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August 10, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-10

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TOD)AY

(i e Lttm r,
it

)A

I

:Iaitlj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND~ NIGHT VII
SERVICE

42,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1923

PRICE FIVE

19L TRIBUTE TO
HARDINS TODAY
CES TO IE HELD IN HILl.
UDITORIUN AT FOUR
O'CLOCK
ICE TO REIGN FOR
IVE MINUTE PERIOD

WHERE HARDING FUNERAL CORTEGE WILL PASS

t

AS MARION, OHIO, PAYS TRIBUTE TO ITS OWN

+4l
p

lling of' Church Bells to Mark
Coinuiencement of Memorial
Meeting
Jniversity and city will pay final
>ute to the memory of Warren G.
rding at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
I auditorium.
Lt the stroke of the hour every per-
i in the city whether he is attend-
the services or not at the auditor-
a will stand for five minutes in sil-
tribute to the departed President.
eryone who contemplates attending
serices will be expected to be in
,auditorium and be seated before 4
lock in order that no disorder may
i' the solemnity of the short per-
of silence and prayer.
tanks throughout the city will be
sed all day in compliance with the'
ernor's proclamation but hotels
I restaruants because of their ob-
ations in service .to the public will
closed only during the period from
intl 5 o'clock.
ections will be reserved in Hill au-
rium for all fraternal organiza-
s who contemplate attending as
ups.
'he tolling of church bells through-
the city and the sounding of "as-
ibly" in Hill auditorium will mark
opening of the period of silence
I the memorial services and will
se with the sound of "taps" and the
sing of flags which, have remained
hialf staff since last Friday, to full
ESH MAN ENROLLMENT
TOTAL NEAR THOUSAND
APPLICATIONS FOR ENTRANCE
ALREADY ACCEPTED BY
REGISTRAR
rp to the present time, 956 student
Mications for entrance in the Uni-
sity in the fall have been accepted,
ording to the statistics from the
ce of the registrar. The number of
lications that had been accepted' by
y 31 was 817, an increase of 87
r the 730 application received by
same time last year.
eventy applicants out of this num-
' ~~e graduates from the.Ann Ar-
r hig chool.dThese figures do not
lude students who enter with ad-
iced credit.
OST WILL REURN
TO A HER IN FALL
obert Frost, for the past two years
ident poet of the University by vir-
of hdlding the Chase S. Osborn
owship in creative arts, will return
his former position as teacher of
glish in Amherst college at the
sing of the, fall semester, accord-
to word reaching here yesterday.
fr. Frost became resident poet of
University in 1921 through the
erosity of former Governor Chase
Osborn. The following year the
owship was renewed anonymously.
Looking for Rooms?
Have you rented your room for
next fall yet? Do it before you
go home-il will be a lot easier
-and you will find a better
rom. ILet Jimmy help you--
he will find a good room for you,
aid af almost no trouble to you.'

Looking north on South Main street, Marion, showing the courthouse at Center and Main streets where the body will lie in state. Arrows Indicate
route of funeral procession

Citizens of Marion. will get their last views of the body of the late President Harding while it lies in the Marion county courthouse for
eral hours Friday hefore being taken to the residence of his father, Dr. George T. Harding, Sr., whence the funeral will be held. The funeral
cessiontwill move west on East Center street from the Harding home, turning on South Main street to Marion cemetery. Harding will rest in lot
his mother and sister. ?

sev"
pro-
with

SUMMER SE.SSION
SHOWS BIG G IA
IN REGISTRATIOiN

Florence

Harding Spends Eve
Of Funeral With Her Deadj

_
I
.

LIT

:00 MORIE THAN
y EAft

EN ROLLED;
LAST

Marion, Aug. 9-(By A.P.)-Flor-
ence Kling Harding was alone tonight
with her beloved dead ,awaiting g'rave-
ly and calmly tomorrow when he will
be taken to the nation's newest shrine,
behind locked gates in the unpreten-
tious Marion city cemetery.
The return from Washington to her
girlhood companions, her friends, and
most intimate associates, failed to
weaken her resolute determination to

hearse, arriving at the home of George
T. Harding, Sr., and alighted just as
the casket was being. placed in po-
sition in the parlor.
MYRICK SCORE SUESS

GERMAN POLICY.-IN
RUAOCONTINUE'
SAYS CHANCELLORl

CUNO FIRM
ANCE

FOR PASSIVE RESIST.
BEFORE REICH.-
STAG

WILL BE LAID T
FINAL REST TODA
THOUSANDS VIEW FACE OF LATE
CHIEF FOR LAST
TIME
PROCESSION TO GRAVE
TO START AT 2 O'CLOCK
Simplicity Will Mark Services to be
Held in Marion Ceme-
tery
Marion, Ohio, Aug. 9-(By A.P.)-A
one-time country editor came back to-
day to sleep for a night again under
his father's roof in Marion, and with
him cime the grief of the nation, of
the world, that he was dead.
Warren Harding was back again
among the neighborly folk of his home
town. The brief day of his greatness
was but a memory treasured by the
nation. His life work was done; the
aloofness of his high place ended.
The home folk who had. held back
when last he came to them awed with
the majesty "that doth hedge a King,"
now came eagerly to look their last
on his dead face peaceful with the
calm of eternity.,
Thousands .View Body
The draped flag was laid back and
the long, cover lifted to show once
more the still features. Then the door
was free to all who might wish to
come and the sorrowful procession of
old friends and neighbors, of men and
women and children from all around
began its silent walk. Until late in
the night nothing was placed in the
way of the thousands who came thus
and again tomorrow there will be an
opportunity for those who could not
come today to pay their respects to
a dead neighbor. Then will follow the
simple services; the funeral that will
be no more striking, save for the
thousands who crowd the grounds te
witness it, and a great place in life
one among those thousands hold than
that of any other simple American
and the long days of the home com-
ing from San Francisco will be over.
There were striking contrasts in
the scene here at Marion today from
that in Washington yesterday. There,
no mournful draperies covered' the
great goveriment buildings and the
tokens of sorrow of houses and store'
were a rarity. It was not that Wash-
ington felt no sorrow but that prece-
dent long established is against the
draping of the nation's capitol.
Mairion in Black
Here in Marion the fiowi.ng of black
draperies is everywhere and hardly a
house but has the pictured face of
the dead President in the window al-
ways with a bit of crepe or mourn-
ing body about it. Far and wide over
Ohio it is the same.
Service to be Brief
The only funeral services here will
be at the cemetery and they will be
extremely brief and simple in accord-
ance with the wish of Mrs. Harding.
Only relatives and'intimate friends
will make up the small party going
to the cemetery. Even newspapermen
will be excluded from the services at
the tomb.
When the funeral train arrived
here, the casket was taken immediate-
ly to the home of the dead president's
father, Dr. George T. Harding, Sr.,
in East Center St. The trip from the

station to the father's home was made
in a hearse, not on a military cais-
son as yesterday in Washington.
Body Lies in State
At his father's home the body lay'-
in private until 2 o'clock this after-
noon. From then until 10 o'clock to-
night the public was permitted to look
upon the kindly face of the former
Marion newspaper publisher.
Again, tomorrow, from 9 a. m., un-
til 1 p. in., the public will have a
last opportunity to pass by the bier
of Mr. Harding. At 2 o'clock the fun-
(Continued on Page Three)
WILDE COMEDY TO.
BE GIVEN TONIGHT
The class in play production will
present "The Importance of Being
Ernest" tonight at 8 o'clock in Uni-
versity hall. This is one of Oscar
Wilde's most popular plays and this
is the first time if has been presented

PHARMACY UNIT ONLY
ONE TO SHOW DECREASE

IS

OUTSTANDING

FIGURE IN

Graduate School Second Largest
Numbers With 586 Siu-
dents

bi keep strength to the end. To the
many who came to cheer and ease
her burden of sorrow, Mrs. Harding
spoke her thanks but firmly declin-

Three thousand, fifty-four students
are registered in the University this

ed to pass on to them even the small-
est of the troubles that were hers to

summer, according to statistics given bear.

out by Dean E. H. Krause yesterday
afternoon. This is a considerable in-
crease over the total number of 2,786
students in the Summer session last
year, ad a tremendous increase over
the 1,301 registered in the University
in 1918,.
The College of Literature, Science,,
and the Arts has 1,172 students enroll-
ed, an increase of 51 over last sum-
mer's record. The Graduate school
has the next largest enrollment, there
being a total of 586, an increase of 100
over last year. The School of.l{ duca-
tion was organized as an independent
unit in 1921, and since that time it has

Mrs. Harding was the last to step
from the funeral car when the train
arrived in the Marion station. The
casket already had been transferred
to the hearse. The eight cabinet offl-
cers and other Washington officials
had taken their places on the plat-
form. Then Mrs. Harding came down
the car ,steps. and Marion saw her.
She was not the smiling and cheer-
ful woman Marion had grown to know
so well in the past seven years.
They entered the automobiles and
'occupied- the third car behind the

PRESENTATION GIVEN
IN EAST
Dr. Kenneth 0. Myrick, instructor
in the psychology department, was
the outstanding figure in "The Par-
able of the Good Samaritan" pageant
dramatized by a group of Unitarian
laymen before the Institute of Religi-
ous Education at Star Island near .
Boston, Mass., Wednesday evening.
Dr. Myricks part was that of a
priest and according to spectators heJ
portrayed the part like a professional!
actor.
British Empire Outdoes Babel
London, Aug. 9.-(By A.P.)- There
are spoken in the British Empire to-
day more tongues than prevailed at
the time of the destruction of the Tow-
er of Babel, according to Prof. Daniel
Jones, an authority on languages.
In the entire empire, he says, there
are from 800 to 1,000 distinct lan-
guages. India alone has 500.
Rail Official Dies at Michigan Resort'
Ludington, Aug. 9.-(By A.P.)-Dav-
id Goodwin of Louisville, Ky., diedl
in bed at his Epworth summer cot-;
tage. Death was caused by heart dis-
ease. Mr. Goodwin had been an offl-
cial of the Louisville & Nashville rail-
road for many years. A widow sur-
vives.
DAILY WILL OBSERVE
PERIOD IN MEMORY OF
PRESIDENT HARDING

SAYS MUCH IN BRITISH
. . REPLY IS "IMPOSSIBLE"
Urges Determination as Sole Hope
of German People Against
Occuption
Berlin, Aug. 9.-(By A.P.)- Chan-
cellor Cuno's address to the reichstag
in which he declared that passive re-
sistance in the Ruhr and Rheinland
would continue to be supported by the
nation, has been received as the most
depressing statement yet made to the
national legislature by the present
government.
Speech Disappointing
The coalition parties regard it as
a disappointing utterance. The chan-
cellor was visibly disconcerted by the
boisterious heckling of the Commun-
ist members, who, when he arose to
speak, hailed him as "traitor," "swind-
ler" and "president of the Stinnes
company." -
He was continually interrupted as
the address progressed, but when it
was finished there was prolonged ap-.
plause. Asserting that the British
draft reply to the last German repara-
tion note contained much that was im-
possible of fulfillment, Herr Cuno said
it appeared England had gone extra-
ordinarily far in her concessions to
the French viewpoint.
Resistance Necessary
"It is necessary to continue with. all'
our strength, passive resistance, free
from mad acts of violence and, ter-
ror," he said, "and to support actively
from the unoccupied territory the pop-
ulation which is persevering in a pas-
sive resistance of its own will."
He reiterated that Germany would
not "abandon a German 'and and be-
tray fellow countrymen.
Repeating the French statement that
the Ruhr was to be freed only when
the last pfennig was paid and pointing
(Continued on Page Three)
State School Head Asks Observance
Lansing, Aug. 9.-(By A.P.)-Super-

been showing a steady increase in its
enrollment. This summer its total is
353 students, while last summer it was
only 227.
The number of students taking the
course in library methods is 98 this
summer; an increase of 17 over lastI
summers' enrollment. The Colleges ofJ
Engineering and Architecture have
514 students in the Summer session;
the Medical school had 277, and the
Law sphool showed a total of 163 stu-
dents this summer. The College of'
Pharmacy registered 18 students this
summer, a decrease of four over last
summer. Sixty-five students are en-
rolled in the biological station for
this Summer session. This is an in-
creasT of 15 over te figures given
out last summer.
a
Starts $50,000 Suit for Loss of Foot,
Jackson, Aug. 8-(By A.P.)-Wil-
liam Moon, 38, a Michigan Central
brakeman has instituted suit here1
against the railroad company, claim-,
ing damages of $50,000 for the loss
of his left foot while at work in the
company's yards at Kalamazoo on;

MEMORIAL PROGRAM,
1. a) Reading of proclamation
issued by President Coolidge.
b) Introduction of Judge
George Sample, chairman of
the meeting.
Mayor George E. Lewis.
2. Brief remarks by Judge Sam-
pie as chairman of the meet-
ing.
3. Reading of se'riptural passageI
and prayer.
Rev. R., Erward Sayles,
Pastor of the First Baptist
church.
4. Solo--"Lead Kindly Light."
Mr. R. Winfield Adams,
Accompanied by Prof. Earl
Mqore.
5. Memorial address.
Prof. Thomas H. Reed.
6. America-first and last stan-
zas.
The audience.
7. Benediction.
Rev. E. C. Stellhorn,
Pastor 'of Zion Lutheran
church.
The audience to remain stand-
ing during the sounding of taps.

In accordance with the pro-
clamation by Mayor George E.
Lewis, the Summer Michigan
Daily will observe the period
from 2 until 6 o'clock this after-
noon set aside in memory of
President Harding.
Advertisers are requested to
transact their business in the
Daily offices before 2 o'clock this
afternoon. Staff members will
report promptly at or before 1
o'clock.

II

CALL
rTTltKTIC

intendent of Public Instruction Thom-I
as Johnson has written or wired all
county commissioners in Michigan
asking that if it is possible Friday
Afternoon be set aside in obvrvance
of the death of President harding.

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