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August 09, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-09

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.. . : .- - - -. - ...- : . . : - - -.- - . -- . - - .: . . . . . : . . . . .: ::,::. .. . . :: ..; . w -;

.,.-.. .

Y F

Y OFFICTIA L BULLEI
in the Bulletin is constructive notice to'all members of the
Copy received in the Ofice of the Summer Session um.il
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. in. daturday.)
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1923 Number 121

Swimmer
Lake.

Crosses
Erie Alone

HARING'S BODY:STARTS
'. JOURNEY TO MARfIN

soon after the casket had been plac- to be with the dead to the lasi
ed aboard the funeral train. She Marion. The group of official moi
came direct from the White House. ers stood bare headed on be p
Other nmbers of the party who tra- form. A hand waved in silent
velled with the dead president on his nal. Without a sound of bell
last journey that ended with such whistle the train began to move si
suddenness were ail aboard the train ly, slowly down the track.

3

ro All Members of the University:°
In token of respect to President Harding; and in conformity with the
ederal proclamation, declaring Friday, August 10, a day of mourning, Un-
versity classes and other exercises will be sispended and administrative
ffices will be closed between the hours of one and six, Friday afternoon,
August 10. A memorial service is to be held in Hill auditorium at four
Dclock at the call of Mayor G. E. Lewis. This service is open to both
members of the University and citizens of Ann Arbor.
For the President, F. E. ROBBINS,'
Assistant to the President.
EDWARD H, KRAUS,
Dean of the Summer Session.
PAUL BUCKLEY,,
Assistant Secretary."
techanical Engineering:
Students taking course M. E. 20A will report progress on their work,
his afternoon, August, 9, Room 333.
R. S. HAWLEY.
Change of Date of Conference and Lecture:,
The Conference on Social Sciences in the Public schools and the
ecture on "The Origin of Man" by Mr. R. C. Hussey, scheduled for 2 and
5 p. m, respectively on Friday afternoon, August 10, will be held at the cor-
responding hours on Monday, August 13, in the Auditorium of the Natural
Science Building.
EDWARD H. KRAUS.
Methods of Modern Language Teaching: '
The lecture on Methods of Modern Language Teaching by Mr. H. E.
Moore, Senior Modern Language Master in the Isleworth County School,
[ondon, this afternoon, Thursday, at 3 p. m., Room 200, South Wing, will
be "The Use of the Phonograph in Language Teaching," demon-
stration).. Mr. Moore is one of the recognized leaders in Eng-
land of the younger school of modern language teachers. He
s preparing a work on "Modernism in Language Teaching" and is anxious
to have the reaction of our teachers to his ideas. Opportunity for discus-
sion will be offered, and such discussion is greatly desired by Mr. Moore.
A. G. CANFIELD.
School of Education Staff:
The staff of the School of Education is invited to an informal conference
to be held at 7 o'clock, Thursday, August 9th, in Room 105, Tappan Hall.
C. O. DAVIS.
Special Lecture: .
A special lecture has been arranged too late to be included in the week-
ly bulletin, which will be given at 7 o'clock, Thursday, August 9, in Room
200, South Wing of University Hall, by Mr. H. E. Moore, Senior
Modern Language Master at the Isleworth County School, London, Eng-
land. Mr. Moore will demonstrate and illustrate the use that may be made
of French folk songs in the teaching of French. The lecture will be of spe-
3ial interest to teachers and students of modern language.
A. G. CANFIELD.
Transcripts of Records:,
Students wishing transcipts of their Summer Session records sent to
other institutions or school officers should make immediate application to
he office of the School or College in which they are registered, in order
;o avoid delay.
T. E. RANKIN.

(Continued from Page One)
Washington, Aug. 8-(By A.P.)-
Warren Harding left Washington to-
night, forever. His short, eventful
moment of power and heavy care was
ended; his eternity of rest begun.
Yesterday the flooding tide of des-
E W E tiny bore him eastward to take up
the challenge of leadership the mem-
iers of his countrymen had thrown
to him. Today that tide ebbed west-
ward again after the setting sun.
E@ The singing rails bore him back
to the quiet town in Ohio whence
he came.
When the doors of the capitol clos-
ed, more than 35,000 persons had pass-
i "ed through that corridor of flowers]
it is estimated and as many more
were turned back after hours in the
rslw moving line, but the departure
for Marion would not wait and the
:zr great doors were shut.
In a few minutes the casket was
out and down to the caisson while
Carbis Walker, first man to swim the troopers raised their sabres in sa-
across Lake Erie, smiling in vic. lute to the raising guns, and every
tory.. figure was erect. At the station the
Lorain, 0., Aug. 8.-With nothing casket was lifted down to be carried
but the sun and the moon to guide out again and gently placed in the
him, Carbis Walker, Cleveland swim- position where tens of thousands of
mer, accomplished the unheard of Americans saw it on the long home-
feat of swimming across Lake Erie. ward journey of sorrow from San
The distance covered was 30 miles. Francisco. There were no ceremon-
The course was from Point Pelee, Ont., mes. The nation's farewell had been said
to Lorain. Mrs. Harding reached the Station
Over practically the whole distance by Mrs. Harding's personal request
Walker was accompanied only by a
small rowboat, as the launch Argus
lost him after putting into Put-in-Bay
to wire press reports of the start.
What makes Walker's feat more reG-F
markable was that he had to steer
his way by the sun and moon and di-
rections given by passing craft. The
compass he had relied upon and his A BAG OF MC 4
physician were in the Argus. ~A ~ ~

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I

of Exa inations:

/

he final examinations in the Schools and Colleges on the eight weeks
s will be held Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, August 15, 16, and 17
rding to the following schedule:

WHAT'S GOING ON
THURSDAY
5:00- Lecture, "The Adventures of
Grouping School Children." (Illus-
trated.) Supt. F. G. Pickell, Mont-
clai, N. J.
3:00-Lecture in the auditorium of
the Natural Science building. Prof.
ll. E. Moore speaks on "French1
Folk Songs."
8:00--Oneract plays, The class jn Play
Production under the supervision of
Prof.,R. D. T. Holhister. Auditorium
of University hall. Admission will
be charged.
FItDAY
,2:00-Conference On Social Sciences
in the Public Schools.
i:00-Lecture, "The Origin of Man."
(Illustrated). Mr. R. C. Hussey.
8:00-Oscar Wilde's "The Iiiipu-rtanc
of Being Earnest." The class in
Play Production, under the super-
vision of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister.
Auditorium of University hall. Ad-
mission wil be charged.
J-NOTICES
Summer session students desirig to
use the Union Building this summer
must obtain card at desk. A di-
rectory of all students has been com-
piled.
j AT T HE THEATERS

W

J j

/'

r

CONFIDE]

AHR 9S

UNIVERS I T
BOOKSTORES

's of Recitation

Tine of Examination

..........................Friday.....................10-12
8 .............. . % Thursday ...................... 8-10
9........................Wednesday ....................2- 4
10 .........................Thursday....................4-6
11........................Friday......................8-10
1 ............................. Friday ......................... 2- 4
2.........................Thursday....................2- 4
3.........................Wednesday.................4-6
4 .... ..... ......Thursday.... ................10-12
Irregular .... ...................Friday ...............4- 6
All classes will continue to meet regularly until Wednesday noon,
August 15.
E. H. KRAUS.
Four One-Act Plays Tonight:
Members of the casts of the four one-act plays to be presented for the
public by the classes in Play Production in University Hall tonight will re-
port for make-up at 7 o'clock in order that the program may start promptly
at 8 o'clock as scheduled. Ushers and ticket takers should be in their
places not later than 7:30.
R. D. T. HOLLISTER.
Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest":
The public production of Oscar Wilde's three-act comedy, "The Import-
ance of Being Earnest", will be given by the Classes in Play Production as
seheduled for Friday evening, August 10, promptly at 8 o'clock in the au-
ditorium of University Hall. Tickets may be secured at Wahr's or at the

Wanted-
men to find Ike answer

I

11

N

Screen-Today

THIS is written to the man who loves to seek the
unknown quantity. He is the kind of labora-
tory worker who ventures into untried fields of ex-
periment, rather than the man who tests materials.
Industry has need. of both types, but of the
former there is a more pressing demand.
College men may have been discouraged from
pursuing pure research. In this highly practical
age it may seem there is little room for work
which does not have an "immediate dollars and
cents application. But such is not the case.
The pure research man is the pathfinder. With-
out him our fountain of knowledge would dry up
His findings in themselves may be uncornmerciali
but they establish a field for others to develop
Volta worked out the crude voltaic pile- unim-
portant until other men improved and applied
it. And so with Papin in the field of steam, or

I

I

. 1

R. D. T. HOLLISTER.

ARION AWAITS ITS DEAD years will have a prominent place in
HERO; TROOPS PATROL ROADS the funeral procession.
Although there will be no military
,pomp in connection with the proces-

Majestic-Marquerite de la Motte
and Marjorie Daw in "Wand-
ering Daughters"; also Regin-
ald Denny in "The Leather
Pushers."
Wuerth - Johnnie Walker and
Eileen Percy in "The Fourth
Musketeer."
Orpheum - Conway Tearle in
Marooned Hearts."

(Conutinued fron; Page One)
[arion Friday. Stores and business
laces will remain closed throughout
he day. The Marion Star, for years
wned and published by Mr. Harding
rd his wife, will suspend publication
or the day in -order that the employs
tay take part in the last rites over Mr.
arding's body.
Printers, edito4s,: .reporters, office'
mployes and newsboys who worked
ith the Hardings on the Star for

sion or the funeral services at the
cemetery, 3,000 Ohio National Guardf
troops will arrive today to preserve
order and direct the heavy traffic. One
field hospital company will care . for
visitors who may be overcomel by the
excessive hot and sultry weather pre-
vailing here.
Let "Jimmie the adtager" find it"
Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.
A very direct and cheap form of
advertising-classifieds. -Adv.

the interest of Elec.
,trical Development bry
an Institution that will
ie helped4y what.-
ever helps the
Industry.

I

Stage-This Week

Lavoi
Me
last. I
labora
will a]
for th(

sier in chemistry.
n of the inquiring slant of mind, stick to your
In post graduate study, on the faculty, in the
aory of some industrial organization, there
lways be an "X" to baffle other men and call
e keenest thought of you blazers of the trail.
Elecirico ai'y

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