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July 22, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-22

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PAGE2 TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1924

J

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
in.
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.5o;
Offices; Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communication will receive no con-
sideation. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board......
..................Andrew E. Propper
City Editor.................Verena Moran
Night Editor..t.......Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor.........Leslie S. Bennetts
Womens' Editor.............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marian Kolb
Rosalea Spauldig Wenley B. Krouser
Marion Walker J. Albert Laansma
Dwight Coursey Marion Meyer
Marthat Chase Mary Margaret Miller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Geneva Ewing Dorothy Wall
Maryland E. lartloff
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager......Hi M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager....... C. Wells Christie
Account Managerr.............Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Florence E. Morse Florence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown
TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. S. MANSFIELD
"The pursuit of truth is chi-
merical. That is why it is so
hard to say what truth is. There
is no permanent absolute truth;
what we should pursue is the
most convenient arrangement of
our ideas.
We can neither refine what
we mean by truth nor be in
doubt as to our meaning. Andf
this I suppose must be due to
the antiquity of the instinct that,
on the whole directs us toward
truth. We cannot self-vivisect
ourselves in respect of such a
vital function, though we can
discharge it normally and eas-
ily enough so long as we do not
think about it ..g. An absolute
lie may live-for it is a true lie,
and is saved by being flecked
with a grain of its opposite. Not
so absolute truth.
Whenever we push truth hard
she comes to earth in contradic-
tion in terms, that is to say, is
falsehood . . . . Truth generally
is kindness but where the two
diverge or collide, kindness
should override truth."
-SAMUEL BUTLER.

PANNING THE ADMINISTRATION
Echoes from other student newspa-
pers in the Conference to which we
daily leand ear, proclaim . the fact
that the favorite pastime of panning
the university administration does not
abate even during the hot and weary
Summer months.
From the editorial columns of one
publication comes the lament that the
administration is to blame for the poor
condition of the swimming beach in
the vicinity of the campus. Again we
hear that a history course is not
taught in an intelligent fashion, and
still a third publication offers an ex-
planation for student failures in the
theory that all professors are narrow
and arrogant in their attitude toward
students.
When students learn that co-opera-
tion and investigation with the fac-
ulty of. their institutions rather than
blind attack is the more facile and
less rocky road to reform, the publica-
tion vs. the faculty problem will have
been solved.
In administrative problems the ad-
vice not the antagonism of the stu-
dent is to be sought. The good old
,hip on the shoulder makes kindling
wood for a big or little fire of animosi-
ty between the publication and its in-
stitution.
EDITORIAL COMMENT
__1

OASTED OLL
MORE
WEEKS

And now for the answer: Not many
Today's helpful hint: Buy a fan-
Adv.
Taman.
Patronized Daily Advertisers.

MENTAL OLYMPICS
(The New York Times)
It has been rumored that the com-
mittee in charge of the Olympic Games
thought of reviving one phase of the
ancient Greek festival which has been
neglected in the modern edition. Poets
and orators did not take part in the
regular events at old Olympia, but
they were an important factor in the
side-shows. They also made them-
selves useful by celebrating the tri-
umphs of the celebrateers, the sprint-
ers and the wrestlers. This custom
might have meant the presentation at
the Theater Francais or the Odeon of
plays by the dramatists of all nations,
or the bestowal by an international
jury of first, second and third prizes
for philosophical lectures delivered by,
let us say, an Englishman, an Italian
and an American at the Sorbonne. The
project, however, was apparently too
ambitious, and little has been heard
of it.
In behalf of such an Olympic festiv-
al of the mind ywould be the improved
chances for the little nations. Fin-
land is an extraordinary exception
from which no general rule can be
deduced. The little peoples as a whole
have not made much of a showing
since the first modern games at
Athens twenty-eight years ago. They
have done much better in the intellec-
tual Olympics that go by the name of
the Nobel Prize. Out of 115 Nobel
Prizes distributed since 1901 in
physics, chemistry, medicine, litera-
ture and peace, the small mationalities
have carried off 35, or nealy one-
third. Almost exactly one-half the
number have gone to Scandinavia,
Little Switzerland has won 8 prizes,
Holland 6, Belgium 4, Austria 4. Ben-
gal, which can scarcely be imagined
as carrying off any decisive honors in
the stadium, scored one Nobel winner
in the person of Tagore.
The lift to the right kind of national
pride given by this kind of victory, in
a field where numbers do not weigh
so heavily, is not to be underestimated.
Norway, as the country of Ibsen,
Bjornson and Hamsun, or Belgium,
as the country of Maeterlinck, bull
much more largely in the eyes of the
r orld than their population statistics
might seem to justify.
Suggestion has been made for the
erection of a broadcasting station ai
the Peace Portal erected on the Unit-
ed States-Canadian border for thb
dissemination of peace messages.

The crumbs are awfully dusty, we
know, but we're getting fed up on this
here now summer school. Honest,
now, aren't you, too? It's too Da-mn
hot to work-even the holls are burn-
ed.
* * *
The Campus Opinion of Sunday has
brought a burst of protest and admir-
ation from various and sundry of our
contribs-from men and women, re-
spectively. We print them all:
1
CYANIDE IS CONSIDERI) GOOD
Dear Taman:
Who is G. D., and why? Undoubted-
ly, 'tis a woman. No one but a wom-
an could write such ineffable guff and
expect those who have been on the
campus more than a year to take it
seriosuly. There was some good stuff
in it, but, oh, Taman-to think that
we must be lectured to on a subject
of "hide-bound prejudices!" It cuts
me to the quick. Please tell me the
best and fastest way to shuck off this
mortal coil.
ALOYSUS.
*t It *
SHE THANKS YOU
Dear Taman:
If you know G. D., will you please
convey to her my heartiest congratu-
lations? At last someone has express-
ed the cause of the poor benighted co-
ed. More power to her Corona! I,
too, have become a cynic over the
brutal treatment offered us at this in-
stitution.
ALICIA.
MAYBE THERE ISN'T ANY
Taman; Dear sir:
Apropos of the Campus Opinion
printed in Sunday's Daily, I feel the
urge to write and ask who did it. I
foreswear all thoughts of murder, but
it would interest me to know. It was
a fine piece of editorializing, I must
admit?. but why not the whole works?
How about the other side of the ques-
tion? Good stuff, at that, though, let's
have some more.
By the way, I'm in that class of the
outbursts of which you speak. I sin-
cerely hope she read the rolls after
the last spasm. If it happens again,
we shall leave together.
iLLUI.
NATURE S'TUDIES
Af1

,A-

Corns and
Blistered
Feet
Bring
Comfort
to so few people in these
days of Hot Cement and
Hard Floors, to say noth-
ing of shoes, too large for
the wearer, that we joined
the ranks of the
Comfort
Seekers,
Don't Wear.

I'l

GROOMES' BATHING BEACH
Whitmore Lake
Refrcshments Of All Kinds
Take Your
Airplane Ride
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Big three-passenger plane.
Smooth, safe flying. No stunts.
$5.00 Each Passenger.
End of Packard Street Car Line.
Daily Excursion to
PUT-IN-BAY
Sflc One Round Trip $ 425 Sundays
Way (Return Same Day) Holidays
Leaves Detroit Daily 9 a. m. (E. T.)
The finest exclusive excursion steamer, the Put-in-Bay, noted for
its large ballroom, makes this trip a memorable one. Orchestra and
dancing aboard, without extra charge. Cafeteria aboard.
Four hours crammed with outdoor pleasures at Put-in-Bay-bathing-dancing-
groves for lunching and athletic fields. See the wonderful Caves, and Perry's
historic monument.
Connections at Put-in-Bay with steamers for Cleveland. Toledo and Lakeside.
Daily to Sandusky
The Put-in-Bay goes to Sandusky every day. Fare-$1.50 one way.
Special Friday Excursions to Cedar Point
(After July 4th)
A special excursion is made every Friday to Cedar Point-the fresh water rival
to Atlantic City-the finest bathing beach in the world-large summer hotels,
groves, and all outdoor amusements. Four hours at Cedar Point and seven
hours at Put-in-Bay! Leaving Cedar Point at 5 p m. and Put-in-Bay at 7 p. m.;
arrive back in Detroit 10:30 p. m. Fare-Cedar Point, $1.75.round trip; Put-in-
Bay, 80 cents.
Dancing Moonlights Write for Map Folder
Leaves Detroit 8:45 p. m. Ashley & Dustin
Fare, Wed., Thurs. 60c. Sat., Steamer Line
Sun. and Holidays, 75c.
Foot of First Street
Detroit, Mich.
I ~ s

orns
Ask Us

at

G. Claude Drake's
Drug and Prescription
Store
Cor. North Univ. Ave.
and State St.
Phone 308
"The Quarry"

Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

DETERMINATION
There are some men whom nothing
can stop.
An East Prussian school teacher
wanted to fly. But he didn't have any
too much money and so he decided
to make his own flying machine. He
gathered together some poles and tin
cans and made a blider-a home-made
heavier than air product without a
motor. When he had finished his ma-
chine he tried to enter it in a big
gliding contest in Germany. But the
judges decided that his machine was
unsafe and ruled him out of the con
test.
The following year, the East Pruss
ian school teacher had another ma
chine entered in the gliding contest
It was very much like his first one bu
he had given it a coat of paint and i
passed the contest judges. In hi
crude, home made glider the schoo
teacher broke the world's record, re
maining in the air over 42 minutes.
A similar case took place in a smal
Illinois town. Here a man wantedo
piano but he could not spare the
money to purchase one. So he buil
his own, a baby grand. It took himn
two years to shape and assemble the
5,000 separate pieces. Now he has fin
ished it and experts declare that i
looks and sounds like the finest fac
tory-made instrument.
One man builds his own flying-ma
chine; another, his own piano.
Handicaps and obstacles can be
overcome; these and a hundred oth
er cases prove it.

l
1
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L
.,
s
t
e

(Editor's Note-This is the first of
a series of articles on Nature written
by a prominent scientist especially for
Rolls. We offer this as an added at-
traction.)
Today's subject-is: The Hen and
the Worm. In the photograph used to
illustrate the topic, the reader will
have to take the word of the writer
in regard to the .sex of the beast.
From the coy pose of the hen, we are
to infer the attacks of hunger upon
her gizzard which impel her to gaze
in a hungry manner upon the worm,
which in this case is of a rare spe-
cies: that which is call "oli galiphor-
us" due to its habit of standing on
its head. Careful reseach is necessary
to determine that it is the head upon
which the worm is standing.
Now that all this hasbeen gone
over carefully, we shall ask today's
question: "Does the Hen Eat the
Worm, and if so, Why?"
MATHEMATICS IN THE HOME
At the request of certain students
of the Engineering college, we have
worked out a problem which has long
been troubling the minds of those
connected with the teaching of cal-
culus. The problem is: If the strain
on a bridge equals 2, and the tensil
strength equals 2, how many wagons
can pass over it in a day?
We proceeded to formulate the fol-
lowing equation:
X3bvd + 14SCW sq - 3789430zlp
equals the answer.
We solved the equasion after a long
and tedious strain on the mind. We
1 T4
insert our photograph taken while
hard at work just to prove that we
did it in our own head.

Arcade raneh
Formerly Jane Singleton Shop
8 Nickel's Arcade
CLEARAN...CE SALE
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
Two Days Only
To make room for some slight alterations which are to be made, also
for the new stocks which will soon arrive, we will put on sale practically the
entire stock taken over from Miss Singleton consisting of HIGH GRADE
BLOUSES-SWEATERS-SILK UNDERWEAR-HOISERY-
AND NOVELTIES.
A Few of the Specials
Sweaters, Values up to $6.75 at. . ........$2.95
Blouses, Values to $5.95 at...............$2.95
Those marked to sell up to $3.50 at.....=.$1.95
Those marked to sell up to $6.50 at........$2.95

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KNOW YOUR CAMPUS
The memorial of which we1
hear the most is Tappan Oak
held in veneration by all senior
classes. This rugged old tree
was given its name by the class
of 1858. The seniors of that
year, in order to supply the need
of trees for shade and ornament-
al purposes set out 48 maples
in concentric circles around a
native oack, each member plant-
ing a tree.
Most of the maples are either
used or cut down to make room
for the Library building; but
Tappan Oak, situated just east of
the new Library, still survives
as a memorial to Chancellor
Henry F. Tappan, first president
of the university, for whom it
was named.

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