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June 28, 1924 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-06-28

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JUNE 29, 1924

Undreamed Of Rate Of Speed Is Expected
To Be Attained By New French Plane

to John, is his father's slayer. Through education than the enterprise of the
the treachery of Orme their convoy is Yale University Press in putting into
nearly annihilated in an Indian attack. moving pictures its much-admired
The story is then developed, with 'Chronicles of America,' "
scenes of the gold rush to California The rest of the program shows "The
and ends with the happiness of John Arzonia Express" with David Butler,
and Ellen. and Pauline Starke in what is term-
ed an honest melodrama by the pro-
An interesting part of the program ducers. The play was written byF
at the Wuerth this week comes on Lincon J. Carter.
July 3 when "The Declaration of In-
dependence" is played by the Yale Orpheum.
university press association. The The Orpheum has three changes of
story is one of a series of 30 based program this week. "Cause for Di-
upon the Chronicles of America and vorce' opens Sunday, with the comedy
produced with the sanction of Yale "The Leather Pushers" and Fox new.
university under the supervision and The feature deals with the marriage
control of a committee of the univer- of a young college girl to a college
sity council. The World's Work of I football star who finds that after
recent issue says "No greater service I four years of married life, poverty is-
has recently been rended American n't so sweet. Rich Martin Sheldon, an

old college sweetheart enters the plot
and there develops a double plot for
interest'
"The Last White Man", which shows
Wednesday and Thursday is a story of
life in Fort Smith at the time of the
election of Abraham Lincoln. An In-
dian attack leaves only one white man
in the stockade to save the life of a
white girl. It is a costume play with
many scenic effects. There will also
be a Universal comedy and Pathe re-
view. "The Night Message" plays
Friday and Saturday, and contains a
message concerning death by the el-
ectric chair. Gladys Hulette plays
the lead in a story that deals with a
mountain feud in the southern moun-
tain district. There will also be
"Leatherstocking" by Fennimore Coop-
er, and Fox news.

I. r

SUMMER
SCHOOL

NEW AND
SECOND-HAND

Sadi Lecointe (inset) and tlte plane in which lie is expected to establish new world's speed records, showing
tht new type of propeller
Speed records undreamed of by man are being predicted in France following first trials of a new air-
plane designed by Sadi Lecointe, holder of most of the continental records, and French aero experts.
A specially designed propeller is expected to enable the aviator to shoot the plane through the air with
a velocity far in advance of that of he present air record of more than 225 miles an hour.
Every effort was made by Lecointe and his-fellow designers to follow lines in the construction of the
craft that would permit greater speed.

TEXT BOOKS
For All Departments

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

['I

Ep .

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received 'at the Office of the Summer Ses-
sion until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday).
Volume 4 SUNDAY, JUNE 29, 1921 Number 9
Excursions:
Excursion No. 3 will be to the Ford Plant at Highland Park, Detroit,
Wednesday afternoon, July 2, leaving Packard and State streets at 1 p.
m. Arrival back in Ann Arbor will be either at 7:45 or 8:45 p. m., de-
pending on whether excursionists stay in Detroit for supper. Total ex-
pense, including supper, about $2.50. Please leave names, as usual, one
day preceding trip, in Room 8, University hall.
CARLTON F. WELLS,
Director of Excursions.
Students of Engineering and Architecture:
The Convocation of Summer Session students in the Colleges of Eng-
ineering and Architecture will be held in Room 348 on Wednesday, July 2,
1924, at, 10:00 o'clock. All students are urged to be present at this meet-
ing.
SUMMER SESSION' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE,
Colleges of Engineering and Architecture.
Students in the School of Education:
All changes or additions that are necessary must be made on the
election cards in the School of Education office if students wish to re-
ceive credit. This can be done Thursday or Friday between 9 and 12 and
2 and 5. After this week changes may be made only on formal applica-
tion to the Administrative Committee on the regular blanks.
MARGARET CAMERON.
Applied Hygiene and Public Health.
The lectures in the course in Applied Hygiene and Public Health will
be given this week by Professor Emery R. Hayhurst of Ohio State Uni-
versity, who will emphasize Industrial Hygiene. This course will meet
daily except Saturday at 8 and 1 in the West Amphitheatre of the Medical
Building. JOHN SUNDWALL.
Public Health Publicity:
Miss Marjorie Delavan, Director of the Bureau of Education of the
Michigan State Department of Health, will lecture on Public Health Pub-
licity at 4 o'clock Mondays to Thursdays inclusive, during the second and
third weeks of the Session. These lectures will be given in the West
Amphitheatre of the Medical Building. JOHN SUNDWALL.
Summer School Students Enrolled in the Bureau of Appointments:
All summer school students who are enrolled with the Bureau of Ap-
pointments for positions for next year should fill in location blants at the
Office of the Bureau, room 102, Tappan Hall.
Students who have not already enrolled for positions but who wish to
do so during the summer, should attend to the matter very soon.
MARGARET CAMERON.
Mens' Educational Club:
There will be a meeting of the Mens' Educational Club Tuesday, July 1,
at 7 p. m. on the third floor of the Michigan Union. All men interested in
educational problems are invited to attend. Dr. Wenley will speak.
OFFICERS.

Economics Reading Room:
The Economics Reading Room w
ill be. open during the following hours
daily except Sunday and holidays: 8
to 12, 1 to 6, 7 to 10.
C. E. GRIFFEN.
CINEMA,
Majestic
That romance is no respecter of per-
Thatsons or ages is demonstrated by
"Cytherea," Goddess of Love a First
National picture whichwill start at the
Majestic today. Based on Joseph 11-
gesheimer's famous novel, it was pro-
duced by George Fitzmaurice.
The victim of romance in this case
was Lee Randon, a married business
man, whom none of his friends sus-
pected as the possessor of a spirit that
was effected by spring. His wife,
Fenny, was more responsive to the
call of housekeeping. The result was
that, when Lee met the ideal of his
dreams, he found himself helpless in
the grasp of romance.
With the "woman", Savina Grove,
(Alma Rubens), Lee fled from the
babbling tongues, and they found se-
clusion in colorful Cuba. The de-
nouncement is unexpected and unusu-
al in t his strange love tangle.
On Thursday "The Blizzard" starts
a run. The story is by Selma Lager-
lof, winner of the Nobel prize for lit-
erature. The story is laid in Russia
at Vestadalarne in the early thirties.
Gunnar Hede is caught in a blizzard
in the Fifty Mile Forest, and loses his
mind through his experiences. In-
grid, a girl violinist with a wandering
minstrel show, plays a large part in
the picture.
IWerthi
A film of distinct character is "The
Way of a Man," adapted from the nov-
el of Emerson Hough, author of "The
Covered Wagon," which starts at the
Wuerth today. It delineates the ad-
ventures of early settlers in the days
of 1849, when what is now an Indi-
an Reservation was thickly popul-
a tedl with divers tribes of Indians.
Tie set was on actual desert territory,
at Chandler, Arizona.
When the murder of John Cowle's
father reveals their financial affairs
in a serious state, the young Virgin-
ian starts West to borrow money of
his father's business partner, Colon-
el Meriwether. En route he meets,
unusual circumstances, the Colonel's
daughter, Ellen, and Gordon Orme, a
mysterious gentleman, who unkown,

'Famous/
BlIends-
(eme I
4 Scotch Highball
Remember that smoky taste of good
of Scotch ?-That blend is gone. But
here's another!
Rich butter cream dipped in soft cara-
miel-rolled in crisp nuts, then coated
with sweet milk chocolate. That's
something to do with a dime!I
AFineCandy-10cEverywhere
Classified Ads work wonders. Try
The Summer Michigan Daily for re-
sults-Ady.

I

Delicious Virginia Waffles,
the best of country butter,
pure maple syrup, served
at the Waffle Shop for 25c.
232 Nickels' Arcade

..

Watch Page Three for

real values. Watch Page Three for real values.

f.- . _. .._ . '. fir

Your Feet Are
Worth a Fortune!l
Right now while you have
good feet you should take
care of them. You can't
have comfortable feet if
you continue to wear ordi-
nary shoes with sagging
arches. Arch Preserver
Shoes with the concealed
arch bridge keep your feet
vigorous and healthy be-
cause a comfortable and
normal support is pro..
vided. Arch Preserver
Shoes are in good style,
always, enabling you to
have your feet look as you£
wish.

The Green Tree Inn
Open During Summer School
Lunches 12:00 to 1:30
Afternoon Tea
Dinner 5:30 to 7:00
Meals Specially Planned
For Summer
205 South State Street Phone 1306-R

=i

_111i1111111111111111111 1111111111itl11l 1i11111111111ltltliliilt1111111tt11111~111111It1111 ili iII1!;
DANCING
Every Nite (except Monday) and All
Day Sunday at
ISLAND LAKE
Follow M-65 Out North Main
Near Brighton

I

Page Three for real values.

1~

1STUDENTS' 5UPPLY TORE
ATISFACTION E VRVICE AVING
1 1 1 1 S O U T H U N I V E R S I T Y A V E N U E-

KEEPS THE FOOT WELL

HEAR DR. ANDERSON
"E ON
"BESET BY GOD"

TPEWRITERS
Of Standard Makes including
L. C. Smith, Underwood, Royal, Remington, Woodstock, Hammond, Oliver; also Corona,
Remington, Underwood portables. Prices range from $20 up for visible machines. We
call for and deliver. Renting and repairing a specialty.
Largest stock of Typewriters in Ann Arbor.

II

w

AT THE
First Presbyterian Church
Cor. DIVISION AND HURON
10:30 O'CLOCK
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIAL HOUR
5:30 o'clock
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETY
6:30 o'clock
A COI1 DIAL WELCOME-A DELIGHTFUL FELLOWSHIP
COME

wl

i

11

-,
, '
' -
?
-_. us.

O. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS' ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery Store

F'

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