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July 10, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-10

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nmu r

W; P';ROBABLY
WERS TOD~AY

Siir. i an_

Balip

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY ANTD N IGHI
SERVICE

No. 15

ANN ARBOR; MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1923.

PRICE

LA USANNE

F

WILL BRING

T PASHA CENTRAL FIGURE
IN NEAR EAST CON-
FERENCE
tKEYWINS VICTORIES;
NCH SACRIFICE HOLD
e and Ottoman Agree to CloseI
Hostilities; Believe Danger
Averted
ssanne, July 9.-(By A.P.) -j
Pasha has proved himself a.
diplomat for by the near easternj
which was arranged in principle
en the allied and Turkish repre-
;ives early today he achieved
Ivictories for his country.
never relinquished his grasp on
lelicate situations which 'often
anted the conference. He was
than the British Marquis Cur-I
i the first stage of the negotia-
and kept all from the start. He
I always, but seldom, if ever,
yield. .
Angora governn'tent, still must
nsulted, on several points con-
.g allied concessions in Turkey,
verybody at Lausanne. believes
eace surely will be signed with-
days.
Pasha Ruling Figurej
great result of the Lausanne
conference as seen by the diplo-
here, is that one of the" most
s dangers to the happiness of
ontinent has been removed by
iuidation of the state of war in
ar east and by the agreement of
y and Greece to lay down their
at last., European' troops will
ite Turkish soil and . Turkey,
.er new type of government, will
e to fashion her destiny unfetter-
Europeani domination.
ace! Peace! Tell it to the whole
se were the words of the Turk-
Ader as he emerged from the
ence hall. Champagne was
at the delegation hotels 'to
ate the success of the negotia-
which began last November, only
interrupted 'in February by a
Jonal collapse over questions
this morning were settled.
Turkey Wins Viktoriek
key won a succession of victor-j
'oughout the conference. In the
Continued on Page Four)

EDITORI AL
A TRIBUIE
With the passing of Will jam fit
Day. '70, Michigan loses owt. of i s
rntc renowAe'l and respe%: ' alumni.
ii iely known as a statomr: j.ian. r-
fit, the former Secr'ar %- L -
* .a uf the ~o1t?1iandiprg fim in- thl
. oloiiaic struggle wh pIc led
a.a d flov,,u the war ww.1 I's in in
and tnt, Treaty o Varis -xieh
ci ted the r.gle stais . c SI.' u
i .t to laim who drat'te, '11o or i11:t
:ln,. ilent.
As asss iate justice of the Supreic
Court he was respected by his col-
lgagues as one of the most valuable
and influential members of that court.
When he resigned his position on the
bench, his associates paid the follow-
ing tribute to their fgllow juror:
"We shall miss yoir loyalty to the
court and its traditions, your affec-
tionate fellowship, your wit and iu-
mourand your unfailing tranquility
and good sense." '
In all of his associations with t'.
University, Mrfl. Day was in the high-.
est sense, a mighty Man of Michigan.
Loyalty to this his Alma Mater, and
a love for its traditions were alWvay
before him. Lives 'such as his bring
only credit and honor upon us.
A TRANSPLANTING JOB
Virtually transplanting a French.
university to this sidep of the Atlantic,
the summer session of Columbia uni-
versity has achieved another 'great

JUSTICE DAY, "7-0,
DIES AT MAC KINA C
SU ,MER HOME

Opposes U. S.
Liquor

Stand

WAS MiClilGAN GRAl A TE
ASSOVI ATE SUPrIEME
JUST t E

AN)

iI

Woolen Workers
Threaten Strike

£ PLANS
TY fRIDA

accomplishment in the institution of a
complete course in French civilization.
This new venture'has been inaugurat-
ed for the benefit of men and women,
who, although aspiring to a complete
knowledge of French history, civil-
ization, and thought, as well as a
speaking'knowledge of 'the language,
cannot afford to travel abroad to se-
cure such training.
Among the men numbered in the
facualty presenting this (course, we
find such men as Joseph Bedier, a
member of the French academy, and
professors in the famous universities
at Paris and Grenoble. The intention
is to present a course corresponding
to that initiated at the University of
Paris at the close of the Great war for
the special isetruction of American
soldiers. It would include instruction
in the relationship between 'French,
American and Continental literary'
movements, their sociolgical rela-
tionships, and the contemporary phil-
osophica movements of France. Aside
from these courses in this history and
traditions of France are also included.
The bringing of great foreign men
of letters to an American university
in such numbers for the presentation
of a single course illustrates the fu-
ture which summer sessions will oc-
cupy in this country. More than 1,000
courses have been announced for the.
current season at Columbia and indi-
cations show that between 12,000 and
15,006 students will attend. Such
figures illustrate the development of
summer education at Columbia in- 24
years. What the extent of future ex-
pansion in this field will be is hard
to forecast, but the fact that many
schools who hitherto ignored this
comparatively new Institution foT
learning have created such branches
in theirannual curricula gives proof
of its increasing popularity.
Financial obstacl.s have 1been over-
come, France has been brought to
America. The time o courses has
been minimized so that almost anyone
can if (suflAciently ambitious, avail
themwelves of six or eight weeks of
cultural training during the summer.
months. Certainly if anything well
elevate the people if America to a
higher level of intelligence, this is one
way. .

TOOK PROMINENT PART
IN SPANISH WAR PARLEY
Ieatih Result of General. Breakdown
Following BronchItis; Was 74
Years of Age
William R. Day, '70, former asso-
ciate justice of the{ United States su-1
preme court, died early yesterday
inorn:ng at Mackinac Island, Mich.
Death was caused by a general break-
down following an attack of bronchit-
is last fall. The body will be taken
to Canton, O., for burial.:
.Mr. I)ay went to Mackinac Island
VO weks ago, t ~fud the summer
nants ai jils s'mrner home there.,
Th niain attraction of the place for
him was. its quiet and restfulness,
whic L always benefited him.
William R. Day was- born in Ohio
in 1849. He attended the University,
graduating in 1870. Since that time
he has been one of the most prom-'
inent and, interested alumni of the
University. -
Prominent Under McKinley
In 1896, when McKinley was elect-
ed President, he appointed Day as-
sistant secretary of State. Due to the
age of John Sherman, secretary of
state at that time, Day was forced to
carry most of the burdens of office.
He did much in trying to avert war
with Spain over Cuba, and after the
war was a member of the peace com-
mission, drafting the treaty. Iis work
in the Treaty of Paris will be remem-
bered in the annals of diplomatic ser-
vice.
With this duty over President Mc-
inley named him a circuit judge of
the United States for the Sixth dist-
rict. Here he served until President
Roosevelt appointed him to the bench
of the supreme court of the United
States in 1903.
He resigned the suprame court po-"
sition Nov. 14, 1922, to become um-
pire of the mixed claims commission
appointed to settle claims arising
from the war. He resigned on May 5
last after it had developed that the ac-
tivities and requirements of the bench
where he had worked tirelessly for"
(Continued on Page Four)
INDINS TACHBOYS
BASIT WEAVI AT

British house of commons, has intro-
duced a bill in that body providing
that no ships be admitted to English
ports unless carrying liquor for pas-
sengers and crew. This measure is
aimed as retalition for United btates
dry rulings.
Declare McEntee Has Procured Able
Group of Actors for Program,
Here
COMPANY WAS FAVORABL.
RECEIVE 1) HERE LAST TEAR
(By Rosalie Frenger),
The open air performances of plays
which will be given this on the cam-
pus by Mrt Frank McEntee and his
company from the Shakepeare Play-
house in New York, have aroused thy.
interest of dramatic and Shakesper-
ean authorities here.
Since the founding of The Shakes-
pearePlayhouse in 1918, Mr. McEntee
has gathered about him an excellent
group of actors, according to critics
here, and the company under his lead-
ership has an enviable record. This
company's production of Shakespear-
ean and modern dramas has received
very favorable notice both in New
York and by various university public-
ations throughout the country
McEntee himself is in the front
rank of American actors, and he comes
to Ann Arbor ably supported by a
strong cast comprising such well
known artists as Elsie Herndon
Kearns, who acts with Walter Hamp-
ton, Gertrude Linnell, Harry. Neeille,
P. J. Kelly, Le Roi Operti, and oth-
ers of similar talent.
Mr, McEntee's company gave sev-
eral performances here last summer
and is being brought here by the Eng-
lish department. Critics claim that
last year's performances, due to the
superior quality of the actors was
one of the greatest dramatic essays.
seen in Ann Arbor in the last 15
years.
I1ARDING REETS ITIZENS OF
WRANGEILL IN ALASKA
Wrangell, Alaska, July 9-(By A.
P.)-President Harding landing hee
today greeted thousands of people of
Wrangell and Petersburg and in an
address elivered from the steps of the
Court House he deplared he came to
Alaska "as an apostle of understand-
ing" . and wanted his administration
to go down in history as "a period of
understanding".

;

Colonel Courthope
Colonel Courthope, member

of the

New York, July 9.-(By A.P.)- A
thousand members of the cloth exam-
iners and spongers union who pass
upon 90,per cent of the woolens used
in men's and women's clothing man-
ufacturing plants in the United States
have announced ,they will strike there
next Monday unless they are granted.
an increase of 25 to 30 per cent on
piece work, Edward Fillmore, paresi-
dent of the Textile lAssociation of
Employers revealed tonight. Mr. Fill-
more predicted that within 24 hours
after the strike of the clothing tradc
in New York City and in many ohe.
cities extending to the Pacific coast
would be shut down and" that 500,00&G
men and women would be out of work._
AIRMAN'S "BODY,
Believe Balloon Was Caught in Storm
of Thursday Night; Body
Sent to Cleveland
FOUND AFLOAT IN BASKET
OF ILL-FATED U. S. AIRCRAFT
Port Stanley, Ont., July 9-(By A.
P.)-Lake Erie today yielded up- the
body of Lieut. L. J. Ross, pilot of the
ill-fated U. S. Navy Balloon 'A-6698.
Strapped to the vacuum of the bal-
loon and clad only in his underwear
around which had been fastened a
life preserver, Ross' body was found
in. the basket this morning 14 miles
off here by Capt. George Wilson, mas-
ter of a fishing boat. Apparently
caught in the terrific storm of last
Thursday night, Lieutenant Ross evi-
dently took the precaution to strap
himself to the side of-the basket af-
ter divesting himself of his clothing
land then cutting .the basket loose
from the bag trusting to the buoyancy
devices with which the basket w'as
equipped to keep it afloat.,
Cleveland. Ohio, July 9-(By A.P.)
-The -body of Lieutenant Lewis J.
Ross, United States Navy, reached
Cleveland at 8:05 o'clock tonight
abroad the hydroplane "Nine" of the
Aero'nmarine Airways company. It
was in charge of Lieut. James H.
Strong, Inspector of Naval Aircraft at'
the Glen L. Martin company plant1

Jiere.

1i

MEEK DCCLI
AI S6uPER
TOLEDO EDUCATOR
MORE COOPERAT:
TWEEN bEPART:

SCORES PRYING A
AUTOCRATIC \
Says Educators Must See "
ing on Wall" and Join
Movement
"The demand on the part
ers for participation in a
tion has become, every year
sistent," said C. S.; Meek, su:
ent of Public schools of Tol
address yesterday afternoon
Teacher's Participation :in S
iies". "The tendency forI
quarter ofa century has ee
almost absolute control in
of the superintendent. It has
duty of the teacher to follo
tates, only the humble rig
tition is her's. But more,
we are coining to realize ti
ers must now be asked to
they qight to .do not orde
used to be."
Is Teacher's Right
The problem of the teac
tigipation has been the sub3
last few meetings of the
meetings of superintendents
fast becoming a necesswry
5shil administration, ac
Mr. Meek. The liv and p
teacher demands and has
to demand this privilege, he
duty of the administra'trs
education is to see "the' ha
on the wall" and td adju
selves to the democratic sw
movement, Mr Meek declare
The legend of the autocral
intendent and the prying an
tous supervisor is a fact anc
considered as a real grievan
part of the teacher, the $pel
tinued. The supervisor neil
in touch with everyday circ
and in many schools ' the
have scouts who watch for t
visor's coming and then the
is sent around the building,
is on the mat",
Would Exclude Objecl
Mr. Meek would be unwilli
certain classes of teachers
the wright to participate in'
tration. He referred to the
conscientious objectors wh
to everything proposed by t
intendent, and attempt to bl
all his plans. The object i
destructive purpose in v
should not have the right'
policies. He then descrbe
and and "even more f
group" ,of teachers who h
for many years and had g
a rut of regular classroom
from which no one could in
These kinds of teachers ar
ing somei/of the problems
front an administrator
school systems, the speake
"Then," he continued, "th
class that is dear to the he
ery superintendent, the you
ly who enter with zest into
it of his progressive plans,
i4 no rut from which they
dislodged, but who have the
give to the class something
thusiasm for work, the kno]
(Continued on Page F
STAFF NOTICE
jI There will be a meeting
women's staff of The A
3:30 o'clock this' afterno

id of a series of Women's
ies will be held at 4 o'-
y, July 13, on the terrace
Cook building, unless rain
which case it will be held
gypmnasium. /
ire of the afternoon will
nmance of several plays by
net's Marionettes. About
°s; of the faculty as well asl
nbers of the Shakespeare
ompany of New York, have
d. There will be music
the afternoon and punch
will be served. All women
ersity are invited.
teamer on Bermuda Rocks
, Bermuda, July 9.-(By A.
eamship Vauban from Bue-
une 21 for New York, went
s in Bermuda channel early
s not believed she is dam-
t is expected she will be
r with the after tide.

GROUP AT FRESH AIR CAMP
INDIAN CHIEF- AS
TEACHER

HAS

-

Chief Donatus and his wife, two'
Indians from the Ottawa tribe in
the northwestern part of Michigan,
have been obtained to teach basket
weaving at the University Fresh Air
camp, Lewis A. Reimann, director of
the camp, announced yesterday.
Some of the baskets and otherl
weaving work is now on exhibition at
Lane hall. All of their products are
for sale and the profit accruing will
go toward paying expenses for the
camp. The work done by the' boys
at the camp, who will be taught, by
the Indians, will be put on sale later
in the summer.
Another section of boys left for the
,camp last Saturday. They went to
the camp in automobiles furnished by
-the Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce.

'8A1K 1AT GREAT:FALLS
CLOSES FLO IGfIGHT
Great Falls, Montana, July 9-(By
A.P.)-The Stanton Bank and Trust
company of Great Falls closed its
doors today. George H. Stanton,
president, was prominent in the fin-
ancing of the Dempsey-Gibbons fight
at Shelby, Mont., on July 4.
The bank closed its doors in invol-
untary liquidiation. ,The failure to
meet the morning's clearings and rea-
lize upon its assets was given as the
reason. The institution had a capi-
tal of 250,000 and deposits of $600-
000. George H. Stanton announced the
bank was solvent and, every dollar
would be paid to depositors.
Burrows Sprains Ankle
. Edwin Burrows of the Journalism
department was 'unable to go on the
trip to the Detroit News plant with
his class last Thursday because of a
sprained ankle. The accident occur-
red while he was playing tennis on
the afternoon before the fourth of
July.,
The class continued its journey and
was conducted through the plant by
a guide furnished by the company.

AKESPEARE PLAYHOUSE presents in open air C imp s Theatre, at POPULAR PRIl

July 12th, 8:15 o'clock, Shakespeare's
nt of Venice."

Saturday Afternoon, July 14th, 3:30 o'clock, Shalk
peare's "As You Like It."
Saturday Night, at 8:15 o'clock, Shaw's "Candida."
Reserved seats, 75 cents; general admission,
cents. Reserved seats for four performances, $2.50.

kes-.

A
street.

dvance seat sale at Wahr's

Boolf Store,

5 o'clock,

"The

i

50

In case'of rain, performances will be gi
versity Hall.

......,'vwn.T y........v,.

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