points will be estab-

lished this fall by the Free University.
of Sofia

A one-eyed goldfish has been
covered in China.

dis-

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