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July 10, 1923 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-10

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-.+

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

',

ication
-ersity.

in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
Copy received in the Office of the Summer Session until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday.)
TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1923 Number 195

8

1
s Educational Club:
The Men's Educational Club will meet Tuesday evening, July 10, at 7
ck at the Michigan Union. Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Graduate'
ol, and Dean Edward H. Kraus of the Suminer Session will speak at
meeting. GEORGE E. MYERS.
iam L. Clements Library of American History:'
The date of opening the Library has necessarily been postponed for a
f time. Notice will be given in the Official Bulletin as soon as the Lib-
is in condition to be opened for inspection and study.
WM. W. BISHOP, Librarian.
aria Falls Excusion:
Those who paid for staterooms last week may secure the tickets by
ng at Room G223, Natural Science Building. Office hourse, 9-11 A. M.,
3-5 P. M. J. P. ROWE.
ursion No. 4
Belle Isle and the Detroit River, will be the destination of the party
ig the excursion Wednesday, July 11, leaving the Packard and State
ets station at 1 P. M. Those whro cannot conveniently bring picnic
hes may secure good meals at the Belle Isle Casino.
LTON WELLS, Director of Ex CARLTON WELLS,
Director of Excursions.

WHAT'S GOING ON'
TUESDAY
:15-Indoor baseball, south Ferry:
field; faculty vs. principals, sup-
erintendents vs. teachers.
:00-Lecture, "The Status of Evolu
tion". Professor A. F. Shull.
:00 feeting of the Men's Educa-
tional Club in the Library room of
le Union.
:00-Lecture, "The Eect of Poison-
ous Gases on the Luings". Profes-
sor L. M. Warfield.
WEDNESDAY
:00-Excursion No. 4. Belle Isle and
the Detroit River. Trip ends at
6:30 P. M.
:00-Lecture, "What is a Good
Book?" Professor T. E. Rankin.
:00-Concert. Faculty of the Univer-
sity School of Music. (Hill Audi-
torium.)

Heads

Americau

Zionist

Society

STATE DEEDS TRACTS OF
LAD 0TO UNIYERSITY
Two tracts of land, one of 80 acres
and the other of 160 acres have been
deeded to the University by the state
conservation department according
to word received here 'from that de-
partment recently. The tracts of land
,re in Aetna township, in Misaukee
county, closely adjoining the Univer-
sity preserve there.
The gift is of great importance to
the Unversity according to Prof. A.
G. Ruthven, director of the museum,
in that the property is thought to be
rich in Indian relics and remains of
an early civilization. It will defin
itely open vyide the fields of research
in the early history of the civilization,
a work which is being carried on now
by the Museum, but which is some-
what hampered by the lack of room
in which to do it. Now however the
tracts will be carefully guarded and
worked by experts from the faculty,
And it is expected that valuable relics
will be found. It is also thought pos-
sfble to convert the property'into pre-
serves for wild birds and rare animals.
XCUHRIONISTS TO SEE
DETROIT'S_ N PRK
When the excursionists go to Belle
Isle on the afternioon of Wednesday,
July 11, they will, enjoy a combination
of picnic-outing and sightseeing. At
3 o'clock, immediately after the party's
arryval at Woodward avenue, Detroit,,
the Belle Isle boat will be boarded
for the trip up to'the island park.
This ride will give the students a
view of Detroit's sky-line hnd the
Canadian 'side of the river.
At.the island the University students
will walk along. the wooded boule-
vards and the picturesque lagoons,
visiting the Casino, where lunch will
be secured for those not bringing
their picnic supper, the botanical gar-'
dens where) tropical plants and tree,
are produced under torrid zone con-
ditions, the acquarium of Michigan
and sea fishes, the zoo and apiary, and
other ponts of interest. For those
who wish to walk further, the only
complete municipal golf links may be
viewed; and toward the upper end of
the island the more densely wooded
areas may be observed. Toward the
Detroit side the half-completed Belle
Isle bridge is under construction, not
far from the bathing beach.
After supper on the island, the 7
o'clock boat will be taken back to
Woodward avenue, in time to board
the jnterurban which reaches Ann Ar-
bor about 945 o'clock. Names of those
planning to take this excursion should
be received at the Summer session of-
fice by 6 o'clock tonight.
JUSTICE DAY,5'70, DIES
AT MAKINACjISLAD
(Continued from Page One)
19 years, had greatly impaired his
health.
Justice Day never enjoyed good
health. Of a frail physique, he never
impressed one as being robust.
Son and Grandson Students here
William Day, '26E, is a grandson
of Justice Day. His son also attend-
ed Michigan, graduating in 1900.

Mackinac Island, Michigan, July 9.
-(By A.P.)-Tbe body of former
United States Suprene Court Justice,
William R. Day, who died here at
5:30 o'clock this morning was taken
late today to Canton, Ohio. William
L. Day of Cleveland, a son, accon-
panied the body.
The funeral party expect to arrive
at Canton on Tuesday and burial will
be there.
The 'former Justice has been ill for
about 10 days and several (lays, ago
physicians gave up hope for his re-
covery. Mr. Day's left lung was said
to have been seriously affected and
the right one slightly so. Mr. Day
had been living "on his nerves", ac-
cording to his physician, for the last1
few years, believing he must do his
part in public affair's despite his ad-
vanced age. He was conscious until,
a few minutes before he died. For
more than forty years Mr. Day had
spent his summers here. He was be-
loved by the entire community ' be-
cause of his democracy and was fa-
miliarly known to all residents here
from hotel owners to bootblacks.

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First Football
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ERVICE ON REQUEt
0NE 165

In the second place Turkey, by her
re-entry into eastern Thrace, comes
back into Europe.
France, on the question of the Ot-
toman debt which she wanted put
into the treaty to conserve the rights
of her numerous bandholders, made
a sacrifice in order to hold fast Great
Britain and Italy on the near eastern
problems and to attain peace.
As -the pact now stands it contains'
no reference to Turkey's debt, but the
allies will declare that the debt con-
tract cannot be modified except by
mutual agreEment between Turkey and
the bondholders, with whom she must

this summer.

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your patronage.
TUTTLES' LUNCH
Maynard Stree

WE WISH to a
to the gener
that we are keep

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i

Coaches Zuppke, left, and Gilnur
Dobie, talking foolbildi
Gridiron Coaches Bob Zuppke of Il-
linois, and Gilmour Dobie, of Cornell
are talking football to about 400 stu-
dents in the summer course for coach-f
es at the University of Illinois. They
might be up in the mountains or far,
in the cool woods but prefer this way i
of spending the summer.
BELIEVE LAUSANNE PARLEY
TO BRING PEACE IN 10 DAYS,
(Continued from Page One)
capitulations, a step which it took
Japanese long years to accomplish.

MVACATION

really cosiskts ih a chahge of Work. 'WiQle you sire taking
youir V~catioh is a good titeto cleah up around the hkoe
ah'd t i h up~ some of, the Worh spot~sWith BoydeI'Paitst.
Kiere . a good way to tmake tnohey by saVihg While y-u res.
e l~aVe eVerytkin here you'll need. Boydel Paiht is the
SCHLENKER'S HARDWARE
213 WEST LI!3~kTY

i

B00K ARVOAII

THURSDAY
5:00-Lecture, "French Politics
Reparations." Professor T.

and
H.

8:15 - Open Air Performance of
Shakespeare's "The Merchant of
Venice." (Campus theater.) Ad--
mission will be charged.
FRIDAY
2:05-Excursion No. 5. Niagaila Falls
and vicinity. Under the direction of
Prof. J. P. Rowe, of the University
of Montana. Return early July 15.
SATURDAY
5:00-Lecture, "Our Transportation
Problem from the Highway View-
point." (Illustrated.) Professorl
A. H. Blanchard.
8:,00-Open Air Performance of Eu-
gene O'Neill's "Beyond . the Hori-
-zon". The Shakespeare Playhouse
of New York City. (Campus thea-
ter.) Admission will be charged.
i:00 A. M.-Excursion No. 6. Bur-1
roughs Adding Machine Company,
and the General Motors Office Build-
ing. Trjp ends at 3 p. m.
3:30 P. .-Open Air Performance of
Shakespeare's "As You Like It'""
The Shakespeare Plsayhouse com-
pany of New York City. (Campus
theater.) Admission will be charg-
ed.
8:15 - Open Air Performance of
George Bernard Shaw's "Candida".
The Shakespeare Pla'yhouse com-
pany of New York City. (Qampus
theater.) Admission will be charg-
ed.
Exchange, Notes
Indiana-The Indiana University
Law school, the second oldest law
school in the United States, establish-
ed in 1842, celebrated Its 81st anni-
versary this year.
Illinois-,The University of Illinois
annouices that 2071 students have
registered for summer school. This
is ,about 60 less than the enrollment
last year.
Hiarvard-Gifts amounting to more
than four and a half million dollars
were donated 'to Harvard university
during the last year.

IIss Henrietta Sozid
Miss Henrietta Szold is the leader
of the Zionist women in Amierica, who
recently held a conference in Balti-
more. The Zionist women's organiza-£
tion is the auxiliary of the Zionist
movement which aims to effect the re-
storatioi cf Palestine as the Jewish.
homeland.
Miss Szold was horn and educated in
Baltimore and has been a teacher but
has devoted her life largely to editor-
ial work. She is the translater of
"Jewish Ethics," by Lazarus, "Legends
of the Jews," by Ginzberg, "Hebrew
Rennaissance," by N. Slouschz, and
other works. From 1904 to 1908 she
was the editor of the American Jew-

Summer School Teachers' and Students' attention is called to our mid-summer
BARG AIN COUNTER
Of Text Books on all subjects, Reference Books, etc., etc.
An opportunity to strengthen your library.
'WAHR S UNIVE R.SITY
BOOK STORE

tA WORLD CONVENTION ON BUSINE-SS PROM9TI,

ish Year book of the Jewish
tion Society.

Publica-

SHULL TO lECTUR E ON
STTSOF EVOLUTION
Prof. A. F. Shull, of the zoology
department, will lecture on the "Stat-
us of Evolution" at 5 o'clock this af-
ternoon, Dr. Shull has written sev-
eral text books on animal biology
which are used in the zoology depart-
ment of the University, and he has
published numerous articles on here-
dity and evolution.
At 8 o'clock tomorrow evening Prof.
L. M. Warfield will lecture on the
"Effects of Poisonous Gases on the
Lungs". Both lectures will be given
in the auditorium of the Natural
Science building.
MEEK DECL ARES TEACHERS
SHOULD AID SUPERVISORS
(Continued from Page One)
the experience that is theirs. When
you have such teachers," Mr. Meelt
said, "you have a class of people in
which it is perfectly safe to lodge au-
thority. Any superintendent would .be
glad to confer with all of them, and
they could learn from each other's
experience.
"That is the ideal system," the
speaker concluded, "where every
heart and every soul is in to serve".
Patronize The Iaily advertisers.

Three Factories
that Advertisingi
Built

N
- N

- '

I

A business man recently visiting iq an Iowa city asked a
banker friend who showed him the town the secret of the
prosperity of three factories which had grown rapidly. "We
have an advertising club here," the banker said, "and through
an exchange of information in the club, and at State and
National advertising conventions, the owners of those fac-
tories, each of whom started with little capital, learned how
to establish demand for their products -and we all know
that the finding of markets is the real problem of business.
These factories have learned to advertise with profit."
The business man who does not know the business-build-
ing power of well-planned 'advertising lacks knowledge
which would be df great profit to him. And every forward-
looking business executive should attend the
NINETEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION
ASSOCIATED ADVERTISING CLUBS of the WORLD
Atlantic City, June 3 to 7, 1923

~
I , . .
J
r t
'r r. r

Membership in the Association
is not essential to attendance.
Five thousand minds will meet
there, and there will be more than'
'thirty departmental meetings, for
the close.-up study of advertising in
various lines of business and in
various advertising mediums.
In addition to the sessions of
the convention, loaded full of busi-
ness-building ideas, there will be a
great educational exhibit of adver.
tising. Take a note book with you..

You will go backhome enriched.
Share with us the joy of June in
Atlantic City. What a delightful
Place it is in that delicious monthI
Ample hotel accommodations at
reasonable, guaranteed rates, ad
mirable transportation facilities,
special railroad rates-a great busi-
ness opportunity and a chance
to spend some most enjoyable.
days at a cost less than the usual
expense of going to his Queen of
Resorts.

r

Share with. us thej
Tun~e in Atlantic(

f

uidents Supp
1111 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVER

Store

For full information as to special railroad rates, hotels, etc., address:
ASSOCIATED ADVERTISING CLUBS

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