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June 26, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-06-26

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EATHER

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PARTLY CLOUDY
TODAY

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YV. No. 6

'4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1924

ANNOUNCEPROGRAM
OF SPEAKERS FOR
INITI TUTEMEETING
DEAN KRAUS AND OFFICERS OF
ASSOCIATION TO TALK IN
SESSIONS
LEAGUE WILL CONVENE
FOR SUMMER COURSE
Reed, Wood, Alton, Hayden, Kalaw
To Speak; Women of Northwest
States To Attend
The Institute of Government and
Politics to be conducted by the Nation-
al League of Women voters is to be
conducted in Ann Arbor on July 21-
26. Morning and afternoon classes
will be held daily and it is hoped that
at least one class will be opened to the
general public, this jast to meet in the
evening.
The principle speakers to be heard
throughout the progress of the course
are Dean Edward #Kraus, of the Uni-
versity of Michigan summer session;
Mrs. William G. Hibbard, director of
the fourth region of y the National
League of Women voters; and Mrs.
May Wood Simons, chairman of the
Institute.,
Courses tobbe offered during the see-
sion will be varied. A resume of the
program is as follows. Under stateI
and county administration will come
state and county reorganization, pub-1
lic employment, and public finance.f
There will be six lectures and one1
round table conducted by Lent D. Up-
son, director of the Detroit bureau of
governmental research, Mr. A. H.'
Place and Mr. Chester E. Rightor bothi
of whom are connected with the samei
bureau. Political parties and nomin-
ating methods will be under the guid-
ance of Prof. Thomas H. Reed of the:
political science department. Mr.
William P. Lovett of the Detroit cit-
izens league will lecture on law mak-
ing bodies. Prof. Arthur E. Wood
of the sociology department will con-
duct the course on legislation and soci-
al progress. Three lectures on in-]
ternational relations will be given by
Prof. Arthur S. Aiton, of the history
department; Prof. J. Ralston Hayden,.
of the political science department,'
and by Prof Maximo Kalaw, dean of
the University of the Philippines.
Popular methods of teaching govern-
ment will be given by Prof. Reed and
by Mrs. Simons.
The fee for the course is $8.00. The
courses are open to all women but
particularly for those resident in
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Michi-
gan.

Dr. Rosenau Sees Michigan's

Medical Sc)

According to Dr. M. J. Rosenau,
noted authority on epidemiology and
communicable diseases from Harvard
university, the Medical school at the
University of Michigan will be the
equal and probably the peer of any
medical school in the United States
when the new medical building is
completed. Dr. Rosenau is conduct-
ing a lecture course for doctors and
health workers attending the sum-
mer session here and will be hi Ann
Arbor for one week. His course in-
,cludes the laws and natural history of
epidemics sand it will follow his own
text book '"Preventative Medicine and
Rygiene."
Asked ho'w Michigan compares with
eastern universities in medical edu-
cation Dr. ;Rosenau said, "You havej

zool Best In U. S.
a splendid school here and it com-
pares very favorably with any school
in the east. Your faculty is excellent
and produces the scholarly kind of
work that makes for progress in the
medical profession."
Dr. Rosenau graduated from the
University of Pennsylvania in 1889 and
has spent his life in medical research,
contributing greatly to the profession.
The study of epidemics is his specialty
and from Ann Arbor he will go to the
tropics to study problems on that
subject there. He served in Cuba dur-
ing the Spanish-American war and
will return there this summer on an
educational mission. Dr. Rosenau
was a commander in the medical de-
partment of the navy in the Great
War.

RECEPT ION PLANNED
FOR WOME'S DEAN

SECOND EXCURSION
TO COVER DETROIT

Miss

Jean Hamlton, Guest of Honor'
At Pairty Given by League
T~t.A:o

Party Will Leave State Street;
O'clock; Arrive Home at
5:45

at 8

x-riday
LEADS CAMPAIGN FOR BUILDING
FUND; TO GO ON VACATION
Miss Jean Hamailton, Dean of Wo-
ni en, will be guest' of honor at a re-
cC ption to be given by the Women's
L eague on Friday afternoon at 4 o'-
c Lock on the terrace of Martha Cook
13 .uilding.
The affair will present the only op-
portunity for women enrolled for the
C summer session to meet the Dean,
who is to leave soon on her vacation;
further interest centers about it as the
first League party of the season.
'Faculty' women are cordially invited
to be the guests of the .omen of the
.University.
Miss Hamilton comes to Ann Arbor
from Detroit where her campaign for
the Michigan League Building fund is
'nearing completion. She has devoted
much of her time and energy during
the year to directing the drive. through
aluminae associations over the en-
tire country. The slogan. "Give or
get $207 and the plans to have $1,000,-
000 by fall are well known every-
where.
At the reception University women
will met each other socially. Sever-
al parties will be held in the weeks
succeeding.
Miss Hanilton's home is in New
York, which she left two years ago to
take her present position with the
University.

TO VISIT FORD PLANT AND
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY
Special interurbans bearing all stu-
dents who wish to take the excursion'
to Detroit will leave the Delta, Pack-
ard and State streets at 8 o'clock Sat-
urday morning, with Carlton F. Wells
in charge of the party. This is theE
second of a series of summer tours
being conducted by Mr. Wells.
The first stop in Detroit will be a
tour of the Ford plant under the di-
rection of special guides. The Detroit1
plant covers over three hundred acres
of ground and is a busy city in itself.
All of the main departments of the
huge factory will be visited.
About 2 o'clock the tour will be
concluded with a trip through the new
Detroit public library on Woodward
avenue.
The party will arrive back in Ann
Arbor at 5:45 o'clock. Last year 140
people took the trip and it is neces-
sary that all those desiring to go this
year should leave their names at the
Summer session office, room 8, Uni-
versity hall, before 6 o'clock Friday
night so that proper arrangements
can be made.
MOTION PICTURE SERIES
BEGINS FOR SUMMER
Under the direction of Prof. F. N.
Menefee, of the engineering college,
the first of a series of educational
motion pictures to be given during the
Summer session was shown yesterday
afternoon in the Natural Science audi-
torium. The film depicted the various
processes through which steel is tak-
en from the time the iron is mnined un-
til it is ready to be used for building
purposes. The Illinois Steel company
has donated the film to the engineering
college.
Educational motion pictures will be
shown each week during the Summer
session and the subjects will be in-
dustries of various kinds. Another
film will be shown today at 5 o'clock
on the subject, "When Women Work"
and "Women's Welfare Work in the
Insurance Companies."
L IT IST REGISTRATION
IGIURES SHOW INCREASE

FROM UNIVERSITY
FOR RHODES AWARD
COMMITTEE WILL SUBMIT LIST
TO STATE BODY FOR
CONSIDERATION
RECOMMEND FIVE FOR
OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP
Hoey, '24, Alexander, '24, Ramsdell,
'23, Snyder, '25, and Johnson,
'25 Are Selected
Five students have been recommend-
ed by the University committee on
fellowships as candidates for the
Rhodes scholarship from Michigan for
the year 1926, and their names, in
conjunction with the names from oth-
er institutions in the state, have been
sent to the state committee in charge
for consideration in the election to
take place in December.
Most of the schools in the state are
privileged to recommend men to the
committee, but only one is chosen from
the state. All the students chosen are
either members or graduates of the
literary school.
Those recommended by the Univer-
sity committee were Harry D. Hoey,
'24, Donald E. L. Snyder, '25, Edward
T. Ramsdell, '23, Ray L. Alexander,
'24, Norman B. Johnson, '25.
The Rhodes scholarship, which is
a fund left by the late Cecil Rhodes,
famous English "Empire Builder",
entitles the holder to study in Oxford
University in any field which he de-
sires. Only limited number of such
scholarships are available in the Unit-
ed States, and it is one of the highest
honors that can be paid to a man to
be selected as a Rhodes scholar.
John P. Dawson, '24L, who receiv-
ed his juris doctor degree this year
from the Law school, was selected last
year and will take up his studies at
Oxford in the fall.
SHAKESPEAREAN TROUPE
TO PLAY HERE JULY 19
A series of four plays will be pres-
ented by the Shakespeare Playhouse
Company of New York at the campus
theatre on July 17, 18, and 19. Owing
to the professional nature of the per-
formance, admission will be charged,
the exact amunt to be announced
later.
Eugene O'Neill's "Beyond the Hori-
zon" will be presented on Thursday
night, July 17; Justin McCarthy's
"If I Were King, which was recently
given by the senior girls of the Uni-
versity on Friday night, July 18;
Shakespeare's "Hamlet" on Saturday
afternoon, July 19; and Ibsen's "A

Mrs. Rhead And
Hamilton Please,
Mrs. George B. Rhead, pianist and;
Mr. James Hamilton, tenor, both mem-
bers of the School of Music. faculty,
gave a joint recital last night in Hill
auditorium as the fist of the Faculty
Concert series, which is planned for
the summer session. Mrs. Maud Ok-
kelberg accompanied Mr. Hamilton in
the two groups of songs which form-
ed his part of the program.
Mrs. Rhead's usual brilliant techni-
que was well displayed in the first
number of the evening, Beethoven's
Sonata, Opus 2, number 3, to which
she gave exceitional charm. Four
numbers, 'Des Abends, Grillen, War-
um, and Aufschwung by Schuman
composed the remainder of her select-
ions.
The four Negro spirituals sung by
Mr. Hanillton were enthusiastically
received. He has a splendid voice for
their proper interpretation, and a
stage presence which adds even more
pleasure for the audience.
Poland sent more than $2,000,000
worth of undressed furs to this coun-
try last year.

WHAPS GOING ON
,THURSDAY
2:30-Excursion No. 1- Ann Arbor
and the campus. Meet on the Lib-
rary steps.
5:00-Lecture--The Japanese Colon-
ial Policy. Prof. J. R. Hayden, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00- Educational motion pictures.
Natural Science auditorium.
FRIDAY
5:00-Lecture - Demonstration of
-Scientific and Fancy Glas Blowing.
Prof. E. F. Barker and Mr. Frank
Shaefer, Natural Science auditor-1
ium.
7:30-Chinese Students' club meets,
Lane hall.
8:00--Lecture recital-George Eliot's
ISATURDAY
8:00--Excursion No. 2-- Ford Motor
company, New Detroit Public lib-
rary.
Educational Club Meets
The Woman's Educational club for
the Summer session will hold its first
meeting at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday eve-
ning at Miss Murtland's apartment,
corner of Vaughn and East University.
This will bhe an informal meeting for
the purpose of organization.

Dolls'
19.

House' on Saturday night, July

YET BONUS BLANKS
TO B DISTRIBUTED
Blanks for the United States gov-
ernment compensation (bonus) under
the act passed.recently have been re-
ceived by the American red cross.
Applications for these blanks and in-
structions in the proper procedure in
filing them out may be obtained at
the office of the American red cross,
Cornwell Bldg., from 9 to 12 o'clock
daily. Special attention of ex-service
men and women of the faculty of the
faculty and student body is called to
these hours.
BURTON LEAVS TODA
FOR SUMMER VACATION
Dr. Marion L. Burton, president of
the University, will leave today on a
motor trip to the east accompanied by
Mrs. Burton and his two children,
Paul and Jane. The party is expect-
ed to be back in Ann Arbor about the
last of July when they will leave for
his summer home at Cass Lake in
Minnesota. .Dr. Burton plans to work
on the President's report while in
Minnesota. He will return to Ann
Arbor in September,

One hundred and nine students en-
rolled in the Summer session of the
University yesterday, according to re-
ports given out by Dean Edward H.
Kraus, of the Summer session. This
makes a total enrollment of 2,960 stu-
dents up to date.
The total figure of registration for
this summer ,up to date shows an in-
crease of- 201 students over the 2,759
enrolled in the Summer session at this
time last year.
The last registration this year, ac-
cording to the authorities, is due to
that fact that several schools are clos-
ing at a later date, thus brin'ing late
enrollments in the University.

STAFF MEETING

There will be a meeting of all
staff members and tryouts of
the Summer Michigan Daily ed-
itorial department at 5 o'clock
at the Press building.

London, June 25.-An international
chess match played by correspondence
between members of the New York and
London bars, VIas just ended in a draw.
The first move was made four years
ago.

,

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