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August 05, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-08-05

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1924

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...
...

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Preos. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
%se for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news publishedthere-
in
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Buidig.
Communicationa, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
aideration. Thedsignature may be omittedin
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and z76-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board......'
.........Andrew E. Propper
City Editor ..,................Verena Moran
Night Editor...........Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor..........Leslie S. Bennetts
Womens' Editor.............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Maryland E. Hartloff
Rosalea Spaulding Marian Kob
Marion Walkery 3 Albert Laansma
Dwight Coursey Marion Meyer
Marthat Chase Mary Margaret Miller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Geneva Ewing Dorothy Wall
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.......Hiel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager.......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.....Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager.......C. Wells Christie
Account Manager.............Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Florence E. Morse Florence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown
TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. G. RAMSAY
The great secret of power is
never to will to do more than
you can accomplish.
The great secret of action and
victory is to be capable of liv-
ing your life without ideals.
Such is the sum of the whole
world's wisdom.
HENDRIK IBSEN.
A BIT OF PHILOSOPHY
Football practice is scheduled to be-
gin shortly and this announcement
brings back memories of former foot-
ball seasons and revives hopes for the
coming year. :Football at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, moreover, recalls to
mind Coach Fielding H, Yost, which in
turn brings us to his famous fighting
philosophy. And so, by this train of
thought, we are lead to give the stu-
dent body some of the philosophy that
the coach gives to his teams.
Says Coach Yost, "You can't win on
what you did last Saturday," a truth
applicable alike to the football player,
the student in college, and the suc-
cessful graduate. Past accomplish-
ments may build up an enviable rep-
utation but life's battle is not won
with one blow; it is a campaign
against successive obstacles. The man
who thinks he will ride along on
what he has done in the past is bound
to be outdistanced in anything he un-
dertakes.
Says Coach Yost, "Do your part.
The plays are planned for eleven men,
not ten." This maxim points out the
student's duty in taking part in cam-
pus affairs as well as the athlete's

obligation to his school and team-
mates.
Says Coach Yost, "Leaving it to
George, gives George the credit." A
truth that is often overlooked by
those who prefer the easy chair to
the work bench, as well as by those,
who prefer the sidelines to the back-
field.
Says Coach Yost, "If the game is go-
ing against you, keep your head up,
set your jaw, go to it," and "It's not
what you get but what you give." Here
in a few words, is the fighting phil-
osophy that has made Michigan great
on the gridiron. It is advice that can
make men great and successful in
any field of life.
In modern thought, "common sense"
embodied in proverbial wisdom, is
frowned upon; but in spite of the
prevalent discount on proverbial wis-
dom, whoever makes Coach Yost's
fighting epigrams a part of himself
can't help but end near the top and
also be a benefit to his college before
graduation and to his community aft-
erwards.
DON JIJGUEL DE UNAMUNO
The world-wide venerated litter-
ateur, Don Miguel de Unamuno, has
won his release from exile after six
months at Puertto Cabras in the Isle'
of Fuerteventura.+

The poet philosopher, rector of Sa-
lamanca university, was exiled by the
Spanish dictator, Captain-General
Primo Rivera, for criticizing his re-
gime.
From this barren isle, which lies off
the north-west coast of Africa and
from a unit of the Canary Isles, Don
Miguel was in the habit of sending
forthto the outside world violent pro-
tests against the cavalier manner in
which Primo had treated him, and
aroused support from fellow literary
men in Great Britain, Portugal,
France, Belgium, Holland, Germany
Switerland, Italy, and the United
States.
Then news came from Paris that
Unamuno had been rescued by Le
Quotidien, Paris Radical journal,
which had fitted up a ship to go to
Fuerteventura. After an adventur-
ous voyage the ship, under command
of M. Henri Dumay, directeur of the
Progres Civique, arrived at its des-
tination and effected, under terrible
risks, the rescue.
The question rose as to whether
Don Miguel escaped before the am-
nesty was granted or whether he
left after being notified of his liberty,
as the Spanish Government declared
he was. Le Quotidien declared, how-
ever, that the exiled man was rescued
before the glad news was conveyed to
him.
Anyway, the poet-philosopher is
free, is going to Paris there to work
"among the free men of France for
light and liberty."
Don Minguel de Unamuno was born
nearly 60 years ago and is a scion of
an old Basque family. The Basques
speak a language foreign to Span-
lards; they are passionately fond of
freedom and independence.
Don Miguel is neither a great stu-
dent nor a great critic of philosophy,
but is himself a philosopher dealing
with his own material-"naked hu-
manity and its secret passions and hid-
den dreams, its obscure gropings and
faltering hopes." Probably his great-
est work is Del Sentimento Tragica de
la Vida. In 1912, even King Alfonso
spoke of him as "my friend Una-
muno."
KNOW THE CAMPUS
The new Physics building, situated
between the Medical and Engineering
buildings, is to be devoted to ad-
vanced work in physics and to re-
search work. Although the entire
building will not be completed until
fall, some classes have been held
there this summer. These are the
laboratories devoted to electrical
measurements, sound, radio activityfi
vacuum tubes, and light. They are,
in truth, only partially equipped at
present. '
The principal lines of research will
be photographic and infrared spec-
troscopy, x-rays, sound, and low-volt-
age arc spectrum. The radio work
will be the most advanced of its kind
in the country, and in all fields the
possibilities will be exceptional.
The building which is to be open
for use this fall is only the first unit
of the physics laboratory. When the
second unit is added the entrance will'
face the diagonal at the point where
the Economic building now is.
Although it looks as if there were
only four floors to the building, in
reality there are seven. Besides the
basement there are two sub-base-
ments. In this way it is possible to

secure uniform temperature and free.
dom from exaporation, as well as
freedom fro mthe ordinary vibrations
and surface noises such at trucks and
street-cars.
Probably the most elaborate, single
item in the building is the electric
wiring. In addition to the direct and
alternating current power circuits
coming in from the outside the lab-
oratory will contain three battery
rooms, a motor generator, and sever-
al smaller motor generators. In ad-
dition to ordinary lighting and power
circuits each unit room is provided
with circuits that will permit any of
the electric service to be used. Each
unit room is also supplied with gas
and compressed air, as well as water
and wastepipes.
The second unit, when built, will
house eight elementary laboratories,
several classrooms, small lecture
rooms, and offices. Until then the en-
larged physics shop will be used for
all the elementary work.
Aren't there some others who, on
those hot days, long for the olden
times when the Orient and Joe's kept
such refreshing beverages?
Sometimes a man can be happy in
proportion as his wife is unhappy.
This holds in spite of the law of av-
erages, too.a

OASTED ROL
SPECIAL
VACATION
NUMBER
August having arrived with all its
attendant glory and heat and what-
not, we thought it might be appropri-
ate to write a few tumbles about what
to do when the 15th arrives-that
glorious day when blue books are fev-
erishly tossed to bored profs, and the
campus becomes silent once more.
We suggest three excellenit means
of enjoying to the full what few short
weeks remain before the moil and
toil of regular session begins. First,
horesback riding, second swimming,
and third, th enext best thing if no
ocean or lake is avilable. Beyond
these three, we decline to commit
ourselves.
FIRST
-e
Horseback riding was a sport more
or less known to the ancients. It
should be a splendid preparatory
course for those intending to be
nursemaids to fiivvers. Some practice
is required to attain an average de-
gree of skill in the sport.
SECOND
Little needs to be said of swimming.
This has been a pastime of the comme
i faut (as you like it) for some years.
The cigar is unnecessary if the swim-
mer does not like such weeds.
THIRD
If the ocean, lake or river or other
convenience is too far away, this last
sport may take the place of swim-
ming. A little sand sprinkled liberal-
ly on the bottom of the tub gives a
very lifelike sensation.
P. S.-There is one other vacation
sport, but the only cut of a canoe we
have doesn't have any moon in it, so
we can't illustrate our point.
P. P. S.-We have, too,-there isn't
enough of the sky showing to permit
the moon to show, so we'll run it any-
how. Sorry, but the lake's all on edge
tonight.
FOURTH
S

CR UMBLETS
"That Prof is sure inconsistent."
"Howzat?"
"Bill got a B in his bluebook and I
only got C."
"Well?"
"I know darn well I can make a
verbatim copy better than that."
Pindar wrot an ode. We know of
some who bought and still owe.

Now is the time for all good men
to come to the aid of the party.
Weather report in the Bungville
Bugle: -WEATHER TODAY: Damn-
ed Hard to Tell.
We had hoped to run another of
Olaf the Great's short stories today,
but he stubbed his toe on the doorplate
last night and hasn't been able to
write since.
Today's Helpful Hint: Get your
marks before buying a round trip
ticket.
Taman.
Patronized Daily Advertisers.

I

Ia

FOR BETTER
SUMMER FOOD
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
338 Maynard St. South'of Maj

FOR QUALITY PRINTING
SEE
" Oum,r 5.vtxer irlp7Teshoen
711 N. University Ave.
Up-stairs
PHONE 296-R
Across from the Campus

A-

Wheel
Chair
That a few of those
who need such help
may have a place to
secure same without
the necessity for pur-
chase, we have, as part
of our equipment, an
Adjustable. Wheel
Chair, which we rent
at
G. Claude Drake's
Drug and Prescription
Store
Cor. North Univ. Ave.
and State St.
Phone 808
"The Quarry"

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