100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Attu LUUItIULAU
PRESIDENT IN, SpunC

ous with striking an attitude but it is
shrewdly to be suspected that the Am-
erican people do not know the differ-
once. When Harding vetoed the bon-
us bill he showed. himself as care-
full of consequences as ever did
Cleveland. A man does not have to.

cents per word
in advance; f if-
r reading line per

F
t
i7
ti
n
a
rE
b
e0
w
01

(Continued from Page One)

.

set of high class col-
The Meet in Bach-
uitable for fraternity
tinting, three French
pictures and frames.
,ble for quick sale.
43-c
rsian kittens, take a
11 any day except Sun-
inley. 43-p-2
y .1921 Maxwell tour-
hiauled, cord tires. A
home. See Small'at
te, Phone 1363-J. 43-p

McK

LAE--Pedigreed colile pups,
hone 745-W. 43-p-2
ALE-Bicycle in good condition.
733 Fast University. 43-c-2l
ALE-Ford Speester, good con-
, cheap. Call 374 after 6:30 p.}
41-c-3
WANTED
CD- A single room with twof

they 'were these two simple ones- wear his skeleton on the outside like
goodwill and service. Perhaps we are a tortoise to prove his possession of
too prone to forget in the complexities backbone.
of modern life how profoundly true President Harding was not a pro-
they are. Simplicity. is another at- phet or what often passes for 6ne, a
tribute of the greatness of our de- maker of phrases. He had not the
parted President. . knack of defining issues or of dramat-
If there sometimes seemed to be in izing situations, with himself in the
him an absence of that inflexible will leading role. Though a fluent and
which we natuarally associate with pleasing speaker, he'was by nomeans
the successfu I weilder of executive a great orator. The American public
power, it was simply that the exprescraves its daily thrill as a drunkard !.
sion of his will was modified by'hum- his dram. By the same token it puts
ility and amiability. Ile was too kind- too high a value on the superficial tal-
ly to sptak with a decisiveness which ents of tongue and pen. It, hungers.
might be harsh. He was too humble for drama in politics and it under-
to brandish the capital "I" over the estimates the worth of a calm mild
backs of cringing followers. But he manner pentleman who speaks to it
could stick to his course. The rec- copiously but without great climaxes.
ords of his administration show the Roosevelt acquired a great reputa-
results of his steady unostentatious tion for firmness and undaunted coar-1
pressure tovrfard definite ends. age by closing the saloons of New4
That a man of President Harding's York, on one Sunday. Harding's de-'
qualities should be loyal to his party termination to enforce the A8tn amend..
was inevitable. Sudh loyality does ment-one o the most courageous
not argue a base surrender of person- Political acts of our time-raised
al convictions, a bartering of honor scarcely the merest shiver of admir-.
for place and power, but rather the ation; taking a stand is not synonym-
disposition which refuses to go back Great and significant things were
on a friend. To some of us, especially accomplished by the Harding admin-
those of the academic circles, issues istration. The Washington Arms
mean much and men mean little. Not Conference with its limitation of nav-s
so to Ilarding. As a humble man he 'al armaments and its four power trea-x
sought the support of a party. As a ty for the security of the Pacific-do
practical man he realized the impos- you think the less of it because the
sibility of political success without President's part was modestly played.i
one. Having once engaged himself What a stage for an orator was set.
in a party he was engaged for good. at its opening session. It would havef
added to the interest of life and tor
LOSTAND FOUND ' the President's reputation if Harding1
LOST-Rider fountain pen,Th ayhad been a Demosthenes, but not a

c

whit to the results of the Conference.f wis
Harding became President at a time con
when the country was suffering /in- goo
ensely from the economic displace- of
Ments of the war. His administra- Of
ion has restored confidence to busi- a su
ness, enforced economy, reduced tax- his
tion, earned the respect of labor. Our in a,
elations with Spanish America have self
een put on a satisfactory footing- No 1
ven the Mexican situation is in a fair foun
'ay to settlement. At the same time al h
uarEuropean relations have been sus- coup
maned in no narrow or unhelpful
pirit. President Harding never be-
onged to that short sighted band who
ainly seek to isolate the United
tates. Neither his common sense
or his spirit of service could be
econciled with such an attitude. Con-
inced that American sentiment was
Terwhelmingly opposed to participa-
.on in the League of Nations, he
ought other means of associating the
Tnited States with Europe in the
ovement for peace. His advocacy of
he World Cour-t led him for the firt l
me to appeal directly to the people
ver the heads of the opposing poli-
cians . It cost him .his life.
in his two years and a half as
resident he was never once guilty of
3vity, cynicism, petulance or egotism.
ne who cani take up the burden of
.e presidency in troubed times, en-
ure the lgibes of his enemies, the
saffection of 'his own partisans and
he misunderstanding of the people
nd avoid these daily habits of lesser
inds and small occasions is indeeds
man,
President' Harding was a fine ex-
mple of that most typical of our
roducts the middlewestern Ame'rican.
ou may sneer with Sinclair Lewis
t a Babbit's absence of broad culture,
s self-complacency and the' trivial
und of his activities, but if you are

4 'LAST ITIMES TODAY'Sz
fe Wel Entertained.
While amusement shopping make sure that the
theatre you attend is- presenting a play that has
in it that which you like to see-
HUMOR, SUSPENSE, TIMELINESS, ,ACTION, ROMANCE

e you will pause to admire his
rage, resourcefulness, energy, and
d will. He has learned the art
working with and through men.
ths type President Harding was
upreme example, not differing from
fellows in kind but simply cast
1larger mould,-clean, upright, un-
sh, fond 'of men, eager to serve.
president ever evinced a more pro-
nd sense of responsibility. He gavel
he had ,even to life itself to his
ntry.

Mr. Hoover tells us that when,
came back to America at our ent
into the war to take up the worl
the food administration, he met Ha
ding. His greeting was, "Neighbc
I want'to be.helpful." There you ha
the full measurae of the man. He ca
ried it into every day's most siml
need . He expanded it to meet t
exigencies of cashing nations. At t
very end he stretched out his wea
hands to the nations calling, "Neig
bors, I want to be helpful."

See THOS. H. INCE'S story, of circus
life that's a circus to see
"TH E SOUL OF

SUNDAY
"THE LAW OF
THE LAWLESS')
with
Dorothy Dalton
Theodore Kosloff
Tully Marshall

well heated in cold
near the campus.
.A., Daily.

weath-
Senior.'
41-p-3

THE BEAST"

TYPEWRITERS

,ra-

of standard makes

Also BULL MONTANA
In a Great Comedy
"SNOWED UNDER"

sold, rented, exchanged,
nd repaired.
O. D. MORRILL
Arcade Phone 1718
1-tfr

afternoon. Name oi barre'll. Call

__ _

Parks, 960 or 558.

31-p-16

ATI0NERY

E SALE-Correspondence
r. All clean stock at less
0. D. Morrill, .17 Nickels'
Open evenings. tfr

TYPEWRITING
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEOGRAPII-
ING promptly -and neatly done.
Typewriters cleaned and repaired.
0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels Arcade. tfr

Cburcb ervcces

end Ckurc 5ervices Sunday.
FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH

SAYLES, Minister
R. CHAPMAN,
for Students

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Rev. A. 11. Stalker D. D., Pastor
10:30 A. M. 'Ideals and Idols" by
Dr. P. V. Roberts of Evanston,
Illinois.
11:45 A. M. StudentI Discussion
Group at Wesley Hall.
6:30 P. M. Miss Genevieve Koehn,.
Leader of Wesleyan Guild De-
votional Meeting.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
(DISCIPLES)
* LANE HALL
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor

:1

12

10:30. Dr.
will be the

The Engineering in a Curling Iron

1 will meet at 11:45.

ent Guild Class will meet
11:45, and Mr. George
ge will be the, leader.

9:30
10:30
12:00

A.,
A.
A.

M.
M.-

Bible School.
Sermon.
Men's Service Club.
Students' Class.
Christian EIndeavor.

6:30 P. M.

Corner Catherine and Division Street-
Henry Lewis, Rector
y, August 12
A. M. Holy Communion,
A. M. Morning Prayer and Sermon by the Rev. George Back
turst of St. Mark's Church, Marine City.r

What sort of engineering is it that.
makes a study of the needs and the
interests of women and creates prod-
ucts to satisfy them? Does it seem
that, in practice at least,' this sort of
thing is a little different from your
understanding of what an engineer
really is and does '
After all, when you come to think of"
it, engineering is concerned with all
the facts of life. It takes the old facts
and' interprets them in new and
broader ways; but its big job is the
very big job of making more living,
-fuller living,-readily available. It
is, in every aspect, a thing worth do-
ing , whether it concerns itself with,
curling, irons or converters, or any of"
the thousands of products in between.
This is truly the day of the engi-
neer. His judgments and his equip-

ment are sought in almost every phase
of living. Engineering is remaking the
business of housekeeping. Its methods
are being applied to merchandis-
ing, to distribution, to the wrapping of
bundles and the packing of boxes, to
the lighting of streets and the hun-
dreds of things that, a few years
back, were strictly "rule-of-thumb".
By the time you are atwork 'out in
the world, there will be more-though
there are only a few of them left.
Whatever is worth doing is worth
engineering; engineering effort digni-
fies itself. ,Whether it puts more use-
fulness into transformers or, curling
irons or turbines does not matter.
The thing that counts is the work, the
creative, constructive service that is
going on for the lasting benefit of
mankind.

5f

rv''

Holy Communion in Williams' Memorial Chapel. Harris
'T PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,

DIVISION AND HURON

Lewis C. Reilnann, Secretary Men Students

M. Morning Service. F. J. Youngson,
11 preach.

of Aberdeen, Scotland,

-1

e and Primary Sunday Schools meet at 10:30.
for Young People at noon.

ACHIEVEMENT &OPPORTUNITY

at 6:00 for Social Half Hour.

Regular

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan