100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 29, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

P

#ummtr

4i

4

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

..-..

VOL. XV. No. 33 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 29, 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS

\UPRISING SAD
PAULO SUBDUED BY
CONDITIONS RAPIDLY RETURNING
TO NORMAL, IS REPORT
RECEIVED
REBELS DISCOURAGED
New York, July 28.(By A.P.)-Th
revolution at Sao Paulo, Brazil, has
been brought to a conclusion with a
victory for the government, accord-
ing to information from authentic
sources received by a cable company
here today. Conditions in Sao Paulo
are reported as rapidly returning to
normal.
Rio de Janerio, July 28.-(By A.P.)
-A communique issued by the gov-
ernment early today concerning th
situation growing out of the revolt at
Sao Paulo says:
"The legal troops continue dislodg-
ing the rebels. The rebels are re-
treating all along the front. We have
captured rifles, machine guns and
munitions also a considerable number
of prisoners who ail declare that dis-
couragement prevailsdamong the reb-
els who show exhaustion resulting
from the efforts made during the last
few days.
"We captured the o..ces of the
North Station and a train composed
of a locomotive and railway car
equipped with, machine guns and a
mountain gun. Our artillery effected
appreciable progress in concentrat-
ing fire on convenient zones.
"Above everything, the most notable
fact is the advance obtained by the
legal forced between yesterday and
today."
The North Station mentioned in
the official communique is the term-
inus of the Central Brazilian railway.
It is situated in the northeast section
of Sao Paulo, about a dozen blocks
north of the Mooca section which the

I
e
s
a
c1

Heads Helping
Hand Committee'
0 f Democrats

'E FOSSIL FIELD
FOUND BY cASE IN
GEOLO-GICAL TRIF
19 SKULLS FOUND IN WYOMING
STRATA SHOW IMPORTANCE
OF PARTY FIND
SCOTT, EHLERS RETURN
Prof. Ermine C. Case of the geology
department and Scott Warthin Jr. re-
turnred to the University yesterday af-
ter a seven weeks hunting tour
through Montana, Wyoming and
Nouth Dakota. The trip was made pri-
!uarily to investigate a deposit of din-
)saur bones located in Montana.
Professor Case reports that the din-
>saur deposit consisted chiefly of scat-
ored remains, mainly cordal verte-
brae, and that after some investiga-
ion there, the party moved on to Wy-
oming where more important discov-
eries were made. It is thought that
t new fossil field has been discovered
,y the party in the Oligocene strata
of Wyoming where 19 mammal skulls
:nd other material was unearthed.
Among the skulls were two rhinocer-
-s heads, Professor Case stated.
The return trip was made in the
uck given the geology department
,y Henry Ford last year. William
"euttner, preparateur in vertebrate
aleontology, accompanied Professor
ase and Warthin on the expedition,
:topping over in Chicago on the re-
turn trip. He will return to the Uni-
versity later in the summer.
Prof. I. D. Scott of the geology de-
)artment has returned from the sum-
mer camp at Mill Springs, Kentucky.

J---.-___ --

Irish Introducen
Marathon Golfing

America popularized maratho
dancing but Ireland is going them on
better. An Irishman, P. K. Love b
name, is the originator of a nove
form of entertainment. Recently, fo
a wager, he played golf from 4:30 h
the morning until 8:30 in the even
ing at the Milltown, Dublin county
golf club. He stopped only for break
fast, luncheon and tea. He had wag
ered that he could play six rounds o:
the Milltown links in 100 strokes t
round. He succeeded with 43 stroke
to spare.
GINGERICH TALKS
POET'S FAMOUS ODE ON
IMMORTALITY IS
SUBJECT
That all parts of the poem should
be studied rather than merely the
first four stanzas, was stressed by
Prof. S. F. Gingerich of the English
department in his lecture yesterday
in Natural Science auditorium on
Wordsworth's "Ode on the Intimations
of Immortality." The famous fourth
stanza is a mere decoration rather
than the corner-stone of the poem as
o many critics hold," he said.
Professor Gingerich pointed out that
this work belongs to the literature of
power in contrast to literature of en-
ertainment. Therefore he contends
hat we can expect something not
round in a simple song, but something
lealing with an inward human ex-
perience. Although it is not a major
p)oem, as Milton's "Paradise Lost,"

y
el
)f
I
I
*I

JERITZA, ONE6IN, HEIFITZ
E N6AGED FOR 1924 CHORAL
UNION CONCERT SERIES HERE

CORTOT, MAIER AND PATTISON, HINSHAW
OPERA COMPANY COMPLETE LIST OF
ARTISTS TO APPEAR
Final arrangements have been c )mpleted in the plans for the forty-
sixth annual Choral Union series to be given this fall and are included
in an announcement of the Universi y School of Music Bulletin, published"
recently. In addition to the four en agements already announced, in
which the names of Maria Jeritza, Jascha Heifitz, Guy Maier and Lee Pat-
tison, and the William Wade Hinshiw Opera Company appear, two other
stars of outstanding fame and merit have been engaged to take part in the
series. Alford Cortot, the famous French pianist whose concert here in
the fall of 1922 was one of the fine>t ever heard in this city, will appear
here on January 28, and Siegrid Onegin, the famous Swedish contralto
who is creating a tremendous furor. in New York will sing on Febru-
ary 11.
The series as it is now planned is one of the finest ever conducted
by the University School of Music. The engagement of Maria Jeritza,
he famous Viennese soprano, to ope i the series on October 23, is alone
)n event of such musical importance as has not occurred in Ann Arbor
>ince the appearance of Enrico Caru ;o a short time before his death.
Madame Jeritza, the favorite opera s ar of Europe, and the idol of Vienna,
where she has been for several year, the prima donna absolute of the
:oyal Opera there, has created a greater furore than any artist that has
ebuted there in several years.
Making her debut in New York in the Metropolitan in 1921 in Korn-

federal troops were reported
reached*the previous day.

to have!
T

CLASSES TO OFFER TWO
SHAKESPEAREAN, PLAYS
As the first of a series of two
Shakespeare recitals, "Julius Caesar"
will be presented tonight at .8 o'-
clock in Univc rsty Hall by the class
in Shakespearean reading, under the
direction of Prof. R. C. Hunter, of
the Ohio Wesleyan university. The
second and last reading will 'be
Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice,"
on Aug. 12.
"Jolius Caesar" will be given in
eight principal scenes by the 16 stu-
dents in the class. They will alter-
nate the different parts in the sep-
arate scenes. The class will follow
the W. J. Rofle Shakespeare edition.
Cooley To Tour
Lower Michigan
Dean M. E. Cooley, Democratic can-
didate for U. S. senator, started his
primary election tour yesterday, in
company with William A. Comstock,
Democratic national committeeman
and Edward Frensdorf, Democratic
candidate for governor.
The trip of the party will cover.
32 counties in the northern part of the;
lower pennisula, a total distance of
1,270 miles.
The trip will be made by automo-
bile, short addresses being given in
six or eight small towns a day. The
first speeches will be given in Pin-
conning, Standish and Tawas City, on
uly 28, and the tour will end on Aug.
14, at Stanford, Morley and Howard
City.
German Car Smugglers Active
Foreign car smuggling in Germany
came to light when the authoritiesa
confiscated a number of American and
other makes of automobiles in a raidi
recently. The owners could not show.
papers to prove that they paid import
duties.I
These carstwere brought through,
the occupied'1terrttory of the ]French,

Senator A. A. Jones of New Mexico
is the new chairman of the Democrat-
ic senatorial campaign committee
The purpose of this body is to give
assistance to Democrats seeking elec-
tion or reelection to the upper house.
LASOT EXCURSION
TO VISIT JACKSON
PRISON, EIECTRIC AND
GAS PLANTS TO BE
INSPECTED
Jackson prison and the Consumers
Power Company's gas and electric
plants in that city will be visited
Saturday, August 2, on the final ex-
cursion of the Summer session. This
excursion is usually one of the larg-
est trips of the summer.
The party will leave Ann Arbor on
th, D. U. R. at 8 o'clock -in the
morning. The entire morning will be
Espent at the prison, where the men
will be allowed to visit the cell block,
dining room, dormitories, and the var-
ious industries engaged in at the in-
stitution. Among the industrial de-
partments to be seen will be the
monument factory, wicker furniture
plant, machine shop in which alum-
inum ware is made, the department in
which the state automobile licenses
are made, the cannery, and the binder
twine shop.
While the men are being shown
through the prison the women will
remain in the guard room where
Chaplain Hopp will talk about the
prison and its work. It is against
prison rules to allow women within
the different departments of the pris-
on. After the men have returned
from their trip the entire party, men
and women, will be taken to visit the
prison annex, which includes more
than 4000 acres of land. Transporta
tiontion to the annex will be provided.
At noon those of the party who
wish to stay will lunch as guests of
the Consumers Power Company. Af-
ter the luncheon special guides will
conduct the party through the com-
pany's gas and electric plants where
manufacturing of these two sources of
heart, light, and power will be ex-
plained. The various uses of the by-
products will also be observed.
It is necessary that the prison au-
thorities know the size of the party
so all desiring to make this final ex-
cursion should leave their names at
the summer session office before 6
o'clock Friday night.
WINTER TO LECTURE ON
GREEK CIILIATION
Giving the historical background
of the Homeric poems with a descrip-.
tion of the civilization of the ancient
cities of Troy, Mycenae and Crete,
Prof. . G. Winter of the Latin and
Greek department, will deliver a lec-
ture this afternoon on "Aegan Civil-
ization and the Homeric Poems," in
the Natural Science auditorium at 5
o'clock. The lecture will be illustra-
ted.

highly successful encampment has Wordsworth accomplishes more in the
m en reported to the department. Prof. leven stanzas than in any other work
. M. Ehlers, also of the geology de- of the same length.

night, having left the party before
nartment, returned late Saturday
le end of the hike through the Ap-
palachians, owing to the development
of a carbuncle. Following an opera-1
'ion at St. Joseph's hospital yester-I
lay, it was expected that Professor
hlers will be out in a week.
Lawrence Gould of the geology de-I
partment, and Walter C. Young, '26,
no are making research in the La
Salle mountains of Utah were last
ieard from just before they went into
he range 10 days ago. They will re-
Lirn to Ann Arbor in the fall.
James Hamilton
Will Sail For
Italy August 6
James Hamilton, tenor, of the
,School of Music faculty, will sail on
Aug. 6 for Italy where he will spend
.14 months in advanced study in voice.
He has been granted leave of absence
during that period from his teaching
here. Following hes period of train-
ing in Italy under Italian masters,
,he will return to the School of,
,Music.
Mr. Hamilton has but recently re-
turned to Ann Arbor, after a number
of years spent in teaching in Chica-
,go. A graduate of the Northwestern
School of Music of Evanston, Ill., and
,later of the University School of Mus-
ic, lie has studied under such artists!
and masters as Oscar Seagle, Theo-
dore Harrison, and Herbert With-
erspoon.
He has been heard in all parts of
the United States and has more than
X0 performances of the "Messiah" to
his credit as well as many other ap-
pearances throughout the country. He
was chosen solist for the 50th anni-
versary concert of the Aolo club of
Chicago, and more recently san the
tenor role in Pierne's "The Child-
ren's Cursade," with the Hayden
Choral society of Chicago.
His two appearances here this sum-
mer have been greeted with much en-
thusiasm.
London.-The foreign office Satur-
day denied a published story that the
Anglo-Russian conference would break
up within a fortnight without having
accomplished anything. It was stated
progress was being made on a new
treaty with the Soviets.,

The problem of interpreting- it is
(difficult for we have, as in any great
poem, a complicated truth, said Pro-
essor Gingerich. It approximates the
V.ality of the poet's experience rath-
er than one phase of it. Immortality
Id man's relation to nature are the
two most important themes, however.
As we follow his treatment of na-
ture, we find that Wordsworth first
represents nature as weaning manI
from his spiritual freedom, a repre-
lentation contrary to his earlier na-
ture poems. At the close, however, he
believes that when a man asserts in
'imself his moral worth, then nature
comes an aid to a realization of his
iwn being. Professor Gingerich em-
Imsizes the fact that nature was not
Vordsworth's "all in all," and we
Mould therefore not make the mis-
ke of considering him a naturalist.
Professor Gingerich closed his lec-
re by quoting the last three stanzas
which express powerfully the im-
)ortant theme of the Ode.
DUNAKINI JEROME WIN
U AMPUS DOUBLES FINA
Dunakin and Jerome defeated Prall'
and Stimson 6-1, 3-6, 6-0, 9-7, in the
final round in the doubles event of
the all-campus tennis tournament.
Play was close throughout the match,
both the teams displaying good ten-
nis.
Greiner will meet Jerome in thel
Vnals of the singles division at 3:30 i
o'clock this afternoon on Ferry field.
Past scores indicate that the playerst
are evenly matched and a good con-
test will result.
The winners of the match today andI
the doubles champions will be award-
ed gold charms by George J. Moe, un-
der whose auspices the tournament l
was held. The runner-up in the!
singles will receive a silver charm,
and the doubles runner-up will be
given a half dozen tennis balls each,
as prizes.
Honolulu.-Mrs. Kamaka Stillman,
a direct descendant of the old Haw-
aiian royal line, is dead. She was
101 years old. -
Moscow.-A confidential.nmessenger
for the state bank was held up in the
heart of the city and robbed of $42,-
000.

gold's "Die Tote Stadt," every app
veritable triumph. But it was not un
which had been always regarded as
i'arrar, that she came into promine
ween the beautiful Viennese, and the
;uperb American, in which Geraldine
retired from the Metropolitan Opera
tage, leaving Jeritza the sole imper-
onator of the unifortunate Flori
Tosca. Jeritza is possessed of mar-
,ellous beauty, and an athletic vigor
vhich has won her the amused plaud-
s of her audiences. So vigorous is
he that she has earned the name of
'Jumping Jeritza" among the critics
>f New York. This will be the second
iAmerican tour of the famous soprano.
The second program on the series
.ill be a two-piano recital by Guy
Maier and Lee Pattison. Since the
var, these two artists have grown in
avor until their entire season is al-
,ays booked. They have appeared in
Inn Arbor before this time, and par-
ticular interest attaches to this con-
,rt as Mr. Maier is to be head of the
,partment of pianoforte in the school
't Music.
On November 19, the William Wade
linshaw Opera Company will make
its third appearance in Ann Arbor,
- )resenting Mozart's tuneful opera,
"Marriage of Figaro." Mr. Hinshaw
is one of the leading figures in the
movement toward giving the opera in
English, and his company is one of
the best of the troupes touring the
country.
Jascha Heifitz, the brilliant young
violinist, whose meteoric career inthe
'ast five years has won for him a
lace among the immortals of the
flow, will play here on December 5,
1is second appearance in Hill Audi-
'orium. Though still very active, he
1 has won a fame which comes to few
at such an early age. The pupil of
Leopold Auer, he holds a front rank
today, where his complete mastery
of violin and bow, mark him as one
of the greatest virtuosi.
On January 28, Alfred Cortot, the
famous Frech pianist, whose ap-
)earance here in 1922 was greeted
with such enthusiasm, will play again.r
Mr. Cortot has won a distinct place
by reason of his great musicianship,t
his stupendous artistic and magnetic
personality.1
Siegrid Onegin, the Swedish con-c
tralto who has been storming the us-
-ally impregnable fortress of musical
New York, has not been heard in thist
ountry long, but already she has t
won for herself a position of thec
leading contralto of the day. In an
age when contraltos are scarce, Miss
negin stands out as one most fit toc
wear the crowns of Alboni and Scal-1
I'ii. She is possessed of a voice of
magnificent range and proportions,
which she. uses with tremendous ef-t
feet.
The Detroit Symphony orchestra
vill appear three times in the Extrar
Toncert Series, on December 15, Feb-
ruary 23 and March 16. All of these
will be conducted by Ossip Gabrilo-
witsch. The organization has won a 1
distinct place among the great Amer-
ican orchestral organizations and un-
ductor has attained world wide rec-

arance since that time has been a
il she sang in the role of Tosca,
the especial property of Geraldine
ace. Then started the battle royal be-
SLEMONS TALKS ON
DIEAE CONTOL
CIVIC HEALTH PROBLEMS
CONSIDERED IN
DISCUSSION
Dr. Slemohs, health commissioner
of Grand Rapids, "discussed "Some
Peculiar Problems in Civic Health Ad-
ministration with Particular Refer-
ence to Control of Communicable Di-
s4ases," last night in Natural Science
auditorium.
"As far as the public is concerned,
hey are more interested in health
;ontrol than in any other phase of
civic organization," he said. "Let any
health board neglect disease control,
tnd the public is right after them.
in planning a campaign against di-
sease, the first thing is effective aid
and early recognition of the disease."
Speaking of the communicable di-
seases, Dr. Slemohs said that there is
only one we really know anything
about and that is diptheria. "No two
cities in the country agree on the
communicability of these diseases. A
number of southern cities quarantine
only 10 days for scarlet fever, and it
should be much longer," he declared.
"The second thing in your campaign
is to discover the source of the di-
sease. Early' reporting of the disease
s absolutely necessary for control.
After the source is discovered; the
next thing to determine is the period
of quarantine,' he concluded.
der the leadership, of the great con-
ognition.
Soloists will be heard at all of the
concerts but at this time only those
.o appear at the February concert
have been arranged for. On this oc-
casion, the unique feature of the pro-
gram will be introduced when three
well known American pianists will
unit their efforts in combination with
the orchestra in a Bach Triple Con-
certo, Guy Maier, Lee Pattison, and
Arthur Shattuck.
Sousa's band will open the series
on November 13. On January 19, the
Kibalchich Russian Symphonic Choir
under the great conductor Kibalchich
will be heard in a program of Russian
Choral music. This organization is
somewhat similar in character to the
Tkrainain Chorus which was here
a few years ago. It is famous for its
ensemble effects.
Sofia.-A declaration of martial law
by the Bulgarian government follow-
ing the example of Rumania as a
measure against Communists is ex-
pected here.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan