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August 09, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-09

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

L. XIV. No. 41

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1923

PRICE FIVE C

_ _
f r

ENGLISH TEICHING
PEI00 TOO SHORT,
DECGLARESMOOlR E
ASSERTS MORE TIME SHOULD BE
DEVOTED TO SUBJECT IN .
AMERICAN SCHOOLS
SAYS TRANSLATION
TOO MUCH STRESSED
Ability to Read Rather Than Under-
standing of Text, of Major
Importance
H. E. Moore, senior modern lang-
uage master of the Isleworth County
School, London, began his talk on
the"Psychology of Translation" yes-
terday afternoon, by giving a short
description of the new method of
teaching pupils proper pronouncia-
tion of modern languages.
English Youth Begins Study Early
He stated that this method which
has been agred upon is difficult to
apply in the limited space of time
given over to the teaching of modern
languages in the American schools.
Moore said that in England pupils
from the age of eleven on into the
'niversities were taught and develop-
ed in the correct manner.
1°e said that the first requisite in
teaching of pronounciation was the
correct position of the tongue, which
ha much more to do with the pro-
pounciation of French vowels than in
English. Muscular consciousness must
be developed in the pupils. English
vowels are all dipthongs and one of
the practical devices used to overcome
the difficulty of pronounciation in an-
other language is to sing the vowels,
as this aids in showing how wrong
theyjare by the viciousnessof their
sounds.
Mr. Moore continued by saying that
too much translation was required of
pupils in school, that it was stressed
too much in examinations, and that it1
was the most difficult part of a for-
eign language to master.
He stated that the ultimate aim of]
teaching a modern language is to
impart the ability to read, not in the
American sense, but the power of
grasping the subject matter of thei
text. "Translation," quoted Mr.,
Moore, from an, eminent authority ont
the subject, "is an obstacle to the1
ability to read," .
Mr. Moore quoted many noted writ-
ers who are agreed on the fact that
too much translation is taught int
the schools, He gave a personal ex-
perience as an ex.ample. Translation,
he said, was not required in business,e
but only ' the ability to grasp the
meaniing of important matters imme-
diately.
UHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
SUSPENDS FOR HALF HOUR
Chicago, Aug. 8,-(By A.P.)- All
business on the Chicago board of trade
was ordered suspended at 11 a. m. to-
day, the hour of the state funeral ser-,
vices for President Harding at the
capitol in Washington, for a period of
30 minutes.
Fuller Confession to Amaze Wall St.
New York, Aug. 8.-Revlations ynade
ih reported confessions to Federal At-
tgrney Hayward by E. M. Fuller and
William F. McGee, confessed stock
bucketeers, are likely to rock the fi-
nancial section of New York to its

foundations. Carl E. Whitney, nw
counsel for the two former stock
brokers, declared today.
GALLOPING DOMINOES
HIS STUFF!
Said trotting young Domi was\;
in search of a nice suite for the
coming school year. He hopped
his bipeds and came tearing to
the Dally Office. An ad for two
days and he now says
CALL'
JIMMIE
THE AD. TAKER

Slated To Take
Secretary Post
Under Coolidge)

SET FOR 4 O'CLOCK
Final Tribute to Dead President Will
be Held in Hill Auditor-
ium

Man Who "Found"
Coolidge Is Now
His "Col. House"~

MRION AWAITS ITS DEAD HERO;
THOUSANDS PAY FINAL HOMAGI
IN NATIONAL CAPITOL ROTUNI

MAtOR ISSUES PROCLAMATION.
ASKING CLOSING OF STORES
Memorial services for the late Pres-1

i

ident Warren G. Harding will be held
at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon, in
Hill auditorium. The local services
will be held at the same hour as the
final rites for the dead president are
being solemnized at Marion.

PROCLAMATION

Edward T. Clark
Edward T. Clark, who served as sec-
retary to President Coolidge when the
new chief executive was governor of
Massachusetts and then when Cool-
idge was vice-president, is expected to
continue in that capacity for Coolidge
in the White House, succeeding George
B. Christian.
WELLS TO PLA
"CHICK" EVANS
Amateur Golf Champon, University
Instrnctor, Accepts Bid to
Exhibition Match
WILL MEET VETERAN OPPONENT
ON COURSE NEAR KALAMAZOO
Carleton Wells, amateur golf cham-
pion of Michigan yesterday accepted
an invitation from the Gull Lake
Country Cub, near Kalamazoo, to
play in an exhibition match next
Tesday afternoon with Chick Evans,
who has won more golf medals and
championships than any other golfer
in the game. Wells, who only last
week won the state championship for
the second time, said that this would
be merely an exhibition mpatch and
would perhaps be a foursome.
A curious coincidence of this match
is that Wells caddied for Evans when
the latter was just starting on his
championship career, ten or twelve
years ago', and the outcome is watch-
ed with interest, although there are
no titles at stake,
Old Instruments
Best, Says Wier
By Margaret Geddes
"Old instruments are the only good
instruments," asserted Prof. M. C.
Wier in his lecture-recital in Univer-
sity hall last night, "the' new ones
ae no good." The Italians claim to
have made the finest cellos and the
first ones. The Germans, however,
are believed to have been the earliest
manufacturers of the instruments. The
oldest cello is dated 1493 and the last
great one is dated 1770.
Student Dies Of
Heart Disease
Wiliam M. Adams, '25, a medicine
student died suddenly at Manitou
Beach, Devils Lake, Sunday, of
heart disease. Funeral services were
held yesterday at 2 o'clock, in Litch-
field, ,
Adams had been a student at the
University for the last five years. He
is survived by one sister, Miss Victor-
ia Adams of Litchfield.
PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS f
WILL PERFORM TONIGHT
A series of four one-act plays will
be given at 8 o'clock tonight in Uni-
versity hall under the direction of
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister by his classes
in play production and play direction.
The plays given under Professor
Hollister's direction were received as
one of the best dramatic essays of

I Friday, Aug. 10, having been
| designated by President Coolidge f
I as a day of mourning throughout
the nation for the late President F
Warren G. Harding, the city of
I Ann Arbor will unite in a me- F
morial service at Hill auditorium
at 4 p.im,
I therefore request that all
business places be closed from |
2 p. m. to 6 p. in. and every F
citizen attend the service. The f
F various clubs and lodges are ask-
ed to attend in a body if they so F
desie.
(Signed):
!GEORG 1. LNWIS, F
Mayor,
I I
Reed to Speak
Mayor George E. Lewis will open
the meeting by reading President
Calvin Coolidge's proclamation. Judge
George W. Sample will preside and
Prof. Thomas IT, Reed will deliver a
short address.
Members of Ross Granger post,
Spanish War Veterans, and members
of the American Legion will meet in
the G. A. R. rooms of the city hall
at 3 o'clock Friday 'afternoon and
march to Hill auditorium.
A letter from Alfred Fischer, vice
president of the Ann Arbor Chamber
of Commerce, urges that each class
of business men send a representa-
tive body to Hill auditorium, where
special sections will be reserved for
them, Special sections will also be
reserved for the Boy Scouts, who will
attend in a body.
Banks Will Close
All gasoline filling stations will be
closed from 4 to 5 o'clock and the
Majestic and Wuerth theaters will
be closed from 2:30 to 5 o'clock, Fri-
day.
There will be no afternoon mail del
ivery, and the windows at the main
office and the Arcade will be closed
during the afternoon. In keping with
the governor's proclamation, all
banks in the city will be closed all
day
MOVIE INFLUENCED BY'
DRAMA KIRKLAND SYS
David Kirkland, a well known mo-
tion picture director of Los Angeles
spoke on "The Art of the Photo-Play"
before Prof. John R. Brumm's @las'
in written criticism yesterday mor-
'the principal "theme of Mr. Kirk-
land's_ leture was his definition of
the photo play from a purely physi-
cal sandpontI He defined it as
"a number of strips of motion picture
film spliced together which, when
flashed on the screen tell a story that
is entertaining." .
"The photo play is, at the present
time, influenced by the dramamore
than anything else", he explained,
"and although the photo play has not
the possibilities of the speaking stage,
still pictorial art can be developed
more than the legitimate stage. When
a mechanical medium is interposed in
art, the difficulties are multiplied,
but the motion picture has many
compensations, such as the close-up,
and greater variety."
The historical development of mo-
tion pictures was also discussed by
Mr. Kirkland, beginning with the
first picture by Edward Muybridge in
1878, up to the invention by Edison
and the recent development of the
photo play.

f Frank W. Stearns
Frank W.'Stearns, Boston merchant-
millionaire, the man who "brought
out" Calvin Coolidge and literally put
him in the governor's office in Massa.-
chusetts and then put him forward as
a vice-presidential candidate, becomes
the "Colonel House" of Coolidge's ad-
ministration. Stearns is Coolidge's
closest friend. The Boston man join-
ed the Coolidge party a few hours aft-
er the new President began his duties.
YOST LEAVES FOR
HARDING FU NERAL
Director of Intercollegiate Athletics
and Coach Little Will Motor to
Ohio City
OTHER UNIVERSITY MEMBERS
WILL ATTEND FINAL RITESt
Coach Fielding H. Yost and Coach
George R. Little left yesterday after-!
noon for Marion, O., where they willt
attend the late President Harding's
funeral Friday. Coach Yost has been1
a warm friend of the late PresidentE
for more than 25 years. En route!
they were present at an alumni meet-
ing in Toledo at the Hotel Socar lastt
night, and this noon will be thec
guests of Michigan alumni in Lima.-
In the evening they will be in Ada,t
0.; where Coach Yost formerly at-1
tended the Ohio Normal school. f
After returning from Marion Fri-
day, Coach Yost will leave Sunday to
spend several weeks in his former
home at Nashville, Tenn. He will go
via Chicago, where he willmeet Mon-
day several of his old and present
players, Tom Hammond, Quarterback
Uteritz, and Halfback Steger.-
Graeme O'Goran, grad., Oscar Lake,
24E, and Frederick Bodey, '24E, will
also attend the funeral leaving this
morning. They will travel by rail.
O'Goran will act as special corre-
pondent for the Michigan Summer
Daily at Marion.
WANDEINGS' OF PRESS
DESCRIB9E BYlPr. rOOT
"The first printing press to be used
in the Northwest had a varied careerj
in many parts of the world, so I shall
call it the "Wanderer," said Prof. A.
S. Root, librarian of Oberlin college,I
in his lecture yesterday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium.
He described the eventful trip of1
this press from Boston, first to Hon-
olulu, where it did good service, and
then to the Pacific coast from where it .
was taken up the Columbia river and,
then transported by muleback to the
missionary settlement of Marcus
Whitman an' Spaulding his associate
and used by them to print Bibles,,
hymn books which they used in theire
task jof trying to conv'ert the In-
dians.
Professor Root has several of the
original Bibles, chapters of Bibles andt
hymn books which these courageous
missionaries had printed.

TENS OF THOUSANDS VIEW BODY
OF LATE CHIEF FOR LAST
. TIME
SIMPLICITY MARKS
IMPRESSIVE RITES
Taft and Wilson, Only Living Former
Presidents, Take Placcs in
Cortege of Sorrow
Washington, Aug. 8.-(By A.P.) -
Tens of thousands of his silent coun-
trymen paid solemn honor to the
memory of their dead leader today as
the body of Warren G. Harding lay in
state in the rotunda of the national
capitol from whence it will be remov-
ed tonight for burial at Marion, O,
Friday afternoon.
With Gen. John J. Pershing riding
ahead, the marching thousands of the
escort led the way to the capitol build-
ing, the steel of their bayonets glit-
tering above them. Soldiers, sailors,
marines and citizen soldiers-all were
there and behind them came the new
President, still bowed in grief that his
high office came at such a price.
Crowds Silent
Came also two men who before him
had held that office, one to be strick-
en and so crippled in illness that he
might not give himself as he would
to the sorrowful duty of the day. Be-
hind these, in endless array, marched
the great body of American citizenry
and the men who keep the wheels of
a great government going in the huge
silent buildings about.
Military bands interspersed in the;
columns played old, old hymns withe
stir and comfort. The hush and dimY
mystery of last night, 'when the flag-
draped casket came to its brief space I
of quiet in the White House was lack-
ing, but there was no sound or move-a
ment in the great crowds which lined
the way until that fateful burden un-
der its colorful glorious bunting hadt
been carried by on silent wheels to beI
lifted to the catafalque in the greatv
stone chamber of the capitol rotunda.f
There, in keeping with the simplicity
of the man who lay dead, the funeral
services were of brief, impressive na
ture. Afterward, In its place of hoi-
or beneath the dome, the body was tof
lie until night fall, while thousands -,
upon thousands filed past the bier 7
with bent, uncovered head to bid
farewell to the upright, kindly man
so soon to leave Washington forever.a
(iContinued on Page Four) e
e e aa
UNIVERSTYGRADUTE
ISA.,R.e1 EXECUTIE
Frederick B. Lyon, '23, of Detroit, -
has just completed 17 months service
as director of the American Relief1
Administration warehouses in Mos-
cow according to advices reaching
here. Lyon took charge of the Boin-
ia warehouses during the winter oft
1921-22 and did remarkable work in
renovating the shipping and packing
rooms, equipping the offices, install- 1
ing modern machinery, and the read-,
justing of the Russian personnel. Y
On the occasion of his farewell to
his employes, Lyons was presented
with a gold cigaret case, a blanket
toss, a silver samovr and various1
other articles expressing the appre-
ciation of the "mujiks" and the es- I
teem in which they held their direc-
The A. R. A. warehouses were the
largest of their kind in Russia and
the only warehouses in the world
handling such large qua~tities of re-
lief supplies . In 18 months of oper-
ation the A. R. A. handled 29,515 cars1

of freight. .
Mark Lower Again
London, Aug, 8.-The German mark;
was offered at 15,000,000 to the poundi
sterling this afternoon, with no buy-
ers. 'After the bank holiday of Mon-I
day, the mark opened at a record low
of 9,000,000 to the pound, but slump-{
ed rapidly. Fifteen million to thel
pound made the. mark about 3,333,33S,
to the dollar.

AILITARY SPLENDOR
LACKING IN HOME
SERVICES

WILL LIE IN STATE
AT HOME OF FATHER
Ohioans Will Be Given Last View of
1)4&d Citizen and Leader To-
day and Tomorrow
Marior, 'O, Aug .-8.(y A.P.)-
While the nation, through its secog-
nized leaders, was paying official re-
spect to ,the memory of Warren G.
Harding in Washington today, the late
President's home folks and neighbors
cotninued their plans for ,the final
simple funeral services here Friday
afternoon..
Simplicity approaching severeness
E will characterize the last rites here.
This is the wish of Mrs. Harding.
Will Arrive at 9 O'clek
When the body arrives here about
9 o'clock, central standard time, to-
morrow from Washington it will be
taken immediately to the home of Dr.
George T. Harding, Sr., the President's
father. From 2 until 10 p. m. tomor-
row and again from 9 a. in. until 1 p.
in. the following day. Ohioans will be
given a last opportunity to view the
face of their dead friend and lead-
er. -
Then, on Friday. afternoon, without
F military pomp,'the body will be borne
tendermy from the home to the cem-
etery, where brief and simple funeral
services, conducted by local ministers,
will be held. First in the funeral pro-
eossion following the hearse will come
members of the Harding family, then
the President of the United States;
mebers of the cabinet and other high
officials and then Mr. Harding's friends
and neighbors.
Everyone wishing to do so has been
invited by direction of Mrs. Harding
to take part in the funeral procession,
It is Mrs. Harding's wish that those
who kne wher husband best-the folks
from Ohi-shall have part in the fun-
eral program.
IFollowing the brief ceremonies 'at
the cemetery the body of President
Harding will be entombed. The home
folks will disperse and President Cool-
idge and his official party, together
with Mrs. Harding4 will retu to
Washington.
The only reminder that the body of
a President of the United States lies
entombed in Marion will be the milit-
ary guard, which will be maintained
at the tomb for the customary six
months' period. The simple funeral
services here promise to be participat-
ed in by thousands of the dead Pres
ident's friends from all oved Ohio.
Marion is full to overflowing today
and thousands are planning to arrive'
tomorrow and Friday. So great will
be the crowd that state officials have
arranged to patrol all roads for miles
to prevent automobile accidents. Many
special trains will brng large delega-
tions of Ohioans while nearly every
city will send special representatives.
Among those having prominent,
places at the burial services will be
Ohio newspaper publishers, who are
members of the Associated Ohio Dail-
ies, an organization in which Mr. Hard-
ing, as publisher of the Marion tSar,
took an active part.- The editors will
gather at Marion club early Friday
afternoon and go to the Harding home
in a body.
Press Men Given Place
All business activity will close I
(Continued on Page Four)
MOURNING DAY CAUSES CHANGE
IN LECTURE AND CONFERENCE
Owing to the fact that Friday has,
been proclaimed a day of mourning
for President Harding the conference

on Social Sciences in the public high
schools and the lecture on the "Or-
igin of Man,'; by Mr. R. C. Hussey,
scheduled. for that date have been
postponed.
The conference will be held at 2
o'clock on Monday, Aug. 13, and the
lecture at 5 o'clock that same after-
noon in the Natural Science auditor-
ium.

WILL
TOWN

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