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June 27, 1924 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-06-27

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PAG P7 rOUn

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1924

Democratic Keynote

Speaker

Pat harrison "warming up"
Senator Pat Harrison of Missouri, temporary chairman and keynote
speaker of the Democratic national c onvention, in action.
SDAILY OFFICIA L ugLLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the Office of the Summer Ses-
sion until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday).
Volume 4 FII)XY,_J--N 27, 1921 Number 187
Entrance Examinations:
Examinations for admission to all Colleges of the University will be
held Thursday to Saturday, in accordance with the schedule printed in the
catalogues. Apply at the Registrar's office.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.
Changes In Elections:
Literary students may make unavoidable changes in summer elections
on Friday in the Registrar's office. After this week changes may be made
only on formal application to the Ad ministrative, Board on the regular
blanks. ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.
Students in th'e School of Education:
All changes or additions that are necessary must. be made on the
election cards in the School of Education office if students wish to re-
ceive credit. This can be done"Thursday or Friday between 9 and 12 and
2 and 5. After this week changes may be made only on formal applica-
tion to the Administrative Committee on the regular blanks.
MARGARET CAMERON.
Applied Hygiene and Public Health.
The lectures in the course in Applied Hygiene and Public Health will
be given next week by Professor Em ery R. hlayhurst of Ohio State Uni-
versity, who will emphasize Industrial Hygiene. This course will meet
daily except Saturday at 8 and 1 in the West Amphitheatre of the Medical
Building. JOHN SUNDWALL.
Public Health Publicity:
Miss Marjorie Delavan, Director of the Bureau of Education of the
Michigan State Department of Health, will lecture on Public Health Pub-
licity at 4 o'clock Mondays to Thursdays inclusive, during the second and
third weeks of the Session. These lectures will be given in the West
Amphitheatre of the Medical Building. JOHN SUNDWALL.
Summer School Students Enrolled in the Bureau of Appointments:
All summer school students who are enrolled with the Bureau of Ap-
pointments for positions for next year should fill in location blanks at the
Office of the Bureau, room 102, Tappan Hall.
Students who have not already enrolled for positions but who wish tof
do so during the summer, should attend to the matter very soon.
MARGARET CAMERON.
Excurislons:
The Ford Motor trip has been postponed until Wednesday, July 2, be-
cause of a Saturday shut-down of the Ford plant. Excursion No. 2 will
be taken Saturday, June 28, as advertised except that the morning will
be spent at the New Detroit News Building instead of the Ford plant.
Names should be left in the Summer Session Office, Room 8, University
Hall by Friday, June 27, 6 p. in. CARLTON F. WELLS,
Director of Excursions.
University Women:
A reception for Miss Jean Hamilton, Dean of Women, will be held
by the Women's League on Friday from 4 to 5:30 p. m., on Martha Cook
Terrace. In case of rain the reception will take place in Alumni Mem-
orial Hall. ROSALEA H. SPAULDING,
Acting President of the Women's League.

COOLIDGE GREETS
ENGINEERING BODY
Pan-American Highway Commission
To Inspect Roads In Fourteen
States
DETROIT AUTOMOBILE PLANTS
TO BE VISITED, IS PLAN
Forty engineers and directors of
public roads from the leading repub-
lics of the western hemisphere are
touring the highways of the United
States during June under the name of
the Pa::-American Highway commis-
sion. The group is in search of the
best means for the rapid development
of the economic resources of Brazil
the Argentine, Urguay, Paraguay,
Costa Rica, Mexico, and other coun-
tries which they repreesnt.
President Calvin Coolidge officially
welcomed the visitors on June 2. The
Highway Education board is in charge
of the program for the delegates which
will take them on an inspection tour
of 14 states. The Pan American unity
is largely dependent upon improved
means of communication, was the text
of the message of President Coolidge.
The President said: "We see today,
more clearly than ever before, that the
improved means of communication is
not only one of the great forces mak-
ing for cultural and economic advance
but it is also one of the basic fac-
tors in the development of Pan Am-
erican unity. At no time in our his-
tory have theformal relations be-
tween the governments of the Amel-
ican republics been on a higher plane
than they art today, but still much re-
mains to be done in developing closer
understanding between the peoples of
the American continent in securing a
better mutual appreciation of ideals
and national view-points."
At present, only the parts of those
countries which are near the sea-
coast, rail lines, or navigable rivers
are receiving intensive study. Mici-
gan is on the list of states to be visit-
ed, with especial attention being given
to the automobile plants in Detroit.
EIGHT ENGINEERS WIN
COFFN SCHOLRSHIPS
Charles A. Coffin foundation, es-
tablished in 1922 by the General El-
ectric company, has just awarded its
scholarship to eight graduate students
of American colleges, enabling them
to carry on research work.
Two scholarships, those of Alfred
L. Dixon, University of Illinois, and
William ;. Fink, University of Michi-
gan, are removals from last year, that
being the first time that the scholar-
ships were granted. Since 1921, Mr.
Fink has been assistant to Professor
E. D. Campbell, director of the chem-
ical laboratory of the University of
Michigan.
Austin, Texas, June 16.-With the
first concrete pouring into the foun-
dations assurance was given Saturday
that the Texas Memorial Stadium
would be in readiness in ample time
for the Thanksgiving Day game, with
which it is planned to dedicate the
structure.
NOTICE
4. All tryouts for The Daily

business staff will please re-
port at the offices in the Press
building on Monday, June 24.
There will be some good posi-
tions open. For information call
960 960
I

t',i z r
poll'
~ ~i0.~as

JAPANESE IMMIGRANTS, MANY BRIDES
SWARM INTO U. S. TO "BEAT THE BAN"

Japanese brides "beating the ban"-arrival of a party of 125 at Seattle
Nearly three thousand Japanes e swarmed into the United States through Pacific Coast ports on the last
ships to arrive from Nippon before the formal taking effects, on July 1, o f the new immigration act, which ex-
cludes all Japanese except students, business men, government representatives, and transcontinental trav-

elers.
s; 125 arrived at one time at Seattle.

In the throng were many bride

WOMEN STUDENTS LEAD)
IN SCHOLASTIC AVEHRES!
Madison, Wis., June 26.-Women
students attained a higher scholastic
standing than the nien students this
year at the University of Wisconsin,
according to tables just prepared by
Prof. S. H. Goodnight, dean of men.
Non-fraternity men averaged higher
than fraternity men, but sorority wo-
men ranked higher than non-sorority
women.
Among the various colleges of the
university, the College of Agriculture
led, Letters and Science was second,
College of Engineering, third and
Law school fourth.
Members of professional fraternit-
ies ranked higher than those of social
fraternities, and this was also true
of professional and social sororities.
Barnard hall, women's dormitory,
ranked first among the three dormi-
tories, with Chadbourne hall, woman's
dormitory, placing second, and the
Y. M. C. A. men's dormitory, third.
Abraham Lincoln was the third
youngest president of the United
State.

HEALTH SERVICE OPEN
The privilege of the University
Health service will be extended
to all students of the University
Summer session. The Health
service is located at the corners
of Washtenaw and Volland ave-
nues and will be open from 9 to
12 o'clock daily except Sundays
and from 2 to 5 o'clock, Satur-
days and Sundays excepted. All
students who care to take ad-
vantage of it are given free med-
ical service.
Physicians are available at all
times by calling the Health ser-
vice infirmary, University 186-M.

CREDIT
SOME

NOW GIVEN FOR
PHYSICAL CORE

I

For the first time, the physical ed-
ucation department is this summer
giving academic credit for a number
of the courses -offered thus enabling
students to advance more rapidly in
their professional training than has
hitherto been possible.
Miss Rockwood, who heads the de-
partment, comes from the Univer-
sity of Minnesota where she has been
teaching. Aside from the usual class-
work with an emphasis on such sum-
mer sports as tennis and swimming,
no definite plans have been made.
FOR QUALITY PRINTING
SEE
'9765e&6f(jpes6&
Thrs.Air etter impressions
711 N. University Ave.
Up-stairs
PHON- 296-R
Across from the-Campus

DAILY TRYOUTS
Students registered in the
Summer Session of the Univer-
sity who wish to work on the
Summer Michigan Daily editorial
staff are asked to call Ramsay at
2040 or Mansfield at 396, or to
come to the Press Building on
Maynard Street

h naf~a - Wa'~wa~. ~ a ~ a~tsS ai

SUMMER
SCHOOL

NEW AND
SECOND-HAND

TEXT BOOKS
For All Departments

I I -

AHRS

UN IVE R SITY
BOOKSTORE

'r _. _,

;;;z

IRVING WARMOLTS, D. S. C.
Chiropodist and
Orthopedistj
707 N. University. Phone 2662
TRY
Failings' Cool Dining
Rooms
714 MONROE STREET
One block south of Campus,
near State St.
Wonderful Home-Cooked Food for
the Lowest Price
Bring Your Friends and Have
a Table Reserved
Seeing is Believing"

'

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11

11

Printing and Developing
Our Developing and Printing depart-
ment is especially well fitted to give you
the best possible results from your pic-
tures. Twenty-four hour serbice.
LYNDON & COMPANY
719, North Unilbersity A venue

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TUDENTS
A TISFACTION
1 1 1 1 S O U T H

SIUPPLY
ER V ICE

TORE t
A V I N C-
Y A V E N U E

UN I V E R

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qW W WRIL 00 V& 19281 MW VMM Alkl

WANTED
Salesmen to sell complete line of
paints to industrial plants, real
estate companies, warehouses,
large property owners and farm-
ers on liberal commission basis.
Full commissions remitted week-
ly as orders pass our Credit De-
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you can earn $350 to $500 or
more per month. Experience not
necessary. Swift Paint Company,
Desk 15, Station E, Cleveland,
Ohio.

DANCING
Of Standard Makes including
Every Nite (except Monday) and All tL.C. Smith, Underwood, Royal, Remington, Woodstock, Hammond, Oliver; also Corona,
adRemington, Underwood portables. Prices range from $20 up for visible machines. We
ISLAcf LAKE a or and deliver. Renting and repairing a specialty.
Largest stock of Typewriters in Ann Arbor.
Follow M-65 Out North Main
Near Brighton 0 D M RRL
17 NICKELS' ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery Store
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