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June 27, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-06-27

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERTICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1923

PRICE FIVE

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FOR

RESEAR

T SURGEONS
CARE, CABOT
SIN' LECTURE

'S OF COMPETENT PHYSI-
TANS ARE AVAILABLE AND
ISHOULD BE CONSULTED
GES COMMON SENSE
IN HEALTH CRISIS
I Judgment Should be Used in
ISelection of Sur-
eons
here is no such thing as a sur-
1 operation free from danger,"
Dr. Hugh Cabot, of the Medical
od, last night in the Natural
ice auditorium, "however if pa-
s would use sound judgment in
choice of a surgeon, the risk
d be greatly .minimized." It is
often the case that we exercise
er judgment in the selection of
auffer while we choose at ran
the man in whose hands we will
our lives.
Should Retain "Sanity"
eople do no see operations in
same light in which they choose
ok upon other crises of life but
ider everything having to do with
medical profession as veiled in
ery, he continued. They aban-
sanity in the excitment of the
ent and cast aside that cool, pre-
'manner in which they deal with
commonplace problems.
Lis is partly the fault of the pro-
on itself for it bas been the cus-
to shroud in mystery all that
I not be explained by fact. Op-
ons which are performed easily
successfully today, 50 years ago
considered vital'
Select Surgeon Carefully
hen about to invest a thousand
rs in some business enterprise a
n will spend hours in delibera-
still when about to spend the
amount for an operation which
it mean life or deat hto him, he
s to shun the weight of so great
sponsibility and offers himself up
e first surgeon who is willing to
over the case," he said.
i any pharmacy in the western
sphere may be found a list of all
eons in a given vicinity along'
their ratings, still it is surpris-
vhat little attention is given these
.There is no excuse for any per-
not chosing a reliable surgeon.
in this sway assure a thorough
losis.
O.P. May Pick
owa Man To Run
Campaign Of '24

EDITORIAL
A DEFEATED PURPOSE
Following countless investigations
which attempted to unearth the source
of Russian radicalism and tried to
obliterate the destructive influences
that caused its sweeping rush upon
the minds of the entire nation, it is
now apparent that the germ of Russ-
ian unrest lies in the propaganda
forming the sole source of reading
material available on current affairs.
While freedom of the press is one
of the boasts of the Communistic re-
gime very few newspapers or period-
icals are issued without the approval
of the dictators who virtually con-
trol every publication in the broad ex-
panse of the country. The defeat of
the purpose of Commuism which
was originally formulated as the ideal
for society, becomes only too evident
when it is made known that nine dail-
ies are published in Moscow alone by
the - government's agents to mould
public opinion in favor of the veiled
autocracy of unscruplous dictators.
Little could be expected of the Ng-
norant populace of the great Russian
industrial centers other than a natur-
al acceptance of the propaganda which
is so carefully divested of sympathy
for all Bourgeois nations and customs,
and blindly ignores the evils of the
existing order within their own coun-
try.
Examples of this sort should be
enoukh to convince the Communists
in efficently organized communities
that total reorganization is invariably
useless. It is profitable and gratifying
to attempt to modify certain aspects
of any organization, thereby mould-
ing the whole nearer to perfection.
(Continued on Page Two)
'MICHIGAN IS BEST
-GRANTLNO ICE
Noted Athletic Critic Says Michigan
Leads Country in Sports for
Year 192-1923
MAIZE AND BLUE RECORD IS
ONE OF GREATEST EVER MADE
Grantland Rice, nationally famous
sports writer, is the latest authority
in the athletic world to concede that
Michigan took the honors above every
other college in the country during
the 1923 athletic season.
"In the East" he said "Princeton
led Yale at football, Yale had the
stronger crew, while on the other
hand, Princeton led Yale in the East-
ern Intercollegiates. Yale won the
dual meet between the two schools
with something to spare. The Prince-
ton ball team had the better record
of the two. "But," he continues, "We
should say that neither quite :had the
great al-around record of Michigan
at football, indoor 'track, cross-coun-
try, baseball, and tennis, not forget-
ting the out-door Western track
championship.
"on top of this Michigan won the
N. G. A. A. meet recently from a
strong field with the finest showing
that the, meet has ever known. So,
taking a slant at everything the Maize
and Blue rises slightly above every
other banner in the country. The av-
erage completed from October to June
has been (one of the greatest ever
made in the Western Conference,
where since able coaching finds able

material, it is always up to a high
standard. So Michigan seems to hold
the winning hand."
Baldwin Answers Liquor Quizz
London, June 26.-Stanley Baldwin
the prime minister, stated in the
House of Commons today hat there
was no ground for protest if British
customs seals were broken within
United States territorial waters by
officials of the United Staes customs
service.
His statement was in answer. to a
question whether Great Britain rec-
ognized America's right to break the
seals on liquor aboard ships.

CEURGES
WORLD MEET ON
NEW YORK SENATOR DEPLORES
STATE OF FARMERS OF
NATION
FORMER MAYOR SPEAKS
TO ANN ARBOR C. OF C.
Urges United States Interference in
European Affairs as Only
' Salvation
A plea for an economic conference
to be called by the president of the
United States to undertake the reha-
biliation of Europe, was the keynote
of the speech made by Senator Royal
S. Copeland of New York before
members of the Ann Arbor Chamber
of Commerce yesterday noon. Sena-
tor Copeland then disussed the ag-
ricultural situation in the country,
stating that the farmers of the na-
tion were in dire straits, and that the
future of the country was dark un-
less steps were taken to relieve their
condition.
Is Former Mayor
Senator Copeland, who is spending
his vacation at the home of his par-
ents in Dexter, was formerly mayor
of Ann Arbor and maintained that the
city's greatness and fame was nown.
throughout the country.
"When I was a child," declared Sen-
ator' Copeland, "I believed that Ann
Arbor was the greatest city in the
world. And to tell the truth my opin-
ion hasn't changed yet"
Ford's Election Improbable
The Senator has been delivering ad-
dresses in various states of the un-
ion and believes that he has had oc-
casion to feel the pulse of the people.
In spehking of the coming presiden-
tial campaign, he said,
"I find genuine sentiment and en-
thusiasm for Mr. Ford for president
and feel that were he nominated on
either party he would be elected. But
he will not be nominated because, in
my'judgment, he does not choose to
identify/ himself with either party."
Senator Copeland declared that he
was heart and soul in favor of Al
Smith, governor'of New York, for the
presidency.
FREH, AIRCAMP
First Section Includes 100 Detroit
Boys; Will be Held at Patterson
Lake, Near Pinckney
1923 OUTING IS FOURTH TO BE
SPONSORED BY UNIVERSITY
Michigan's Fresh Air Camp official-
ly opened yesterday noon when the
first section of 100 Detroit Jhoys left
Lane hall for the site of the camp
Patterson lake, near Pinckney. The
trip was made in a dozen motor cars
provided by citizens of Ann Arbor.
The first section of camp, under the
direction of Lewis Reimann, '15, will
last for two weeks when another de-
tachment of boys will be sent out,
after which two additional sections
will follow.
For the past three years the Fresh
Air Camp has been maintained for

the benefit of poor children of De-
troit under the supervision of the Stu-
dents Christian Association, the camp
being supported by money raised
among tl e students of the Univer-
sity. Patterson lake has been the
location for the past two years, the
former site being near Port Huron.
Children for the camp are selected by
the. Juvenile Court of Detroit.
Forest Fire Terrorizes Jersey Town
Trenton, June 26.- (By A.P.) -
Franklin Park, a village near here,
was imperiled by a forest fire today.
Several farms have been wiped our:
and authorities say it is impossible
to save the village.

Excursion On Boulevards Is
- Students Program Tomorrow

Ann Arbor's parks and boulevard
drives around the hills and along the
river will be advantageously visited
by summer session students tomor-
row afternoon when automobiles, fur-
nished for the occasion, will tour the
city's attractive suburbs. Following
a ride through the south east section
of ,the city, noted for its homes, the
party will proceed down the Geddes
Avenue boulevard to the river, wind
,PAN FOR SESSION

Trips, Lectures, Demonstrations,
Entertainment Program of
Summer Session

WILL FINAl

on

FIRST EXCURSION TO BE MADEI
THURSDAY AROUND ANN ARBOR
By Robert Ramsay
The University offers this year an
unusual series of lectures, illustrated'
demonstrations, excursions, and in-
formal talks, to students of the Sum-
mer Session. The series of special
events as announced by Dean Edward
H. Kraus indicates an incomparable
program which is to extend through-
out the entire session.
One of the features of the Summer1
session, is the series of excursions
which will be conducted under Mr.
Carlton, F. Wells of the rhetoric de-
partment. The first of these excur-
sions will be taken tomorrow . Two
major excursions, one to Niagara
Falls and the other to Pt-in-Bay in
Lake Erie wi be conducted by Pro-
fessor J. P. Rowe of the University
of Montana who will teach in the geol-
ogy department this summer . He has
been, since 1902, Director of the Mon-
tana geological survey and is a mem-
ber of many national societies of
science. Professor Rowe has writ-'
ten several books on geology and
kindred subjects.
Among the leading men in their
lines of endeavor who will teach here
this summer session are Professor
Rowe in the geology department, and
such men as Charles Darwin Kings-1
ley, state supervisor of High schools'
in the department of education in
Massachusetts who will give several
lectures on the administration of
high schools. Mr. Arthur B. Moehl-
man director of statistics and refer-
ence for the Board of Education in
Detroit who will give an exhibition of'
model schools in the West gallery of
Memorial hall. A series of lectures
has been planned on thesubject of
school administration to be given by
men well known in fields of secondary
and higher schools, and in vocation-
al training. '
Among the non-resident teachers
are Oscar D. Skelton, Sir John H.
Macdonald, professor of political and
economic sciences and dean of the
faculty of arts in Queen's university,
Karl Taylor Kompton, professor of
Physics at Princeton university, and
Joseph Walter Bingham, Professor
of law in Stanford university.
Union Building
Now Open To All
Summer Studeutrs
All departments of the Union ex-
cept the bowling alleys and the bil-
liards room will be for the use of the
summer session students according to
an announcement made by the man-
agem'ent# yesterday afternoon. The
taproom, reading rooms, and the din-
ing room will be open to the mem--
bers as during the regular sessions.
A membership fee of two dollars is
being paid in connection with the reg-
ular entrance fees of the University.'
All full-paid life members will have
the two dollars refunded to them
while al participating life members
wiil have it applied upon their pay-
ments for membership.

west along the river past the new hos-
pital, and north across the river.
Barton Hills Country Club will be
the next objective; and from there
the motorists will trail back along
Barton Lake and the Huron river.
At the Main stre-et bridge, the route
will lead to the north boulevard,
which passes the municipal island
park. The auto trip will require an
hour, finishing at the campus starting
point at 3:30.
From there the students will visit
the University library, having its
methods, its equipment, and its archi-
tectural features explained by the
University librarians. Inspection of
Alumni Memorial hall and the Michi-
gan Union will tomplete the after-
noon's tour. It will conclude short-
ly before 5 p. m.
GENEVA STUDENT
CONFERENCE ENDS
University of Michigan Representa.
tives in Attendance at
Meeting
LOCAL DELEGATION WINS
SEVERAL ATHLETIC CONTESTS
Special to The Daily
Lake Geneva, June 26.-Eighteen
University of Michigan students spent
the closing hours this morning of a.
ten-day Conference on the banks of
Lake Geneva as the annual Y. M. C.
A. Lake Geneva Student Conference
broke camp. More than 800 delegates
of whom 700 were student representa-
tives from the various colleges of the
nine Central states represented, were
present at the conference.
Discuss Campus Life
The program of the conference con-
sisted of a series of morning speeches,
some of which were given by Stitt
Wilson, Raymond Robins, Robert
Spear, Bishop MacDowell, and other
men of national repute. - At the, con-
clusion of the talks the 800 men di-
vided themselves into five groups for
the discussion of problems on campus
life.
Michigan was well represented, and
took her share of the honors of the
conference. She won the song con-
race, won a number of athletic con-
test, took second place in the row boat
tests, and ranked well in nearly all
of the other contests.
18 Michigan Delegates Attend
The men who attended the confer-
ence were: J. Howard Anderson, '24
E, Harry C. Clark, '26L, Gerrit E. Fiel-
stra, '25E, Perry M. Hayden, '25, Eg-
bert R. Isbell, '23, Norman B. John-
son, '25, Harold K. Latta, '24, Ren-
sis Likert, '26E, Thomas H. McEach-
esn, '25, Herbert Steger, '25, Robert
Straub, '25, George D. Thompson, '26.
The foreign students were as fol-
lows: Paul Young, '23, S. T. Yang, '23,
R. Y. Chew, '23, N. M. Malik, '25, A.
N. Ryar, '25, and J. M. Yang, '26.
Ann Arbor citizens in attendance
included Rev. Lloyd Wallick, Rev.
E. Knox Mitchell, Jr., and H. C Coff-
man. -
On Again, Off Again
Shelby, Montant, June 26.-(By A.
'P.)-Further obligations loomed today
in the management of the Dempsey-
Gibbons bout, when lumber contract-
ors threatened to foreclose a lien on
1l, to habh d nk ,i t un tion

AL
ON

WORK BEGUN BY KELSEY IN
NEAR EAST WILL BE
CONTINUED
DONOR ASKS THAT
NAME BE WITHHELD
University Will Join Other Institu-
tions in Old World Investiga-
tions
A $100,000 gift to the University for
the purpose of furthering archeolog-
ical research in the near-East given
by a benefactor whose name is with-
held at his own request, was an-
nounced through the office of .the
President yesterday morning. The
gift is to be payable in two equal in-
stalments over a period of two years.
Will Continue Kelsey's Work
Although it has not been made pub-
lie in exactly what direction the re-
searches made possible by this gift
will be conducted, the continuation
of work begun by Prof. Francis Kel-
sey, head of the Latin -departmeint in
1919 is now made-possible, and the
money was presented to the Univer-,
sity with that purpose specifically
stated.
During previous expeditions to the
near-East Professor' Kelsey succeed-
ed in acquiring for the University a
collection of Greek and Copric papy-
rus documents such as no other uni-
versity in America possesses. In ad-
dition a large collection of other man-
uscripts and archaeological material
was made, furtfmer wdrk being hinder-
ed only by a lack of the necessary
funds. It is understod that with the
funds which will now be available
continuation of the work will be un-
dertaken where it was left off after
the former expeditions.
Guthe Now in Philippines
At the present time five American
universities have archeological ex-
peditions in foreign fields. Michigan
has had an expedieion
has had an expedition in the Philip-
pinesfor the past year under the di-
rection of Dr. Earl Guthe several
shipments of irreplaceable relics hav-
ing already been received by the Uni-
versity Museum. Yale university has
a party of men at work excavating in
Mesopotamia while Harvard has sent
three men to three, different locations
in the near and far East. Princeton
and Chicago also are represented by
groups of archeologists in the near
East, the Chicago group being at
present working in Palestine.
INFORMAL TEAS FEATURE
;WOMEN'S LEAGUE PROGRAM
Ida V. Jenks, '24, acting presidentr
of the Women's League for the sum-
mer session, has announced that the
League activities for this summer
will include a number of informal
teas which will be held at the dormi-
tories during the term.
The object of the I4eague parties
is not to raise money but to afford
the women of University the oppor-
tunity to become acquainted with one
another. All women enrolled in the
University will be welcome.

I

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s

ner Senator Rawson

0

JumperLo De usea n Consurucl
work.
Actors Are Killed By Lightning
New York, June 26.-(By A.P.)-
George Savoy and Percival Brachman
were killed by a bolt of lightning,
while they were walking on a beach
this afternoon. Savoy was well known
in the theatrical world as a female
impersonator.
Yale Wins Big Three Championship I
New York, June 26.-(By A. P.)-
Yale defeated Princeton today for the
baseball championship of the Big I
Three. Both teams had defeated Har- I
vard.. i

TRYOUTS WANTED FOR I
SUMWTER DAILY STAFF
Tryouts for the .editorial -and |
business staffs of the summer I
Daily are wanted. Students de- |
siring to do any work of this |
kind are requested to consult
with the managing editor be- I
tween 7 and 8 o'clock any night I
this week at the publication of- I
fices in the Press Building.
The Daily affords practical I
training in newspaper work both |
in the editorial and business de- |
partm'ents.

are current that former
awson of Iowa, may be the
e choice of rival Repub-
ons to manage the 1924
It is believed that Raw-

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