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July 14, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-14

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ZI 4 P

'umnu~r

AIR AND WARMER
TODAY

i3~r uan

:43AOW
tl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

No. 19

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1923

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.r 6. BOOTH GIVES
INIIERSITY $20,000
FOR FELLOWSHIPS
UND TO BE USED TO SEND ARCH-
ITECTURAL STUDENTS r
ABROAD
ONOR IS PROMINENT
DETROIT PUBLISHER

ent To Be Selected On Basis
Record and Competition/ In
Design

-f

gift of $20,000, to be used
ishing fellowships in the
rchitetcure, has been given
versity by George G. Booth,

in es-
school
to the
of De-

it. This gift is to be known as the
orge G. Booth fellowship and the in-
ne from the $20,000 is to provide
r the maintainence of one student
road each year, to further pursue
studies in the architectural field.
e student will be selected on the
sis of his entire scholastic record,
d competition in archite ural de-
:n. The university to which the stu-
it will be -sent has not yet been
cided on, but it is thought that it
11 be whatever one the student him-
f will prefer.
Hr. Booth, one of . the prominent
wspapermen in the country, is one
the best known npatros of the arts
the state. Mr. Bootha ispresident of
eDetroit News and also of the "De-
dt Society of Arts and Crafts, and
s been interested in the University
r many years. In founding this fel-
tship, Mr. Booth has given one of
e most substantial gifts ever receiv-
by the college of architecture.
I P s1 KI *_NEW RING BOUTS
obably Will Not be Matched With
Dempsey-Wants Fight With
Harry Wills
EADY TO FIGHT ANYBODY
AT ANYDIE, AT ANYPLACE"
New York, July 13-(By A.P.)-
uis Angel Firpo, tireless battler of
e Argentine, who added Jess Wil-
rd to his list of victims last night
fore a record crowd at Boyle's Thir-
Acres was looking around for new
>rlds to conquer today. A series
conferences however during the
y failed to bring any action with a
ospective title match with Jack
mipsey and indications pointed to
e probability that Firpo admittedly
ill is lacking in the fine points of
ng science, would have one or - two
:re fistic matches before he gets
shot at the title.
Wants to Meet Wills
As a matter of fact, Firpo in the
urse of a long talk with Tex Rick-
d this afternoon at Madison Square
arden, expressed his desire to fight
arry Wills, New Orleans negro, who
s stood out as a title challenger for
ore.than a year.
The sombre South American bear-
g no outward marks of the conflict
which he crushed the 'comeback
>pes of the former champion tonight
conically added that he was ready
o fight anybody, any time, any
ace". ,
ondon Train Goes 60 Miles Per Hour
London, July 13.-(B yA.P.)-The
gular summer train, now running
tween- London and Swindon (77 1-2
iles) travels at 61.8 miles an hour.

EDITORIAL
-I
MONOPOLY
Yesterday a young man in a certain
class opened upon his professor a vol-
ley of questions which hummed angri-
ly across the short space of the room
with machine gun-like incessance for
a period of 20 minutes
The young student was undoubtedly
a aoul hungry individual earnest in
his 'search for learning but so filled
with potential questioning that he has
l*come a walking question mark.
Some of his questions weie intellig-
ten others were non-essential and all
were uttered with a vehemence and
argumentative stolidity that bespoke
a selfish mind. Twenty-five fellow stu-
dents sat through this 20 minutes of
monopoly, silently indignant.
This sort of monopolist should have
been the the sole pupil of a tutor,
certainly not a student in a University
professor's class
WOMEN'S WRONGS
The movement for equal rights for
women which swept the country when
the suffrage question was at its height
and which has since been a funda-
mental interest in the politics of the'
country has at last had a turn that
cannot but be distressing to the wom-
anhood of the country When the fem-
nists asked for their rights and got
them, they undoubtedly forgot that
they would be responsible equally for
their wrongs ,
Within the past two weeks two
women in the city of Chicago have
been sentenced to death, both being
found guilty by male juries. A trem-
endous change, seems to have taken
pleae suddenly In Chicagohwhich has
heretofore been oted for its acquittals
of murdresses. Three years ago a
woman convicted of murder and even
sentenced to prison was an unheard
of situation and every woman in the
c'ountry who had a suitor or incon-
venient husband to get rid of would
make the Chicago courts her stamping
ground. Suddenly with no warning
whatsoever these two juries come out
and boldly sentence one woman to
hang and another to die in the electric
chair
There seems to be come sort of a
slip up here; either the women were
not sufficiently clever or' beautiful
enough to bring the jury to tears or
the latter had predetermined.that Chi-
cago's disgraceful reputation for ac-
quitted woman murderers must be
changed at once and had steeled them-
selves against the tearful pleas which
were directed toward them
The time now seems to be at liand
when every court in th ecountry can
follow the example set by this one and
show woman that she has no more
right to brutilly murder whom she
chooses than has man.
The last few years have proven that
woman is the equal of man in many
walks of life and she also has assumed
her rights with dignity and taken the
credit due her for her acts ."Why
then should she not pay the came pen-
alty for her' misdemeanors that man
does?
It is hard to realize that the oldest
man wearing a United'States navl uni-
form, a veteran 99 years old, is spend-
Ing his last days in a county poor-
house waiting for some action on his
application for a pension.
Twenty thousands bills were pend-
ing in Congress at adjournment. Nine
hundred thirty one had been enacted.
It appears that congressional energy

is devoted to taking strangers in but
not in taking care of them after they
arrive.
" be it so humble, there's
no place like home." No, but there are
always lots of humbler places.

"PASSING OF THIRD
FLOOR BACK("GIVEN
N PLEASING FORMI
"PLAY MAKES MOMENTARY, YET
PROFOUND IMPRESSION," SAYS
CRITIC
MAC FNTEE SCORES HIT
AS "THIRD FLOOR BACK'
Gertrude Linnell Performs Role of
Stasia, the Slavey, Well-Kel-
ly Good as Hajor
Jerome K. Jeromo's "Passing of
the Third Floor Back," which was
presented in the campus open air the-
ater last night by the .Shakespeare
Playihouse company, is the sort of
pay that really shouldn't be reviewed
until a week after the performance-
unless. you've seen' it before. One may
safely say, however, that it makes a

profound impression;

momentary,

perhaps, but still profound. You see
the play, and watch Mr. McEntee, as,
the Third Floor Back, change the'
whole character of a boarding house
by simply being decent to all the peo-
ple in it; and you feel quite uplifted
until you begin to have a sneaking
suspicion that it's tremendously over-
done and silly. And yet on the other
hand there's the feeling that you
shouldn't say it's overdone and silly,
because there may be people who did
not think so at gall.
Mr. McEntee played his rather im-
possible role with all the sympathy_
necessary to put it across; his voice
was admirably suited to the part of
,missionary and visiting saint. It
seemed especially fitting that he, as
-the main dharacter, should have so.
little stage business. He simply en-
tered, sat down and stood up, and
talked; his relative inactivity bore
out the impression that he was not
at all a physical being.
The other roles-it would hardly be
fair to call them minor-were well
done, with the possible exception of
the two young lovers' parts; Mr. Web-
ster, as Christopher Tenny, the young
painter, rendered his lines with the
throaty effect that seems to have be-
come conventional. for such a st'ate-
ment as "I want you!" And Miss'
Homer, who played opposite him,
screamed out her emotion in a per-
fectly orthodox manner.
Mi'ss Linnell, as Stasia, the slavey,
handled her rather complicated part
very satisfactorily; her quick changes
of mood semed natural,. she held on
to her Cockney accent well, and she
managed to look her part. Mr. Kelly,
as Major Tompkins, retired, was just"
enough of a Britisher; if he had been
less, his audience maight have thought
him American, and if he had been'
more ,they wouldn't have understood
him.
-S.M.
FRENCH PRESS DISPLEASED
WITH BALDWIN'S STATEMENT
Parit, July 13-(By A.P.)-The Bri-
tish Prime Minister's statement of
policy was reflected with a sugar coat-
ing by the French newspapers over-
night and this afternoon edition had
become rather acid with a strong fla-
vor of sarcasm and some ridicule in
the comments.
The semi-official "Temps" contain-
ed a statement that "England persists
in the policy of maintaining a balance
of power between the nations of the
European continent. All the news-
papers emphasized that Premier
Baldwin condemned the Ruhr occu-
pation but reproved the German ac-
tion in resistance.

Natural, Science
Building Court
To Be Utilized
The interior court of the Natural
Science building is in the process of
being beautifie~d by the University
Building and 'Grounds department.
A water pond has been constructed in
the form of a clover leaf, and will
serve as an adopted abode for all sorts
of aquatic plants and botanical or
zoological specimens of one kind and
another. The pond is about eight feet
deep and will serve as a convenient
source of fresh water algae to be
used as class material during the win-
ter season.
Ferns To Surround Pond
The pond is to be suarounded by a
collection of various spepies of ferns.
A small green house has been erect-
ed to one side of the court which is to
contain mosses and liverworts for use
in the laboratory.
Because of the fact that the court
is extremely well protected from the
winds and weather it promises to be
an interesting little botanical garden.
114 BOYS ATRESH'
AIR CAMP OUTING
Twelve Different Nationalities Rep-
resented in Detroit Grout'
at Lakes
CAMPAIGN MAY BE HELD TO
RAISE ADDITIONAL FUNDS
One hundred and fourteen small
boys from the poor families of the
Hamtramck district of Detroit; rep-
resenting more than 12 different na-
tionalities are enjoying a ten day out-
ing at the University Fresh Air camp,
an institution maintained by the stu-
dents, alumni and friends of the Un-
iversity, under the direction of the
Students' Christian association. The
camp is located on the banks of the
Patterson, +Sales ,and Bass lakes, con-
sidered by officers in charge one of
the most ideal camp sites in the state.
It includes 170 acres where the boys
are instructed in nature studies, a
wooded area and excellent bathing
and swimming facilties in the three
lakes.
Staff Works Gratis
The leaders of the camp, including
15 University students spend their
summers with the boys without
charge. Their expenses, board and
room, are paid. In addition to these
leaders the camp isprovided with two
camp physicians, who are junior med-
ics in the University. -"Dad" Lock-
wood, of Tecumseh, a naturalist with
several trunks full of egg and but-
terfly collections-the work of a life-
time-, two Indians who teach the
boys basket weaving, and several boy
scout leaders make up the camping
party.
The camp will need several hun-
dred dollars more to complete the
season and the directors are contem-
plating a campaign for the purpose of
raising the money.
Annual Repairs Undertaken
Annual painting and general repairs
to campus buildings have been taken
in hand by the Buildings and Grounds
department and will continue through
the Summer session. In addition
$5,000 worth of equipment is being
installed and alterations made In the
physiology and pharmocology build-
ing.

60 Billion Quarts Ice Cream Used
New York, July 13-(By A.P.)-The
ice cream appetite runs to sixty bil-
lion quarts a year or more than ten
quarts per person according to a re-
port made by Commissioner Monahan'
today.

At 100 He Helps
Ypsi To Celebrate
Centennial Date

FRENCH EXTEN EOCCUPATION
TO TWO MOEGERMN' CITIE1
DISCUSS BALDWIN'S ANSWER

I I
The Rev, Seth Reed
The Rev. Seth Reed, Methodist min-
ister, himself a centenarian, was a
prominent figure at the Ypsilanti cen-
tennial celebration recently. He was
born the year the city was founded.
SEVENTY-FIVE 60
ON NiA.GARA1 TRIP.
Excursion, Headed by Prof. J. P. Rowe
Will Arrive at Des-tination
Tomorrow
GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS TO
BE POINTED OUT BY DIRECTORS
Seventy-five students accompanied
by Prof. J. P. Rowe, of the geology de-
partment, and by Russel C. Hussey,
also of the geology department, left,
yesterday for the annual excursion to
Niagara Falls. The trip will end to-
morrow morning.
In addition to this number of Sum-
mer session students there were many
local people and'others from Ypsilanti
who are also making the trip. The
total number of excursionists will be
more than 80, according to a statment
from the office of the Summer session.
The excursionists will visit all the
points of interest at the Falls, Goat
Island, The Maid of the Mist, and the
Gorge. The geological formations will
be pointed out by Professor Rowe and
his assistant.
' Roof Fire Loss $200
Chief Andrews said that the roof
fire yesterday caused Mrs. Margaret
McLeod of 1222 Washtenaw avenue
the loss of $200. Mrs. McLeod was,
burning a quantity of papers in the
open fireplace when sparks from the
chimney set fire to the roof.{
Governor of Caracus Named

ELBERFIELD, INDUSTRIAL CEN-
TER SEIZED BY TROOPS
AS PENALTY
KIDNAPING INCIDENT
CAUSE OF MOVE, BELIEF
Paris O ptimistic Over British Note;
Believe Understanding Pos-
sible
Berlin, July 13-(By A.P.)-
treme caution and pronounced
desire not to be brusque t France
or force her to show her hand
appears to have been the motive
which inspired the British Prime
Minister's statement in the House
of Commons yesterday according
to the view entertained in Ger-
man official headquarters where
the statement is lightly appraised
as a sympathetic utterance lead-
lug to an early and perhaps de-
cisive bearing on the Ruhr in-
tasse.
Duesseldorf, July 13-(By A.P.)-
French troops today made a surprise
raid on Bramen, outside of the oc-
cupied area as a -punitive measure
for kidnapping on Wednesday of two
French soldiers and snipig which
was alleged to have been carried on
by the Germans against the forces of
the occupation.
Companies of infantry and cavalry
with a squadron of' airplanes circling
overhead reached the town at 6o'-
clock this morning and left five hours
later with, a group of hostages and a
number of secret security policy doc-
uments seized at the city hall. The
French numbered about 600. They
encountered no opposition, but heavy
artillery had been stationed at the
Ruhr frontier turned upon the French
and ready for any French move.
The troops took as hostages, the
Director of the local Rech bank, the
burgomaster, the chief of police and
minor officials.
Duesseldorf, July 13.-While mem-
bers of the French cabinet today pon-
dered over Prime Minister Baldwin's
address in the house of commons yes-
terday, French troops entered and oc-
cupied the big industrial city of El-
berfield, on the edge of the Ruhr ,re-
gion.
The town of Limburg, just beyond
the Coblenz bridgehead, which the
Americans formerly held, was occu-
pied by French troops yesterday as a
permanent . occupation town. Bar-
men, in the Elberfield manufacturing
district, also was occupied by a de-
tachment of French troops.
Penalty for Disorders
The French official announcement
of the occupation does not give the
number of officials taken as hostages,
but it is understood the operations,
which were on a large scale, were un-
dertaken to impose a penalty for re-
cent frontier incidents.
Barmen is just outside the occupied
area and the frontier affairs culminat-
ed recently in one which involved the
security police near that town. Wed-
nesday, two French soldiers, following
some German smugglers, were sur-
rounded in the woods by a band of 15
of the security police the French
state.
Soldiers Kidnapped
The 'police seied the Frenchmen,
kidnaping them and taking them to
Elberfield, where they were questioned

Caracus, July 13.--(By A.P.)-Uen. and disarmed. Their armis finally were
Julie Hidalgo, formerly director of Ireturned to them without cartridgeq
telegraphs, has been named governor- and thly were taken to the frontier
of the federal district. (Continued on Page Four)

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iLAST )AY "HKSERA FSIA NOE IR0MISTETE

SATURI
RESERVED SEATS, 15c

DAY AFTERNOON, 3:30 o'clock, Shakespeare's "As You Like It."

SATURDAY NIGHT, at 8:15 o'clock, Shaw's "Candida."

GENERAL ADMISSION, 50c

0

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