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July 24, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-24

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1924

-tkigan DUtiU
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
ase for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
in
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $r.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board.-----
....................Andrew E. Propper
City Editor..................Verena Moran
Night Editor......... .Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editorr.........Leslie S. Bennetts
Womens' Editor.............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marian Kolb
Rosalea Spaulding Wenley B. Krouser
Marion Walker J. Albert Laansma
Dwight Coursey Marion Meyer
Marthat Chase Mary Margaret Miller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Geneva ,wing r 1>orothy Wall
Maryland E. Ilartloff
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager....... Hil M, Rockwell
Copywriting Manager.....N.oble D Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager....... C. Wells Christie
Account Manager.............Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Florence E. Morse Florence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown
THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1924
Night Editor-WRAY A. DONALDSON
"In a free republic a great
Government is the product of a
great people. They will look to
themselves rather than Govern-
ment for success. The destiny1
the greatness of America lies
around the hearthstone. If thrift
and industry are taught there,
and the example of self-sacrifice
often appears, if honor abide
there and high ideals, if
there the building of fortune be
subordinate to the building of
character, America will live in
security, rejoicing in an abund-
ant prosperity and good govern-
ment at home, and in peace, re-
spect and confidence abroad. If
these virtues be absent there is
no power that can supply these
the hearthstone, therein all hope
buildings. Look well, then, to
for America lies."
-COOLIDGE.

CAMPUS OPINION I
(Editor's Note-A recent communi-
cation published in the Daily has elic-
ited considerable comment. We re-t
print two opinions, written by women
members of the student body, thatt
present opposing points of view.)
PANNNG THE MALE STUDENT t
To the Editor:t
Women at the University of Mich-
igan are treated abominably. Because
Michigan was the first great Universi-
ty to open its doors to women, we have
a right to expect tolerance and broad-
mindedness toward our sex today.
Fifty-four years should be long enough
to permit the male mind, slow as it is,
to adjust itself to modern conditions.
But what do we find? A Board of
Regents consisting entirely of men;a
a faculty on which women are prac-l
tically unknown; a body of male stu-
dents who think that this is their un-
iversity, and that women are here
because of their patronizing accept-t
ance of their presence. The average
male student actually believes that
he and his kind could in one day driveI
women from our university halls, thatI
women are here through the marvelous
generosity of the male, and not be-
cause they have an inherent right to,
be here.t
In spite of his plaunted modernism,
the average male student thinks inE
terms of the Dark Ages. He is a big-E
oted, narrow-minded, self-centered
prig who thinks that girls may be en-
dured for a dance, but that they are
mentally his inferior. Last week the
names of the two foremost among the
twelve greatest women in the United
States were suggested as candidates
for an International Peace Commis-
sion in one of the Political science
classes. These women who have giv-
en almost a half-century of public(
service, who are known throughout
the world, whom kings have met and
honored were scorned and ridiculed
by the fifty ignorant, uninformed, cig-
arette perfumed male students of the
University of Michigan who sat in
that class. To their movie-fed minds
no woman can achieve greatness;
that is masculine prerogative.
It may take another fifty years, for
the march of the masculine is slow,
but some day the University of Mich-
igan will follow the lead of Iowa,
Northwestern, Wisconsin, and Illinois
universities and have women on the
faculty in proportion to the number
of women students; some day the
male mind at Michigan will waken
enough to comprehend the fact that
THINKING women inferior does not
make them so.
Until then, the weaker sex (they
call themselves stronger) will con-
tinue to strut around the campus,
flaunting their superiority complex in
the faces of women students.
R. E. H.

the respect and admiration that is
their due. The trouble all lies in the
fact that the girls are not big enough
to be treated as women. They refusec
to meet the man on common ground,
be friends and still allow the man.
time to avoid the fatal flunk.
The women of Michigan are being
treated as they should be treated.
The Michigan men do not need the
exameple of other colleges to lead
them. All regular women would slat
the boys on the back and say, "Go t(i
it-we're all for you!"
F US
Just now Andee barged up to us
and presents us with a bit of paper
upon which were inscribed certain
words. We read the words and ex-;
pired on the spot, only to be revived
by the gales of laughter which swept
the office. What fearsome Ogre can
this man of Mich. be, we thinks, in
a dirty tone of voice. We have only
been here a few years, and of course,
have not had time to see this speci-
men, but if he is the ghastly creature
REH would have us believe, we just
wont be able to face the home-folks
this August. The comment, which,
dear readers,-you will find in anoth-
er column of this page, will undoubt-
edly be reprinted in many other pa-
pers, and just think-if all the peo-
ple at home should read that, howE
could we ever face them?
Knowing, as we editorially do, who
REII is, we looked her up in the di-
rectory and found that she wasn't in
school last year. We wonder when
she has been in school before, or
whether she is one of these here now
summer school bims who would have
everyone believe she is a deep philos-
opher and has thoroughly investigat-
ed the realms of manhood upon the
campus for years.
She takes occasion to refer to Tues-
day's Daily, and we wonder if she
made a mistake in the paper, or was
terribly hurt about the contribs whichC
we ran. If she means the latter, we!
thank her for having at least read
our rolls.
Oh, Michigan man-you are found
out! No longer can you hide the
truth. You are a bigoted, narrow-
minded, self-centered prig;- ignor-
ant, uninformed, and cigaret-perfum-
ed. Oh, Apollo, how have thy follow-
ers fallen!
* * *

"That'll be some building when it It's useless to extract a promise by
gets its growth," says she. force unless you are prepared to keep
"Uh Huh," says I, and we walked lip the pressure of compulsion inde-
on. finitely.
It wasn't long before we reachedj
the new Medical building. Try Classified ads for big Results.
"That'll be some building when ."
The funeral will be held tomor-
row. I

RVING WARMOLTS, D.S. C.
Chiropodist and
Orthopedist
707 N. University. Phone 5262

-1 F'

* * Vii!

AND MAY WE ADD
The other day we were perusing
another newspaper and saw a car-
toon in it which we really feel ap-
plies to the present fuss. It was all
about how some man had gone to call
on a girl, and she strode the floor'
wrathfully and denounced men in
general as bigoted, narrow-minded,
self-centered, ignorant, uninformed,
conceited, etc., etc., and when theI
tirade was over, the youth slipped
from his seat remarking that he had
come over primarily to propose, but
if that was the way she felt about it,
he might as well leave. "Oh no,"
cries thoi maiden, "Let's talk this
over."
** *
And now one gleam of gladness.
Andee has ius received another let-
ter, also from a woman on the cam-
pus, and she seems to have full con-
trol of her faculties-all of which is
merely the view of
Taman.
Of the 54,421,832 citizens entitled to
vote in 1920, only 26,486,253 voted.
TYPEWRITING and MIIEOG~RAP11-
ING promptly and neatly done. Any-
thing from a postcard to a book.
Sixteen years experience on college
work
0. D. M1ORRILL,
17 Nickels' Arcade

i
i
I
I
i

Take Your ~ l(\~/
Airplane Ride UKY)V\
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Big three-passenger plane.
Smooth, safe flying. No stunts.
$5.00 Each Passenger.
End of Packard Street Car Line.

I'
E1

If yo'atara go aoie

I':

r

r

Ii,

aisk for
G Uaot linga e
At the following stations in the city and in the county:
HUNTER'S GASOLINE STATION
Liberty at First
ANN ARBOR BUICK ABBOTT GASOLINE CO.
Huron and Ashley Sts. Maynard at William
RED TOP TAXICAB CO. FRANK ST AHL GARAGE
'15 East Liberty St. Dexter
S. A. ELSIFOR ABBOTT GASOLINE CO.
117 N. First St. WitoeLb
IIERTLER BR(S. Whitmore Lake
'10 S. Ashley St. FLOYD ULOTH
Maynard at William Washtenaw Road

"MY BEST OF LUCK TO YOU."
At last I have struck oil, all through
Sir Harry Lauder saying about "My
Best of Luck to You," for this is
what he said: "Itis a very sweet
song." And 1, Dr. Lovell, will say
"there is not a song that has ever
been written that can beat it, for it
is a masterpiece and I am selling it
every day.",
It can be bought at Grinnell Bros.,
Woodward avenue ,etroit. a nal t
all the leading music houses, and
from me.
Address m.'m9 S. University avenue.
DR. TOM LOVELI,

1 1

P

II

-11

r, Avolm i
.14

11'I'IIE STUD)IES

Cotir".

To

j

Say

"No!"

THE SIMPLE LIFE
The Summer session is nearly over,
and many who have attended for the
past weeks and intend to return to the
grind again this fall are no doubt
looking forward to the six weeks vaca-
tion before the beginning of school.
Perhaps you are wondering just how
you will spend that blissful month
and a half interval. There are of
course, the pleasures of the city. The-
aters, parties, gold and other diver-
sions of a sophisticated urban life are
beckoning. Then there are the pleas-
ures of summer resorts with bridge
and tea and tennis as star attractions.
Or perhaps you prefer the quiet en-
joymentof your home with comfort
and ease and plenty of sleep. These
are some of the ways in which to
idle away a pleasant six weeks and no
doubt many more suggest themselves
to the inventive mind.f
But wake up, you tea hounds, you
resorters; and you sluggards! Wake
up and hear the call of the wild!
Have you ever gone camping? Have
you ever spent your days and nights in
the pure outdoors with the whole
world as your tent, with the soft pine
needles for a bed and the twittering
voices of the birds for an alarm clock?
Have you ever fished for trout in the
silvery streams, or listened to the soft
music of the mountain rapids? Have
you ever watched the stars come out
and the moon rise as you sat near a
camp fire and wondered about man
and this whole mess we call civiliza-
tion?
If you have you are lucky. If you
haven't then cast aside all thoughts
of cities and summer resorts and
gold and bridge and what not; get
out into the woods for a few weeks and
the simple life. You will come back
feeling rather humble and like a small
boy. Yeur efficiency will have in-
creased 50 per cent and your under-
standing even more.

THE SANER POINT OF VIEW
To the Editor:
When women on the campus of the
University begin registering com-
plaints against the treatment receiv-
ed from the male students in this in-
stitution, allow men to say that those
women have apparently neve been
placed in a position to learn the na-
ture of men or to understand them.
It is the woman who remains behind
closed doors with a text book as their
constant companion who have suc-
ceeded in getting this one-sided point
of view, not the women who endeavor
to give to their University as well as
to receive from it, by going half way
and contributing to the activities and]
friendships that are possible in a Un-
iversity.
Women on the Michigan campus
are treated as women. They are!
treated as equals-the goal they have
been striving for all over the country
ffor many years. Now they have
reached their destination but still ex-
pect more. They do not want to be
treated as women with equal rights,,
but as clinging vines who require
careful handling and hot-house care
to attain the proper cultivation.aIf
there is any feeling among the men
and women on this campus, except in
a few petty spots such as you are
bound to find in all parts of the world,
the women have brought it upon them-
selves. Now let the women take the
consequences.
The men on the campus are to be
admired for not spending seven
nights out of every week with a girl.
They realize the value of their educa-
tion and the detriment of continual
fussing. It is not because they dis-
like the Michigan girl, but they real-
ize that they are here for a purpose
otherwise than exploiting the social
side of college life.
Let the women on the campus for-
get such petty imaginative feelings.
Let them meet the Michigan man as
a Michigan man and they will receiveI

(Editor's Note-This is the second
of a series of articles on Nature writ-
ten especially for rolls. We offer
this as an added attraction.)
Today's subject is: The great
breakup, or Why Chicks Leave Home.
The photograph shows a chick leav-I
ing home for good or a frying pan.
From the Nature-Lover's point of
view, this marks one of the greatest
moments of the career of the chicken
-the time when it fares forth to try
its wings and to make a place for it-
self in the world of cruelty and hard-
ship, leaving the egg shell which is
the modern home for the knocks of
the great city, or the buffets of the
sea!
Just a week ago, our little boy,
who-is scarcely 28 years old, came to
me and said: "Papa, I must go out
and make a name for myself in this
naughty world. Don't worry-I wont
let the bad men get me-but you and
mamma pray for me each night, and
I'll send a kiss home with the eve-
ning star."
Now wasn't that the cutest thing?
(Editor's Note-At this point the
professor seems to digress a lettle too
much, and we have been constrained
to cut off the rest of the article.
Hasn't he the most touching pathos?)
ABOUT TIlE CAMPUS
By The Investigator
Wandering aimlessly across the
campus yesterday it was my good for-
tune to meet up with a fair co-ed of
congenial leanings whom I had met;
formally the night before. "H'llo,"
says I, "I'llo," says she, and we
wandered on together. Pretty soor
we saw a flock of workmen slinging
rock at the new Lit building.
"That'll be some building when it
gets its growth," she remarks.
"Yes," says I, and we walked on.
Soon we arrived at the Law club
and dormitory.

OW safe would you feel if you believed that your bank had not the
courage to say "No" many times a day, when asked to make ques-
tionable loans or put your money into- speculative enterprises? The
courage to say "No" and stick to it is the safety way for your bank, and
for you.
That ability to say "No" to the clever arguments of seekers of funds, the cou-
rage to resist the impulse to greater, but more doubtful profits, the ability to be
content with safe but sure returns, is the secret of a successful banking business.

"Eternal vigilance is the price of safety."
and wildcat speculative adventure it is no
It calls for careful thinking. The wonder
few.

In these days of frenzied finance
mean task to keep clear heads.
is, not that so many fail, but so

And so you owe us the obligation to accept our decision cheerfully if we say
"No" to you. If we lacked that courage you would not want your money
here. The security of thousands of our depositors is more important than our
obligation to you. You may think your proposition is perfectly safe, and
possibly it is, but the law of averages is too invincible for us to gamble on with
money that does not belong to us.
The chances of your success balanced against the disaster to the community
resulting from the failure of a bank brings to the forefront our need fore care.
If we were not careful the savings of years might be wiped out overnight.
More than half a century of experience has made us conservative, but not too
much so. We realize our responsibility. We're trying faithfully to serve.
In the measure that the community and our own institution have grown, we be-
lieve we have been successful.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
OLDEST AND STRONGEST BANK IN WASHTENAW CO.
2 OFFICEs-707 N. UNIVERSITY AVE. AND COR. MAIN AND HURON

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