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July 30, 1924 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-30

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 80, 1924

Bessarabia DI

~P~HOs
< C) '4:
. . i
Or -

manian military establishment-in the clusively, and that Roumania cannot
disputed province is always large. count on military assistance from
Shadow Over E urope Iussia in War food them in the event of war with Russia.
The most recent reports are that This fact makes a study of the pres-
300,000 Russian troops are massed ent European situation particularly
along the Dneister, and Roumania is in the Balkans, exciting.
said to have concentrated virtually It is claimed, via Latvia, that the
her entire army on the other bank. soviet government now has a military
Only a spark is needed to set off the p
> ~pact with Italy. Italy is reported to I
guarantee aid should Turkey attempt
A Russo-Roumanian conference held to seize trans-Canscasian and Caspian
in Vienna in Anril, broke up abruptly districts, including the Baku and
whe'nn Bumania 1refused alow Be strcs nldng teBk n
WhenRoumniarefued t alow Bs- rodny oil fields. Russia in returnj
sarabia as one of the items to be dis-1 will g ly e xeusia ini-r
rl~ s.. 'willgrant Italy extensive colonic-
cuss;ed, and Russia at OnCe intimated ion rights in the Black sea districts
that if she coul'i t do it ainy other I
ti e dtand also coal consessions in the Don
way she ould take Bessaribia back by
1asm r
for ce. 1. .
0 Russia's war niiister, Trotsky, was
2ITOMF I reported after the break-up f the V1-
enna meeting to have made t warlike
speech. le has since been more A
> it dcorrectly reported to have said:
SUtenoy __
"(ur' request for a plebiscilte in Bes-
sarabia was refused by the Rounan- WEV DiNESP)AY
ins. At the time there wa; publisj. : xcur.ien No. I-"tdilac. Mo-
3sh r nik. ed a statenent I was supposed to tor ar conpainy. Complete process
EI-POLhave made threatening war. I did of man Lituring high sclass motor
- hilev not say anything of the kind, but I cars in modern plant. Trip ends
a war over Bessarabia. Roumania at 4:30 p. m.
cannot guarantee there will never be
has an army. So have we. They are
there for something."
SrRoumnia's situation is undoubtedly
r y u precarious. Since 1913 she has doubl-
ed her population by annexing terri--v er h a
KJHtory. I

5:00-Spanish Literature-Prof. C. P.
Wagner. Natural Science auditor-
ium.
8 :0-Summer Choral Union-George
Oscar Bowen, director; Marian Stru-
ble Freeman, violin soloist. Hill,
auditorium.
THURSDAY
O:00-X-Rays and Crystal Structure
(Illustrated).-Dean W. L. Bragg,
of the University of Manchester.
Natural Science auditorium.
8:00-The Place of the Nurse in Pub-
lic Health Work--Miss Elizabeth Fox,
president, National Organization for
Public Health Nursing, of New
York. Natural Science auditorium.
Followed by botion pictures, Phys-
ical Culture and Winning Her Way.

FRIDAY
5:00-Social Studies in the Second-
ary Schools rof. Edgar Dawson,
of Hunter College, New York City.
8 :00-Recital-The Play of Rip Van
Winkle by Joseph Jefferson-Prof.
L. M. Eich, auditorium of Univer-
sity Hall.
Little investment - big returns,
the Daily Classifieds.-Adv.
Watch Page Three for real values.
Rane's Quality Shoppe
WI-ITMORE LAKE
SPECIAL STEAK DINNERS
Reasonable prices
Lunches PIce Cream
l Phone 18

j il South University Avenue

Grp

1-3

Ott

-,Ii" ---
BUCWARE$T

Russo-Italian Pact Reported
Roumania is a member of the Little
Entente, along with tIhe reublic of
Czecho-Slovakia and the kingdom of
Jugo-Slavia. It's fellow members
might commonly be supposed to stand
ready to come to her aid in the event
of war, but Roumania's partners have
served notice upon her that Bessa-
rabia is the business of Bucharest ex-

~encils

AT

1 .1, --

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U NIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

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700

At SAi

of 'M/Z ES'

Bing Ferdinand of Roumania (left), War Minister Trotsky of Russia
manp showing the disputed territory

and

Paris, July 29.-The new European
war doesn't appear to be very far off.
The trouble between Russia and Rou-
mania over Bessarabia is a constant
war menace, and a struggle with arms
for possession of the territory prob-
ably would embroil most of Europe.
Bessarabia is a fertile region lying
between the Dniester, Pruth and Dan-
ube rivers, with an area of about 17,-
000 square miles and some 2,000,000

population,, predominantly Roum an-
Nn. Before the World War it belong-
ed to Russia, baving been ceded by
Turkey in 1812.
Bessarabia now is in Roumania pos-
session, occupied by Roumanian
troops in accordance with the Versail-
les treaty, but soviet Russia has never
recognized-this settlement. From time
to time Russian troops are massed on
the Bessarabian frontier, and the Rou-

-711

A I LY fFICIAL8ULL TN
Publication in the Buhetin Is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the Office of the Summer Ses-
siou until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a, m. Saturdari.
Volume 4 WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 1924 Number 231
Speech-habit-s Clinic:
A clinic for students in the Sum mei Session and other adults who
wish advice concerning their speech habits will be held on Wednesday,
July 30, at 3-5 p. m., in room 302, Mason Hall. Speech habits will be ex-
amined by the instructor and memb ers of the class in Speech Habits, and
suggestions for improvement offered.
R. D. T. HOLLISTER.
Diploma Fees:
Students expecting to complete (during this Summer Session) the re-
quirements for degrees or for teachers' diplomas are requested to call at
the office of the School or College in which they are enrolled and fill out
the necessary blanks preparatory to the payment of the diploma fees to the
University Treasurer. EDWARD H. KRAUS.
Excursion No. 11, Cadillac Motor Company:
Cadillac Motor Company will be visited this afternoon, (July 30,)
the party leaving State and Packard Streets at 1 p. m. A special company
guide will conduct the students through the various departments concern-
ed in the manufacture and assembly, of the Cadillac automobile. Cost
will be $1.75.
CARLTON F. WELLS,
Director of Excursions.
Students in Hygiene and Pubhlie Health:
Attention is called to the following lectures to be given during the
week of July 28 to August 1:
(1) Dr. C. C. Slemons, Commissioner of Health for the City of
Grand Rapids, will lecture on "The Prevention and Control of Com-
municable Diseases," on Monday evening at 8 p. in., in Natural Science
Auditorium.
(2) Prof. E. V. McCollum, of Johns Hopkins University, will (le-
liver ten lectures on "Oar 'Newer Knowledge of Nutrition." These lec-
tures will be given daily at 8 a. m. and 1 p. n., in the Amphitheater
of the Medical Building.
(3) Miss Elizabeth Fox, President of the National Organization for
Public Health Nursing, will lecture on "The Place of the Nurse in
Public Health Work," at 8 p. nm , in Natural Science Auditorium.
(4) Dr. Russell Bunting will give his series of five lectures on
Oral Hygiene at 4 p. m. daily, in the Amphitheater of the College of
Dentistry.
(5) Dr. Hugh Cabot will continue his course in "Surgical Aspects
of Public Health" on Tuesday and Thursday at 3 p. in., in the Medical
Amphitheater. ITniversity Hospital.
(6) Dr. A. T. Barrett will give his final lecture in Mental Hygiene
and Pschiatry on Tuesday from 2 to 3, in his office at the Psychopathic
Hospital.
- JOHN SUNDWALL.
Banquet--Len na d Wome Ed ncatlonal Clubs-Conkbined.
The regular annual summer banquet of these two organizations will
occur at the Michigan Union Tuesday evening August 5th at 6:30. Prof. T.
H. Reed will, be the main speaker. Tickets can be secured by calling of-
ficers or committee of either club.
THE OFFICERS.

STY LE
NOTES
Dark colors may form the back-
ground for Autumn, but bright
ones are used lavishly in con-
nection with the more sombre
shades?
Scarf collars retain their fashion
prestige and swirl gracefully
from many Fall frocks of silk.
Circular skirts or circular over-
skirts are featured on many of
the newest Fall frocks,
If,,j

IHERE are whispers on the wind of the Fall mode that
is to he. They enchant, make one eager to see the bril-
liant styles designed for autumn--and to wear a different type
of clothes than these many months have seen us clothed in!
But come, see! First creations of Fall smartness have arrived.
Be a fashion leader.

For those who are planning a vacation for the weeks im-
mediately following summer school the new silk frocks
have arrived just in time! They are especially appropriate
for wear during the days between tub frocks and wool
ones! In the assembly of autumn silk dresses are found
(lever combinations of black satin and flame colored
canton crepe, navy blue canton crepe and red, black and
white, and the many other striking color combinations.
Buttons hold an important place in the frock modes and
many attractive trimmings add to the effectiveness of these
frocks. Chlioc-< ore now, before you are too busy with
finals!

The hats for wear during the
weeks immediately following
summer school are of silk trim-
med with silver or gold or of
velvet and silk combined.
The proper footwear must ac-
company the new fall frocks
and these pumps with small cut-
outs in tan calf are especially
appropriate.
The hose for fall may be lighter
than shoes or frock and should
contrast attractively.

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