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August 10, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,.
,.

ool teeing Repaired;
l- House Engineering .Overflow

'With the demolishing of West hall
which has served for more than a
quarter of a century as the headquar-
ters for the Rhetoric department, af-
ter being condemned by the Ann Ar-
bor Board of Education for further
use as a' ward school, the campus,
loses one of its oldest land-niarks.
But Michigan is not going to be with-
out old relics of buildngs for some-
time yet to come, for 'another old ward
school building which passed into the
hands of the University last year is
destined to remain and furnish class
rooms for engineers. This is the old
Tappan school on Eist University ave-
nue, across from the medical school.
Tappan ward school has served the
grade school children of the sixth
ward for many years, and just re-
cently ,upon the completion of a new
Tappan school on South University,
avenue, it was abandoned. Being lo-
cated on what will soon be a por-
tion of the new campus, just across
from the Engineering building, it
was taken over by the University
for further use as class-room space
for the Engineering school, and in
this capacity has served Michigan
well for the past year. Now that the
completion of the new engineering
shops is assured for the opening of
the fall term, it has been expected
that this old land mark will be torn
down, but to the contrary, the possi-
bility of its serving Michigan engin-
eers as class room space for some
time to come is assured by the entire
,remodeling of its interior and the'
Mobilize to Seize Mexican Bandit
Mexico City, Aug. 9.- (By A.P.) -
Mobilization of the federal forces in
the state of Durango and their co-op-
eration with the military forces in
adjoining states in an. effort to cap-
ture the bandit leader, Juan Galindo.
and force the release of Robert A.
Newman, who was kidnapped by the
bandit last April, has been ordered.
GAR RICK h^TS.& s.at 25-50c'
14th Annual Season Nights 25-50-75c-$1
THE BONSTELLE CO.
in the "High Power Hit" _
"SIX-CYLiNDER LOVE"
Next Week-"The Fox and the Gander"

jinstallation of a modern heating ap-
paratus, which is now taking place
The question remains, "Will the old
Tappan Sixth ward school remain
with us as a campus landmark as long
as did West hall?"
Arranges Details
Of Chief's Burial

PROFESSOR HOBBS, ON
WAY TO AUSTRAllA
Word has been received from Prof.
William H. Hobbs, of the geology de-
partment, from Auckland and Well-
ington, New Zealand. Professor Hobbs
reports having observed many inter-

esting geological phenomena on his Istralia before returning to the tin-
trip. ited States in the fall.
It has been fairly cold in New Zea-
land in marked contrast to the trop- Exchange Clubs Hold Picnic
ics, according to Hobbs. New Zea-
landers have experienced the coldest
winter in 30 years.IL
Mr. Hobbs is now on his way to
Sydney, Australia, where ho is 'attend
the Geological Association conference
to which he is a delegate. He will
continue to the porthern part of Au-

Monroe, Jackson and Adrian he
picnic yesterday afternoon at
Lake. Ball games and quoits wer
joyed by the members during the
ernoon.

I II1!I

I

.

-r -.- -

---.....

111

~1

Today-
Jane Novak in
"THELMA"
By Marie corelli
Monty Banks in "A QUIET VACATION."
Sun.-Wed.-
Double feature program.
Gladys Walton in "SAWDUST,"
and an All-Star Cast in
"COUNTERFEIT LOVE"
Coing-Corinne Griffith in
'THE SINGLE TRACK"

Today-
Roy Stewart and Kathleen
Kirkham in
"BACK TO YELLOW-JACKET"
By Peter B. yne
Buddy Messinger in "BOYHOOD DAYS
Sun. -Tues.--
Jane Novak in "COLLEEN OF THE PINES
Stan Laurel in "MUD AND SAND"
Wed. -Iirrs.-
Florence Reed in
"THE BLACK PANTHER'S CUB"
Walter Forde in "GOOD DEEDS"

"Z'"7STARTING TODAY"'?

Ii

e BeWell Entertained !

im

While amusement shopping make sure that the
theatre you attend is presenting a play that has
in it that which you like to see-

I

HUMOR, SUSPENSE, TIMELINESS, ACTION, ROMANCE

I

See THOS. H. INCE'S story of circus
life that's a circus to see

SUNDAY

I,"THE SOUL ',OF-

fTHE LAW Of
THE LAWLESS"
with
Dorothy Dalton
Theodore Kosloff
Tully Marshall

11

xieut. Col. Clarence 0. Sherrill
Lieut. Col. Clarence 0. Sherrill, mil-
itary aide to the late President War-
ren G. IHlarding, was in charge of the
.'Washington, D. C., end of the funeral
arrangements for his late "chief."
(Continued from Page One)
out that "the most vital instrument"
with which Germany might pay had
been taken ;away when the Ruhr was
seized. Herr Cuno asserted that if
Germany's collapse was to be accom-
plished "in the name of justice" she
must be under no illusion..
"Submission to the merciless obstin-
acy of the French government," he
said, "would have to be sealed with a
document which would be worse than
the treaty of Versailles which weighs
like a curse upon the people of Eu-
rope-"
Disorder Out of Place
"If there is no light on the ,horizon
whichpromises us speedy help,". he
declared, "then it is for us to keep
alive, by ieans of our own, our iron
determination."
Civil war or disorder could have no
place in Germany at the present time,
the chancellor said, adding that such
outbreaks would be suppressed by the
gdlernment.
Exchange Notes

m flu

I1

THE' 8EAST"

II

= iilitilll~ttl ' 11 11111111111111111111111 11 111111111111111111111 1111111 11111 i11 11111111111
I WI TE S WAN LANRYC
Launderers, Cleaners
Dyers, Pressers :: ::
Cents' Suits.... .$1.25
Ladies' Suits... .$1.50 up
ONE DAY SERVICE ON, REQUEST
PHONE 1 6 5

IL

e

Also BULL MONTANA
In a Great Comedy
H SNOWED UNDER"

j

f

Classified Ad
Rates: Two cen
per day, paid in,
teen cents per re:
day, charged.

dvertising
nts per word
advance ; fif-
ading line per

, iTEI
ANTED-Ford Roadster, model 1921
or 1922, with starter. Call R. Rice,
371. 41-p
ANTED- A single room with two
wndows, well, heated in cold weath-
er, and near the campus. Senior.
Box C.B.A., Daily. 41-p-3
FOR RENT
OR R~i NT-Single room, near cam-
pus, for fall. No other roomers 'in-
house. 518 Cheever Court, 2889-M.
41-c

I

R RENT- Front suite and large
'oom. Both have good closets and
ight. 427 S. Fifth Ave. 41-p-2

FOR SALE
FOR SAL-Ford Speester, good con-
dition, cheap. Call 374 after 6:30 p.
m 41-c-3
TYPEWRITERS
['ypewriters of standard makes
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned and- repaired.
0. D. MORRILL
.7 Nickels Arcade Phone 1718
1-tr
TYPEWRITING
L'YPEWRITING AND MIMEOGRAPH-
ING promptly and neatly done.
Typewriters cleaned and repaired.
0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels Arcade. tfr
STATIONERY
%LEARANCE SALE--Correspondence
stationery. All clean stock at less.
than cost. 0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels'
Arcade. Open evenings. tfr
LOST AM) FOUND
3EWARD-$25 for return of suit and
white knickers taken from Sigma Nu
Ho'use; Friday, August 3. No ques-
tions asked. T. N. Goddgrd. 41-c
OST-Copy of H-amsun's "Growth of
the Soil" on campus last night.
Please call W. K. Greiner, 1003 E.
Huron. JPhone 909. 41-p
,OST-Rider fountain pen, Thursday
afternoon. Name on barrell. Call

Amherst.-Theaddition'ofrten pro-
Sfessors and special lecturers to the
Faculty of Amherst college has been
announced by President George D.
Olds. The appoihtees will take .the
places of professors and instructors:
who left thi college a the result of
the resignation of President Alexan-
der Meiklejohn in June.
Among those appointed are Ernest
Barker, Principal of Kin'g's College.
London, who will be Professor ad in-
terim of History and Political Econo-
my; Percy Holmes, Boynton, Dean of
the Colleges of Arts, Literature and
Science of Chicago University, who
will be special lecturer in English;
Robert Frost, poet and Professor of
English at Amherst from 1916 to 1920,
who will return to his chair in the
English department, and Lindsay Rog-
ers, Associate Professor of Govern-
ment at Columbia University and au-
thoir of several books, who will be
a special lecturer in history and po-
ltical science.
LATE PRESIDENT TO BF
BURIED iN MARION TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
eral'procession will form for the jour-
ney to the cemetery and at 3 o'clock
the body of Warren G. Harding will
be laid at rest. It will be placed in a
receiving vault until a suitable maus-
oleum can be erected.
Funeral to be Private
Only members of the intimate par-
ty which made the trip to Alaska
with President Hardng were on the
funeral train. Cabinet members Hoov-
er, Work, and Daugherty are includ-
ed in the party.
President CoolidIge, and other high
government officials, who, as private
citizens, will attend the funeral serv-
ices here, will arrive tomorrow at 11'
a. m. on another special train. It was
Mrs. Harding's wish, and her wish is

I

What sort of engineering is it that
makes a study of the needs and the
interests of women and creates prod-
ucts to satisfy them? Does it seem
that, 'in practice at least, this sort of
thing is a little different from your
understanding of what an engineer,
really is and does?
After all, when you come to think of
it, engineering is concerned with all,
the facts of life. It takes the old facts
and interprets them in new and
broader ways; but its big job is the
very big job of making more living,
-fuller living,-readily available. It
is, in every aspect, a thing worth do-
ing, whether it concerns itself with
curling irons or converters, or any of
the thousands of products in between.
This is truly the day of the engi-
neer. His judgments and his equip-,

The Engmeering in a Curling Iron,

I

ment are sought in almost every phase
of living. Engineering is remaking the
business of housekeeping. Its methods
are being applied to merchandis-
ing, to distribution, to the wrapping of
bundles and the packing of boxes, to
the lighting of streets and the hun-
dreds of things that, a few years,
back, were strictly "rule-of-thumb".
By the time you are at work out in
the world, there will be more--though
there are only a few of them left.
Whatever is worth doing is worth
engineering; engineering effort digni-
fies itself. Whether it puts more use-
fulness into- transformers or curling
irons or turbines does not matter.
The thing that counts is the work, the
creative, constructive service that is
going on for the lasting benefit of
mankinid.

/

ACHIEVEMENT 8 OPPORTUNITY

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