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August 05, 1924 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-08-05

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PAGE FOUlt

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESHAI", AUGUST 5, 1924

PAGE FOUR THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDA~, AUGUST 5, 1924

D AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the Office of the Summer Ses-
sion until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday .
Volume 4 TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1924 Number 239
Banquet-Men and Women Educational Clubs-Combined.
The regular annual summer banquet of these two organizations will
occur at the Michigan Union this evening August 5th at 6:30. Prof. T.
H. Reed Twill be the main speaker. Tickets now on sale in the Office of
the School of Education.
THE OFFICERS.
Schedule of Examinations:
The final examinations in the Schools and Colleges on the eight
weeks basis will be held Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, August 13, 14,
and 15, according to the following schedule:
Hours of Recitation Time of Examinations
7 .............................W edenesday ..... .........2- 4
8 ............................Wednesday...............4- 6
9............ ............. Thursday ..................8-10
10 ....................... ..... Thursday ..................4- 6
11 . ........... .................Friday .....................8-10
1 .............................Friday ....................10-12
2 ....................... ......,Thursday .................10-12
3 ..............................Thursday ..................2- 4
4 .............................F riday .....................2- 4
Irregular.......................Friday .....................4- 6
All classes will continue to meet regularly until Wednesday noon, Aug-
ust 13.
E. H. KRAUS.
Graduate Students:
Students who expect to receive the Master's degree at the close of the
present Summer Session should pay the diploma fee before August 15.
Blanks for this purpose may be secured at the o.. ce of the Graduate
school.
RUTH A. ROUSE,
Recorder.
Graduate Students;
All graduate students desiring to receive a report of their summer's
work should leave a self-addressed stamped envelope at the office
of the Graduate School before Augusst 15.
RUTH A. ROUSE,
Recorder.
University Women:'
All who wish to attend the Women's League picnic to be held Thurs-
day at 5:30 p. m. on Palmer field will please sign up today or Wednes-
day before noon at the office of the Dean of Women. Only ice cream and
punch will be furnished.
ROSALEA SPAULDING,
Acting President of the Women's League.

Ex-Chancellor Is
Stated As Envoy
Of Berlin In U.S.

the Class in Play Production. Audi- show cases in the main corridor of
torium of University Hall. Admis- the library are attracting- consider-
sion will be charged. able attention.
The models were made by Profes-
Library Exhibit sor Bragg who is considered one of
Shows Crystals the greatest authorities in the world
on the subject of the X-ray and crys-
talline structure. His lecture in which
Exhibiting a serites of models-of the models were used is one of the
the atoms found in crystals used in outstanding ones on the summer
the lecture rozently delivered by course as it presented a physicist
Prof. W. Bragg of the University of whose work is recognized as that of
Manchester, the distinguished English the first rank, Professor Bragg was
physicist who is lecturing here in the awarded the Nobel prize for physics
physics department this summer, the in 1919.

SAGINAW LIBRARIN
TO SPEAK THURSDAY
Mr. J. S. Cleavinger, librarian of the
Saginaw public libraries, will speak
on "Staff Relations," at 4 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in the lecture
room of the Library. The lecture
will be open to the public and those

interested
especially

in library management are
urged to attend.

1 rrrr orrr rr'

Eversharp
Pencils
'W ARS

133

if

AT,

UN IVE RSIY
BO O KSTOR E

Dr. Wilhelm Cuno
4ormer. chancellor of Germany, prob-
ablr will be appointed ambassador to
the United States, it is reported from
Berlin.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
5:00-Individual Differences in Abil-
ity-Prof. C. Spearman, of the Un-
iversity of London, Eng. Natural
Science auditorium.
6:30-Annual banquet of the Educa-
tional clubs. Regular annual sum-
mer banquet of the two organiza-
tions will occur at the Michigan
Union. Prof. T. H. Reed will be the
main speaker.
WEDNESDAY
5:00-The Present Situation in Phil-
osophy-Prof. R. W. Sellars. Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00-Cello Lecture Recital - "The
Fool and His Fiddle"-Prof. M. C.
Wier. Auditorium of University
Hall.
THURSDAY
5:00-Ghosts in Fiction-Prof. R. W.
Cowden. Natural Science auditor-
ium.
8:00-Phillip Barry's "You and I"-

-.-

R

i

-

-,I

11

BRADLEY
TWO - PIECE
BATHING
SUITS
Special Sale at
$395

i

Small electric irons

for travelers,

$5.25

Ex-Law Partner
Of La Follette Is
Aide In Campaign]

by Miss Nina Stark were uniformly
good.
Congo I was the weird' Ratchel Lin-
dsay selection and E. M. Patton was
the speaker. The program was fit-
tingly concluded with selections of
homely American appeal. Two of Ste-
phen Leacock's lectures were given
by Miss Boss and Mr. Packard. Pack-
ard's rendition was quite character-
istically and humorously American.

One - piece models
$1.95 to $4.95

from

Every woman who travels or is away
from home at all feels the need of an
electric iron to freshen her wardrobe.
These are three pounds in-weight, not
too heavy or bulky to be e!sily packed.
Special opening permits the heating of
a curling iron. Cretonne bagmncluded
with each iron.
The Detroit Edison

These prices are for one
week only
LUTZI
CLOTHING STORE
(DOWNTOWN)

Company

'~TG
1111 South University Avenue

Main at William

Telephone 2300

I==M

Federal Tax on

v ;
s r.1
".. t

- r ~a w
- I _

=11=

Telephone Toll Messages

Gilbert E. Roe
former law partner of Robert M. La
Follette, has taken charge of the La
Follette independent campaign for the
presidency in the Middle Atlantic and
New England states.
Reading Classes
Give Recital
Students, chosen from Prof. Louis
M. Eich's classes in the oral inter-
pretation of Tennyson and interpre-
tative reading, gave some miscellan-
eous readings last night at 8 o'clock
in University Hall auditorium. The
classes arranged the program with a
view to the entertainment of summer
school students.
Kipling's "Mulholland's Contract"
was a forceful presentation of the
bargain struck by a sailor, given by
W. E. Young. The other poem of the
Kipling group was "Contis," which P.
E. Huston spoke.
By far the best individual speaker
of the program-was Miss Alice E! Mar-
tin, whose interpretation of the ne-
gro poet's "When De Corn Pone's
Hot" was unique because of her re-
miarkably pleasing voice. Other
poems of Paul Lawrence Dunbar's
were the "Banjo Songs," by Miss Al-
eath Gairety and "Long To'do Night,"
by Miss Lena Marshall.
Realism characterized the interpre-
tation of Miss Ruth Huston, who in-
troduced the selections of Tennyson.
These were relatively little known
poems of this poet. As a group, these
were the best. "The Northern Far-
mer," by A. Renwick and "Tomorrow,"

~HETHER art and a
Sham sandwich-or
a he&a d w aite&r a nd
a la Carte--is your lot,
Budweiser fits either
occasion equally well..
ANHiEUSER-BUSCH
ST. LOUIS
- -
Budwe{ wier
a laI creir lot

,a - . ..

. h

,.
' .
+ .; 4.

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da

Removed

NDER the provisions .of the deral Revenue Act of 1924, all tele-
phone messages becamef free, from tax at mildnight, July 2, 1924.
The taxes imposed under the pre4ous lw were as follows:
On a telephone toll messagefor whikh tke charge was more than
fourteen cents and not morw than fi y 'cents . . . . . 5 cents
On a message for which ihe charge was more than ffty cents . 10 cents
These taxes were highest, in proption to the charge for service, for toll
messages over moderate distanc the tax hi some cases amounting to
one-third of the toll charge.
We have anticipated the increasd useof toll facilities that will follow
the removal of these taxes and *ve prepared to care for it.
Michigan BeU Telephone Company
BELL SYS'KEM
One Policy One System $- Universal Service

OMEN"

13-203 ._
MM&M

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