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July 13, 1923 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1923-07-13

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ASSOCIATEI
PRESS-

DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

x

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1923

PRICE FIVE

LINES
POLICY

iU

CAIN IS
LL

>OSAL ASKS FRANCE:
,CEASE OCCUPATION
urzon's Speech to Lords Voices
le Opinion as That Held by
Prime Minister
ndon, July 12-(By A.P.)-
t Britain has informed
ce and Italy that she is ready
ssume the responsibility of
ring the draft of a reply
e German reparations note.
reply will be submitted to
Powers- with tle' least pos-
delay in the hope that they
agree to its terms.
nouncement to this effect
made by Prilhe Minister
vin in a statement to the
e of Commons today on
; Britain's reparation policy.
on, July 12-(By A.P.)-,Prime
r Stanley Baldwin in the
of ICommions and Marquis Cur-
the House' of Lords to eager
:es made identical pronounce-
on the government's policy of
)aration problem. Mr. Bonar
d Mr. Lloyd George were there
'reniier Baldwin's announce-
as made, it being brief, taking
6 minutes for delivery and in
house was opposition or crit-
ffered, and the momentous dis-
was quickly ended.
win Moves From Passivism
question on everybody's lips
the government was disappro-
he French-Ruhr policy and its
aloof from them whether it
be converted into an active
separate from France's policy
a great extent unanswered.
r Baldwin surely moved quite

EDITORIAL
SALASKA AND THE EAST
The conflict which precluded the
prompt settlement of our Federal gov-
ernment at the close of the Ravolu-
tion is again the issue which promises
to present itself in any action which
may be taken toward acknowledging
statehood to the Alaskan territory.
Students of American history will well
remember thestruggles between the
large and small states of the Confed-
eration between 1783 and 1789 when*
the problem of representation in the
national government rwas the chief
stumbling block before the various
congrsses which met to formulate a
constitution.
Now, as Alaska, the great northern
expanse of rich mines and extensive
fisheries, with its 60,000 population
seeks admission into the Union, rumbl-
es of dissatisfaction can be distinctly
heard. Making their way from the
East, these premonitions of the strug
gle still to come represent, naturally
enough the sentiments of states whose
population exceeds several million,
sections of the country who already
feel themselves inadeuately repre-
sented in the primary legislative body
of the land.
New York and Pennsylvania have a
combined population over thirty-five;
times as great as that of Alaska, while1
their combined representation in thej
Senate would be only double that of+
the unadmitted territory. It is not
surprisiig then that they should look
with disapproval upon the annexation+
of any such new state, but are theyI
entirely justified? The wealth of Al-,
aska is tremendous. Her -contribution
to the resources of the country annu-
ally mounts high into the millions.A
Financially she is one of our greatestI
assets.
Conceding the fact that establishingF
a complete organization of state gov-
ernment for so small a citizenship
would incur an expense whdily out of1
proportion with the benefits it mightJ
bring upon' the residents of the pro-J
viuge, the incentive for further ex-J
ploitation of the resources of that sec-{
tion rests inr- io small measure upon
its admission to .the Unio. Even the
over-populated sections of the East
must recognize that fact.
MORE DISMISSALS
With the Amherst situation still in
the foreground, and the Kentucky' Ev-
olution fight not yet in the dim past,
the news of the dismissal of seven
teachers by the Board of Trustees ofI
the University of Tennessee has a
greater significance than it would or-
dinarily. Lack of harmony between
the ideas of faculty members and 'the
governing boards again seems to'be
the root of the trouble. Apparently it
has not occured to the trustees that
their ideas may be archaic .
Instead of hearing that "nothing
can force the re-election of professorsI
'out of harmony with the policies of
the governing body" public-spirited+
citizens should demand an investiga-
tion of these "policies." Thirteen stu-
dents have already expressed their
disapproval of the action of their ad-
ministrative officers by expressing
their intention to withdraw from the
university unless their professors be
reinstated. To be sure their with-
drdwal will not work any harm upon
Tennessee as an institution but it will
effect the source of knowledge from
which these young people gain their
education in the future. They will go

to some institution where modern
ideas, even slightly progressive ones,
are not thwarted by omniscient trus-
tees,
Without explanation, wholesale dis-
missals of members of faculties should°
not be tolerated. What can we lookl
forward to if such policies are long1
continued in American universities?

SHAKESPEARE AST
THIUMPHS IN DRAMA
JEROME'S "PASSING OF THE
THIRD STORY BACK" TO BE
GIVEN TONIGHT
MC ENTEE, KEARNS, AND
OPERTI A R E FAVORITES
New York. Company Renews Favor-
able Impression Created in Last
Appearance
By Rosalie Frenger
A bower of trees with overhanging
branches and banks of cedar formed
the stage on which Frank McEntee
and his company 'from the Shakes-
peare Playhouse in New York City
capably presented "The Merchant of
Venice," last night in the Campus
open air theater.
Frank McEnttee who played Shy-
lock was an actor with the original
Ben Greet players. His portrayal of
the character of the avaricious mon-
ey-lender with the sudden change of
moods, showing in turn the wisdom
and suffering and the cunning which
he was forced to acquire was uni-
formly good and he carries his, audi-
ence with him. After he had spoken
only' a doen lines..
Elsie Herndon Kearns having play-
ed with Walter Hampden in addition
to having been head of a company oft
her own for vseveial years took the
part of Portia. Miss Kearns showedt
amazing versatility in turning from
the Jsweet, gentle, 'unlessoned' girl tox
the decorous young doctor. -
'Nerissa, Portia's maid was played
ably by Frances Homes, who was an
excellent contrast to Portia.
Le ltoi Operti lost himself entirely
m the part of Launcelot Gobbo and
kept the audience laughing. Whilef
Launcelot is a comedy character, thet
part is not light and ,great credit ist
due Mr. Operti for his spontaneity.f
Harry Neville, an Australian actorI
who has had wide experience in bothI
Shakespearian and m.odern plays in
all parts of the world played Old Gob-
bo, Launcelot's father. He was very
good in his consistent helpessness and
bewilderment and amusing obedience
to his son. -
Henry Buckler was the noble An-
tonio. He played the part of the
Merchant of Venice feelingly and
showed his suffering by his restraint.
EXCURSIOISTS TO TOUR
ADD1ING MACHINE P"LNTf
Student excursionists will tour the
Burroughs Adding Machine company's
plant and the new General Motors
office building in Detroit next Satur- .
day. They will leave Ann Arbor at,
8 o'clock, spend the morning in. the
Burroughs plant, lunch as. guests ofi
the company and then proceed to tle
office building where they will finish
the tour at 3 o'clock.
At the Burroughs plant manufac-
ture and assembling of the delicate
parts of an adding machine will be
demonstrated to the excrsionists and
a guide will be furnished for th. trip
through the General Motors building,
said to be the largest office building

in the world.
Casualties Heavy in Revolution
Buenos Aires, July 12.-Revolution-
ists attacked Ascuncion, capitol of Par-
-aguay at noon Monday, and were re-
pulsed by government troops. Seven-
ty were killed and 100 wounded in the
fighting.

DEAN BATES TO LEV
FOR, BRITISH COLUMBI
Prof. Henry Moore Bates, dean of
the Law school, will leave soon for
British Columbia where he will at-
tend a joint meeting of the Washing-
ton State and British Columbia Bar
associations, which will be held in
Vancouver on Aug. 2 and 3. Dean
Bates is scheduled to talk before the
associations and he will have for his
subject, "The Re-statement, Simplifica-
tion and Clarification of the Law."
While there Dean Bates will also at-
tend a dinner given by the Seattle
alumni of the University of Michigan.'
MFIHIAN FACES 8

EXPLAIN PROVISIONS OF
GEIAN REPARATIONS'
SETTLEMENT
POINTS FORMING BASIS
OF ADDRESS ON RUHR,
Declares Public Opinion Rules Forc-
ing Administrators to Seek
Physical Protection
The following is a summary of Pro-
fessor T. H. Reed's speech on "French
Politics and Reparations", in which
he declares that he does ,not pretend
to speak as an expert in international

GERMANS .HAVE MADE
TEMPT TO PAY REPARA
AS AGREED

0.

REED DEFENDS RUHRI INVASION
ON GROUNDS OF "NATIONALISM AND
FALURfE OF GRMNY TO PA

URGES ARBITRATION
WAY TO PREVENT V

£

Interest Centers on Annual 0. S.
Battle, Minnesota, and U. S.
Marines

Uj law but only in an attempt to show
the American public the attitude of
the French at the present time.

>ly away from Mr. Bonar
>licy of passivism-.
No Indication of Reply
I not give the slightest indi-
f the nature of the proposed
This was the only important
he announcement. If the re-
was a warning couched in
t friendly language and par-
coming' from the British
ent could not much longer re-
passive spectator to i policy
hreatened the economic life
any and with it disaster to

SEASONS OPENS OCTOBER 6
WHEN CASE MEETS WOLVERINES
With the adoption of the eight game
football schedule by the Western Con-
ference at its last meeting, the Uni-'
versity of Michigan football team will
play eight games this year in place
of the usual seven, for 'the first time
since 1905.
The Case school team of Cleveland,
which has held the lead off positionni
on the Michigan schedule for the past
25 years and which can be counted on
to always furnish an exciting after-
noon, will again be the first team to
meet the Wolverines, coming to Ferry
field on Oct. 6.
U. S. Marine Gdame Nov. 10
Up until this.yearfMichigan has
never had but two reserve seat games,
however, the schedule this year' in-
cludes two other games that will be
featured on the Michigan card and as
the seat demand has become so great,
it was decided to raise the number to
four reserve games. Ohio State and
Minnesota, Conference games, will
be the features of the schedule, while
Vanderbilt, this year's conquerors of
the south, and the United States Mar-
ines will hold the other two honor
positions.
The United States Marine game pro-
nises to be a gala day for service men
of all branches. The team will be ac-
companied to Ann Arbor by Secretary
of the Navy Edwin Denby, who is a
former Michigan football star, the
famous marine band of 300 pieces and
about 1,500 service men.
0. S. U. Reserves 7,500 Seats
As is the usual case, Ohio State
will draw a big crowd and the' Ohio
athletic authorities have already re-
served 7,500 seats for their followers
at this game. This number is second
only to the record breaking crowd of
15,000 Michigan supporters which
followed the Wolverines to Ohio last
October to dedicate the Ohio stadium.
The Michigan football schedule for
this fall is as' follows:
Oct. 6-Case Scientific school at Ann
Arbor.
Oct. 13-Vanderbilt university at
Ann Arbor.
Oct. 20-Ohio State at Ann Arbor.
Oct. 27-M. A. C. at An nArbor.
Nov. 10-U. S. marines at Ann Ar-
bor.
Nov. 3-University of Iowa at Iowa
City.
Nov. 17-University of Wisconsin at
Madison.
Novi 24-University of Minnesota at
Ann Arbor.
Italian Statesman Dead
Milan, July 12.-(By A. P.)-Alfred
Comandini member of Orlando's war
cabinnet, is dead.

((1) It was understood from Pres-
ident Harding and Lloyd George that
there would be no attempt to punish
Germany, explained Professor Reed,
and the following terms of the peace
treaty were made: (a) Germany to
pay for damages done on land and
sea and to persons and property dur-
ing the -war; (b) A commission in-
cluding Great Britain, the United
States, France and Italy in most cas-
es and a representative of Japan 'a
few times, was to enforce repara-
tions; (c) The Povyers should act to-
gether on certain international ques-
tions. The Reparations Commission
fixed the amount to be paid by Ger-
many at $38,000,000,000 but Professor
Reed pointed out, "Germany has nev-
er come to time. There has been no
serious attempt on the part of Ger-
many to meet the conditions set forth
by the Reparations commission. .
"Public Opinion," said Professor
Reed,'"rules in France as it does here.
and the opinion of the French people
may be explained in their hope that
they may not be made 'the victim of
another invasion. The Frenchman
realizes Germany's strength. He is
aware of the fact, that he sits close
to the. German, and the only way ,of
,insuring himself is through some
form of physical protection.
"The French nation will be bank-
rupt if Germany does not pay.
"The spirit of nationalism is strong-
er in every nation 'than ever before.
SEVENTY FIVE WILL TKE
.TRIP TO NIAGARFALLS
Seventy-five students will leave
from the city of Ann Arbor this aft-
erndon en route to Niagara Falls..
Prof. J. P. Rowe, of the University of
Montana, who is in charge of the ex-
cursion, announces that the special
car provided for the occasion will be
at Packard and State streets precisely
at 2:05 o'clock. On arriving in De-
troit the party will be conveyed to
the dock by street car. The steamer
leaves the Detroit dock at 5:30 o'-
clock according to schedule.
The customary excursion to the
Falls proves extremely. popular this
year; there are 20 more excursionists
this year than last.
The excursionists will arrive in De-
troit at 9 o'clock Monday morning.
As' no special car has been arranged
for the return trip to Ann Arbor,
those who desire to reach the. city
Monday forenoon can take a 9:50 ex-
press from the interurban station,
Detroit, which arrives in Ann Arbor
about noon.

Says France, Abandoned by Allies Has
Taken Only Means to Insure
Salvation'
In an eloquent and spirited address
before a Summer session audience
which tilled Natural Science auditor-
ium, Prof. Thomas A. Reed, of the
political science department, yester-
day afternoon delivered an appeal for
the French stand in the Ruhr occu-
pation. .
Advocates Arbitration
'His address was an uncompromised
defense of the French although he ad-
mitted that "There will be no peach
in the world until a body is set up.
which has the power to 'settle intera
national difficulties without the force
of arms." This attitude, conflicting
in spirit with the Ruhr occupation,
brought a round..of applause from his
audience indicating the attitude of
his listepers .toward the use of arbi-
tration in international difficulties,
Professor Reed's defense of France
was based upon a justification of the
wave of nationalism which has swept
that country'since the election of 1919
when the republican forces over-
whelmed the parties tendxing toward
radicalism and upon what he .deems
the "defau"lt" of Germany in ndt pay
ing, or "attempting to pay" the re-
parations levied upon her.
Germany Has Not' Tried
"Germany has never paid," said the
speaker, "or at least has never inade
a serious attempt to pay the repara-.
tions imposed upon her by the com-
mission. Belgium, France and Ialy
have declared her so and in view of
this default the French have levied ex-
ecution upon her. They have seized
the Ruhr, the industrial heart of' the
German republic and they are grad-
ually increasing the pressure upon
'this vital organ in the 'hope that the
pronised reparations may be fora-
coming. "There are critics both in
this country and on the continent, 'ho
oppose the action of the French in in-
vading and occupying German terri-
tory, on economic and political and
moral grounds. The question is put,
'Can Germany pay?' The British be-
lieve, as do many critics in this coun--
try, that a restoration of normal trade
relations is necessary before Germany
can be judged on this count. The sale
of German goods abroad will hel* the
situation, and it is true that therd are
obstructions to the disposal of Per-
man goods, obstructions which the na-
tions that should be interested have
neglected to remove. But aside from
these phases of the problem, one fact
is eminently obvious to the French-
Germany has not tried to pay!
France Stkred by Nationalism.
At this point the speaker returned
to a defense of the French and did
not again allude to the possibility of
justification in the German stand in
the problem.
"The present regime supports Poin-
caire, nationalism and the mainten-
ance of a strong army as a result of
the election of 1919. The French are
'unanimous in one opinion-or per-
haps I should call it a desire and a
hope that they shall not again be in-
vaded and devastated. Nationalism
is stronger in France today, and in
every country in the world, then ever
4 (Continued on Page Four)

w
k;

e of Europe. -
as a whole, the pronounce-
med to be an invitation for
o retreat her steps and come
,ith all the allies in a new
settle the reparations prob-
egotiations instead of by mil-
alty. The Premier was most
He avoided any shutting of
of any pos'sible negotiation.
KNOCKS -WILLAR
r IN EIGHT ROUNDS
Willard, former heavyweight
ion of the world was knock-
by Louis Firpo of South
a, in the eighth round of
the most thrilling battles
een in the history of fight.
80,000 people witnessed the
rhich took place in Jersey

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SHAKESPEARE PLAYHOUSE, OF NEW YORK
Presents in Open Air Campus Theatre, at POPULAR PRICES:

o

FRIDAY NIGHT, July 13th, 8:15 o'clock, Jerome's "The Passing of the Third Floor Back."
t, SATURDAY AFTERNOON, July 14th, 3:30 o'clock, Shakespeare's "As You Like It."
SELA TS s Cta-, SATURDAY NIGHT, at 8:15 o'clock, Shaw's "Candida." I o-.I Adm.so

lax-

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