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June 29, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-06-29

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ODAY

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DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1923

PRICE FIVE C

ON DA
SPROBLEM
I EDUCATION
4, PHYSICS, CHEMIS-
OLOGY ARE BASIC
TUDIES

.I 1 I .

FENDS1
LAST,

CLASSICS
EVENING

of Free . Election
is Fortnate Says
Educator

of

'he true theory of education is'
guiding of ignorance by intellig-
Sinto knowledge. Its true aim is
development of each individual to
be point of highest excellence."
can Andrew Fleming West of the
uate school of Princeton univer-
answered his own question, "Is
e a true story of education" in a
ire delivered last night in the Na-
1 Science'auditorium. Dean West
been dean of the graduate school
rinceton since 1901, and is con-
red one of the greatest authorities
he country on the subject of edu-
on.
iree theories of education are the
theories according to Dean West.
first is that education should be
erialistic. The making of a liv-
is certainly important. the materi-
idvantages of an education must
be overlooked. It is the cardinal
ciple of our civilization. And yet
making of a living is not half as
ortant as the making of life worth
e. -"Life will be worth while when
student understands the world in
ch he lives," he said. For'the pro-
understanding of thsi world and
great problems, the student en-
iters. three spheres of education.
he first is mathematics, physicsfi
nistry and biology. The student
ild know the basic principles back
le running of this earth, he should
erstand the elements that make
he universe, and he should under-
.d life and its beginnigs."
,CORD NUMBER INI
;O9cHIN6 SCHOOL'
'e T3an 130 Coarches From Every
Section of the Country Are
in Attendance
JRSES IN SIX BRANCHES
OF ATHLETICS BEING GIVEN
eginning the second year of its
itence, the Summer Coaching
ool has opened with an enroll-
it of more than 130 men, reprie-
ting over twenty states of the
on, from the Atlantic to the Pa-
. Among the states represented
Rhode Island, Colorado, New
npshire, Tennessee, Alabama,
sissippi, as well as Canada and
wai. Many Prep school, coaches
m the east and several prominent
state atiletes are among those
nding the session.
he Coaching School was first
ned during the summer session
.922 with an enrollment of 93 men.
curriculum includes courses In
ball, basketball, baseball,track,
anized play, and physical culture.
ual practice as well as theory is
of the chief features of the
rse, according to Coach George

EDITORIAL
THE SUMMER SESSION
During the summer months the Un-
iversity provides for the citizens of
the state a college session equal in
quality, if not in scope to the program
of the regular year. In addition spe-
cial features such as excursions are
added, which are not possible during
the regular term, due to inclement
weather.
The lecture program of the Summer
session is one bof its most noteworthy
features. Men of acknowledged
achievements in, science and letters,
authorities of the business and com-
mercial world, and leading lights in
the sphere of drama and music are
here to tell summer students the in-
teresting aspects of their respective
occupations. Their lectures are not
technical, they are the popular, com-
prehensive phases of earnest endeavor
in fields which are admittedly worthy.
Th summer lecturer does talk "above
the head" of his audience.
There isf 'an obsolete contention
which occasionally still prevails, that
the Simmer session is the paradise of
"flunks." Quite the reverseof this is
true. The Summer session is a time
of "doubling up" An work and double
speed is an uncomfortable pace for
the laggard. The University Sum-
mer program is two months of dilig-
ent work combined with additional
pleansant features that are made pos-
sible because of agreeable summer
weather adid a beautiful college town.
A. STEP TOO FAR

UNITED STATE'S'I
ACTION JUSTIFIED
INTERNATIONAL POLICY AND LAW
ARE INVOLVED IN a
ISSUE
ACTS ARE LAWFULL BUT
NOT COURTEOUS IS VIEW
Speech in Answer'to Lord Birkenhead'
in House of Lords
Debate
London, June 28-(By A.P.)-Mar-
quis Curzon, Secretary of Foreign Af-
fairs, made a long and important
statement in the House of Lords to-
day in reply to Iord Birkenhead who
called attention to the seizure by the
United States of liquor on British
vessels,
The Secretary declared that there
was no chance of Great, ,Britain agree-
ing to the proposal that United States
authoriies be given the right to search[
vessels for liquor within the 12-mile
limit. The government,. he added,
was fully alive to the importance of
the case, and all canoes of diplomacy
will be utilized to find an exit from
a situation which ought not to be al-
lowed to continue.
Lord Curzon explained: that it was
a very difficult and delicate matter
raising ta grave issue in both Inter-
national Law and policy.
Great Britain's legal position, ac-
cording to its legal authorities, Lord
Curzon said Is as follows:
"There are two recognized princi-.
ples of International Law which pre-
vent us from, contending tiat the
United States committed a violation
of international law in forbidding
foreign vessels to bring liquor with-
in its waters. The first is that for-
eigners trading with a country must
comply 'its laws. The second is that
every soverign independent state is
supreme over the persons and pro-
perty within its dominions including
ships in its territorial waters.
"However, On many matters th1e
practice has grown up that a state
should not exact compliance with its
own laws even though a ship is with-
in its waters, but leaves such qunes-
tions to be regulated by the law of
the flag state." This however, is in-
ternational practice, rather than in-
ternational law, and accordingly the
practice from it leads to a breach,

FOR RHODES
PRIZE

-

1
.

Century Old Dwelling Rebuilt
For Ypsilanti

m ;+e c Via. N.;K . -..
: ; . r
:

Centennial)

SCHOLARSHIPS
ARE~~ ANUC

I

I CO1EMITTEE NAMES MEN TO TR:

*""*. >".

Residents of Ypsilanti, celebrating
the one hundredth year of their city's
existence during the present week
tore down an ancient log cabin, a
landmark of the community for the
last century, moved it from its old lo-

cation, and rebuilt it in a centrally
located spot in order that it might
lend atmosphere to the occasion. The
upper picture shows members of the
Rotary club tearing down the old
structure, and the lower one shows
them in the act of reconstructing it.

Human Skin And Bones Found
By Workmen In Excavating

While liquor seizures are arousing
the, animosity of European nations,
a most unusual and extreme case of.
adherence to the Volstead three-mile
provision has occurred In the Hawai-
ian Islands. Stopping in Honolulu to
take 'on coal, the Japanese line, Korea
Maru, was releived of 267 quarts of
liquor which she was carrying sup-
posedly for medical purposes on her
journey to the United States, the of-
ficials leaving only twenty-five quarts
aboard the vessel.
Inasruch as the liner did not actu-
ally dock in the islands for any length
of time, the seizure of this cargo was
not only discourteous and intolerant
as ,ave been the seitures in .ether
ports, but more than that, an indis-
criminate imposition upon the rights
of a foreign vessel.
The Chicago Tribune in a recent ed-
itorial looks up the entire situation as
assuring the United States of a se-
cure place in any world conflict which
might ensue in the near future. Speak-
ing of the doubt which exists in some
people's minds regarding the possi-
bility of our gaining access to such a
war they say:
"We think that if the United States
keeps on sticking pins in other na-
tions we may view the future optim-
istically. It will be a world war and
prosperous, disliked Unle Sam, with
his pockets full of money, everybody's
creditor and chattel mortgage broker,
will be in it-aloe on his side, mak-
ing the world safe of Volstead."
Certainly the position of America in
international affairs will not be very
advantageous if the popular and con-
stitutional freedom of other nations is
not in some measure respected on the
high seass. This country has tackled
a tremendous problem In trying to
establish absolute prohibition, not
realizing that the first steps which
came with and immediately after the
passing of the eighteenth amendment
were but nibbles at the bait. We have
not struck the hook yet, but when we
do, it may drag us through a sea of
trouble that the instigators of the
first "dry" campaign up in Maine a
half century ago never dreamt of.
Mount Etna is spurting in an epi-
leptic fit. It would be a good thing
to get a few epileptics working
among the: earth's population if they
would spurt anything that could kill
the evils of the world as easily as the
lava stream demolishes everything it
comes in contact with.
If mosquitoes could be counted
among the population of the city of
Ann Arbor, it would rank as the larg-
est city of the world
A fellow has a fine time trying to
find a place to eat in A. A. with half
of the restaurants closed for the-

Workmen at the heating tunnel ex-
cavation just east of the Engineering
building, were startled by thre discov-
ery late Wednesday, of a quantity of
VISIT FORD PLANT
Will Also Go Through New Three
Million Dollar Public
Library
DETROIT TRIP WILL START AT
8 O'CLOCK TOMORROW MORNING

not of international law, but of
committee of nations that if one

the
na-

tion acts unreasonably toward the'
ship of another nation, the latter
must retaliate.
GROTTO CIRCUS COMES,
TO CLSETONIGHT
PRIZE BEAUTY TO BE PICKED AT 7
CLOSE OF FESTIVITIES;
FORDS RAFFLED
Tonight. will see the culmination of
the interests in the Zal-Gaz Grotto
circus when the most beautiful girl
in town is crowned queen She will
be selected tonight and will be award-
ed a trip to Atlantic City.
Beginning Tuesday night, the cir-
cus has been attended by hnge crowds.
The twenty acts by high class per-
formers have been the substaint.l
drawing card. Inside of the entrance
arch there are chance booths. Five
Fords will be given away, one for
each night. Wednesday night an add-
ed attraction was the public marriage
of an Ann Arbor couple.
I TRYOUTS WANTED FOR 1
I SUMMER DAILY STAFF I

The Ford Motor company, one of the
largest factories in the world, and
producing a daily output of more than
4,000 cars and employing 55,000 men,
will be visited by Summer session
students tomorrow morning, the par-
ty leaving tSate and Packard streets
at 8 a. m. on special D. U. R. cars.
* Special guides who will take charge
of the factory tour will meet the party
at the company's oflices. The various
departments in this vast "city of ma-
chinery" to be shown the visitors will
include: tool construction department,
the employment bureau, the Ford von-
veyor system for motor and final as-
seoinbly line where from the chassis
to the final delivery the "growing"
machine never leaves the traveling
belt, cutting and sewing rooms for
upholstery, and the great main crane-
way used for storage and having a
67,000 feet floor area.
From this point the group will pass
through the noisy, beehive crankcase
department to the power plant, the
last lap of the journey. These power
engines, nine in number, and housed
in a many-windowed, white-tiled
structure, are, capable of ,generating
sufficient energy to supply a "city of
500,000 inhabitants with water, gas,
electricity, and ice, and of producing
heat enough to supply the entire busi-
ness district and all the public build-
ings."
those of a human being, Russel C.
Hussey, instructor in geology, and
paleontology, stated last night that the
presence of hair and skin on the bones
indicated that they had been buried at
a comparatively recent date. One of
the theories that teh bones were those
of an Indian of the last century was
also sent glimmering by Mr. Hussey,
who said that the bones could not pos-
sibly belong to the Indian period if
skit was found attached to them. He
stated that he would examine them to-
day,

human bones, skin and hair, which
were unearthed by a atea mshovel.
Wild conjectures were indulged in, un-
til the arrival of Coroner Sam Burch-
field who dismissed the "murder" and
"mystery" theories with the opinion
that the bones were the remnants of
the work of students in the Medical'
school.
Although the bones have not been
positively identified by an authority as
After luncheon, arranged for by
the director of the trip, the students
who wish to see the ned Detroit pub-
lic library, occupying the spacious
block between Woodward and Case
avenues will be conducted through
reading rooms, departmental rooms,
through. the stacks, and have explain-
ed to them the artistic features of this
municipal center by one offthe Detroit
librarians. This white marble edifice,
finished but two years ago, cost
nearly $3,500,000 for site' and con-
struction. It has a capacity of 800,-
000 volumes and holds at the present
tipne close to 500,000. Its artistic
beauty places it in the front rank of
America's libraries: its classic design,
its mosaics and murals, and its stain-
ed glass windows, being objects of
universial praise.
For this trip, as with other excur-
sions of the summer, members plan-
ning to take it should leave their
names .in the Summer session box,
room 8, University hal, not later than
this morning. Adequate transporta-
tion annot be secured unless this is
done.
Riggs Will Deliver
Lecture Here Today

ONLY ONE PERSON TO BE
CHOSEN FROM MIHIGAN
Recipients of Other Fellowships For
Graduate Study Are
Named
Four students have been recom-
mended by the University committee
on fellowships, as candidates for the
Rhodes scholarship from Michigan,
and their names, in conjunction, with
the names from other institutions in
the state have been' sent to the state
committee in charge, for consideration
in the election to take place in De-
cember. . Most of the schools in the
state are privileged to recommend
men to the committee, lut only one
will be chosen this year. Two of the
students who have been chosen are
from the ,law school, one from the
literary school, and the other is a
student in the college of engineering
and architecture. They are: John P.
Dawson, Jr., '24L, Edward C. Mc-
Cobb, '23L, Edward T. Ramsdell, '23,
and John W. Ross, '23.
The Rhodes scholarship which is
from a fund left by the late Cecil
Rhode, famous English statesman, en-
titles the holder to study in Oxford
University in any field in'-which the
person desires. Only a limited num-
ber of such scholarships are available
in the United States, and it is one
of the highest honors that can be paid
a man to be elected as a Rhodes schol-
ar.
Other scholarships which were an-
nounced yesterday from the office of
the Dean of the Graduate school were
awarded to the following people. The>
fellowships will allow the holders ti
study in the University of Michigan
for the coming year, all being regu-
larly enrolled in the graduate school,
and doing graduate work. The list
of scholarships and those to whom
thej have been awarded follows.
The Carl Braun Felowship, award-
ed to Harris F. Fletcher, A.B., A. M.,
(June, 1923.)
BuhlClassical Fellowship, awarded
to Herbert M. Telford, Muskingum.
College A.B., Princeton University,
A.M.
The Cole fellowship in botany,
awarded to Louis E. Wehmeyer, BS.
The Hinsdale fellowships in Zool-
ogy, aw'arded to William J. Clench,
B.S., M. A. C
B.S., Michigan Agricultural College;
Harvard, M.S.; and to J. Paul Jones,
Morningside College, A.B.
The Lawton Fellowship in astron-
omy and .mathematics, awarded to
Hazel M. Losh,Ate, Ohio Wesleyan
University.
The Whittier Fellowship to Dow V.
Baxter, B.S.F., M.S.F.
University Scholarships, awarded to
the following; Wan L. Hsu, A.M., Pe-
king University; David W.. Lee, A.
B., Albion, A.M.;; and Kathleen M.
Lynch, A.B., Mount Holyoke, A.M.,
Columbia.
University Scholarships, awarded
to the following: Mildred F. Baxter,
A.B., Vassar, A. M.; Reid Bain, A. B.,
Willijamette University, A.M., Uni-
versity of Oregon; David M. Denni-
son, A.B., Swarthmore; Arthur S.
Haddaway, A. B., Knox College;
Enock E. Patterson, A.B., Luther
college, A.M.; Clarence H. Richard-
son, B.S., University of Kentucky,
A.M., University of Illinois; Kath-
reen V. Scudder, A.B., Stanford, A.
M., University of Chicago; Melvin
T. Solve, A.B., University of OVe-
gon; Gerritt T. VanderLugt, A.B.,
Malvin College, A. M.; and Edward.
R. Washburne, B.S., land M.S.
State College Fellowships, awarded
to the following: Peter H. Devries,
A.B., Hope colleke; Esther M. Fried-

reich, A+.B., Alma college; Cecil J.
McClean, B.S., Michigan Agrioultur-
al College; Minetta E. B. Nicholai,
A. B., Adrian; Marjorie Scaddin, A.
B., Albion; and Rufus F. Wylie, A.
B., Hillsdale.
The,,DuPont Fellowship in chemis-

ng the men who have come long
ces to attend the Coaching
1, R. 0. Humphrey of Puunene,
i ranks first. Mr. Humphrey is
ic Director in one of the larg-
gh schools in Hawaii, and has
recently colached his school's
ill team to a championship with-
eing scored on. He has traveled
miles to attend the courses in
cal training and athletic coach-
Charles Hoyt and Richard Bar-
,test additions to the University
ing staff, are also taking
es in the school.
faculty of the school Is cora-
of Fielding H. Yost, director of
Ics; George E. Little, Assistant
tor of Athletics; Coach Edward
ether, basketball; Ray Fisher,
all; Elmer D. Mitchell, Dr. G. A.
Archie Hahn, William Fallon,

Tryouts for the editorial. and
business staffs of the summer
Daily are wanted. Students de-
siring t9 do any work .of this
kind are requested to consult
with the managing "ditor be-
tween 7 and 8 o'clock any night
this week at the publication of-
fices in the Press Building.
The Daily affords practical
training in newspaper work both
in the editorial and business de-
partments.

I
I
|
i

Prof. Henry E. Riggs, of the civil
engineering department, who will de-

i

University authorities stated that
every body used in the Medical school
(Continued on Page Four)

liver a lecture on "Our Transportation
Problem from the Railway Viewpoint,"
in Natural Sieice auditorium at n
o'clock this afternoon.

t
x

try, awarded to John F. Ross, C
The National Andine and Chen
Company Fellowship, awarded
Leigh C. Anderson, Grad.

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