100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 04, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LC"k1 L

PSES

OF MRS. HARDING

i

I Ii

NEW EXECUTIVE
REA1CHES CAPITAL
(Continued from Page One)
where he will maintain his residence
and will lay out ground work of his
administration while the executive
offices at the White House are being
put in order for him.
Because of repair work in progress
there, and in deference to Mrs. Har-
ding, it will be several days before
the President and the new first,lady
of the land will take charge of the
executive mansion..
Calvin Coolidge, who, in the home
of his father, Joseph C. Coolidge of
Plymouth, Vermont, took the oath of
office which made him president of
the United States at 2:47 o'clock yes-
terday morning is the first chief ex-
ecutive of this nation since Chester
Alan Arthur to come from New Eng-
land. He is the fifth president to
come from that section of the coun-
try. John Adams, the second pres-
ident, his son John Quincey, Adams,
Franklin Pierce the fourteenth presi-
dent, and- Chester Alan Arthur, the
twenty first president together with
Coolidge make up a quintet of New
Ehglanders who have attained the
highest honor that the American na-
tion can bestow upon a man.
Is 62 Years Old
The new president was born July

4, 1872 in Plymouth, Vt., the same
small New England village where he
took his oath of office early .yester-
day morning. He has back of him
many generations of Massachusetts
ancestry who have served their coun-
try in various capacities. His an-
cestors were Puritans who came tol
this country and settled Watertown
In 1630.
Progress in Politics Rapid
It was in 1899 when he was elected
to the city council that he started1
his political career. From this po-
sition he progressed steadily upward
through the. offices of city solicitor,
mayor, membership in the House of
Representatives and of the Senate of
Massachusetts, serving as president
of that body, and then as a lieutenant-
governor until he .was elected gov-,
ernor and 1920, vice president of the
United States. In the more than 20
years he gave to these duties, his
time was almost exclusively devoted
to the problems of public affairs. On-
ly incdientally did he turn to law, al-'

though he always maintained an
fice in Northampton.
Distinguished as Governor
It was as governor of Massac
setts that he distinguished himC
and brought himself before the e
of the constitutents. He was elec
for the first time in 1918. His reel
tion by a great majority was conc
ed when the police of, Boston wal
out on a strike. After a night
rioting ,the governor took a firm ha
and with the aid of the state guar
men restored order and destroyed
ery effort of the policemen to
back their positions. This is p
haps the most spectacular incid
in the public life of Calvin Coolid
and though his name is associated
Massachusetts with many desira
reforms, it is for his resourcefuln
and courage which he showed in I
crisis, that the mass of the pec
know him.
The nation mourns President B
ding, but it looks with hope to
new chief executive.

0

Y Y,
a
s !;
;$$
, n.

A Striking Sale on All Summer HATS for
Ladies, Misses and Children. .

ALSO NEW FALL HATS
TO BE SHOWN SATURDAY

I

POPULAR PRICE HAT SHOP
333 South Main

h'

--r

_

per left,, the Harding home at Marion, Ohio. Upper right, President an d Mrs. Harding snapped at their Wash-
ington home during Harding campaign in 1920. Lower left, the Hard ings snapped on the steps of the White
House. Lower right, Mrs. Harding while vacationing in Florida with the President. Center, favorite por-
trait of Mrs. Harding.

GOLF, SUPPLIES,

A BAG OF MacGregor Clubs WILL GIVE YOU
CONFIDENCE AND IMPROVE YOUR GAME.I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

lication in the
rersity. Copy

Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
received in the Office of the Summer Session until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. daturday.)
SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1923 Number 117

8

chology of Advertising 25as:
Professor Adams expects to meet his classes aga n
day, August 6. Members of Professor Adams' classes should see bul-
a board on second floor of Natural Science building for assignments.
C. H. GRIFFITHS.
;neering Students:
One or two draftsmen with some experience in detail work are needed
part time work (a couple of hours a day) on the campus. Those inter-
d see the undersigned, Room 341, Engineering Building, between 8:30
12 a. m. or 1 and 3 p. m.
F. W. PAWLOWSI-
ibers of the Cosmopolitan, Club:
An invitation has been received b)y the Club from Mr. and Mrs. Fred-
k W. Stevens to a garden party at.their home at 1245 Ferdon Road on
day, August 5, from 4 to 6 p. m. Members and foreign students who are
rested in the club are requested to be present. IA
WILLIAM C. WANG.
ference on the Social Sciences In the Public Schools:x
On Friday, August 10th, a conference on the Social Sciences in the '
lic Schools will be held from 2 to 4:45 p. m. in the Auditorium of the.
iral Science Building. Professor T. H. Reed, of the department of Pol-
d Science, will preside. Addresses vill be given by Professor William
Brayer of the, department of History, Professor C. O. Davis, of the
)l of Edication, Professor A. E. Wood, of the department of Sociology',
[r. PhilipLovejoy, of Benton Harbor. There will be an opportunity'
general discussion 'All interested are cordially invited to attend.
Chairman.'
A. E. COURNYER,

MRS HARBO S LIFE ONE
OF CONTINUAL STRUGGLES
(Continued fom Page One)
activity, ;and the discontinuance of
her visits to the executive offices was
the first signal that she had been
compelled to narrow the scope of her
activities. The social program of the
White House was continued without
abatement up to the time of her col-
lapse and serious illness in the sum-
mer of 1922.
Overtasked Her Endur'ance
The armament conference imposed
upon the mistress of ttie White House
a task particularly arduous, and it
was not-long after the conference end-
ed that she began to fail appreciably
and by late summer she lapsed into
a condition from which her physicians
believed she could never recover. That
she was able to do so, they conceded,
was due in large measure to her un-
alterable determination and confid-
ence. For weeks she was confined to
a wheel chair, and when she began
to get about again, she' was taken to
Florida for a long rest.
After this illness, her thoughtful-
ness for others who were ill seemed
to increase. Wounded war veterans
have been her particular ?care, and
more than one owes to her his rehabil-
his interest in life.
Is Vigorouis-Minded
Mrs. Harding is recognized as one
of the most; vigorous-minded women
who ever presided over the household
of a President. Of slight build and
medium height, Mrs. Harding carries
herself strongly erect and with charm-.
ing dignity. She never cared for os-
tentatious show. During the whole
time she was mistress of the execu-
tive mansion, Mrs. Harding combined
her social duties and unwavering al-
legiance to her convictions, and dis-
played in doing so a degree of tact
which has won for her universal es-
teem. The social usages so long a
part of official Washington life were
preserved by her to the letter but
without ostentation. Now that her
greatest interest has been taken from
her, only the supreme courage that
Florence Harding has always shown
will be able to carry her on.
None Killed in Bad Wreck
Flint, Aug. 3-(By A.P.)-Passen-
gers on the Chicago flier on the Grand
Trunk railway had a narrow escape
from death or injury when the loco-
motive collided with a switch engine,
hurling the p'assenger locomotive ten-
der and baggage car into the ditch,
and hurling, the switchtengine and
tender several feet east of the point
of contact.
No passenger cars were derailed.

w

AHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

;I

Cc

II

NHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
a. m.-Excursion No. 12. State
ison and Consumers Power com-
ny plant, Jackson. Trip ends at
p" m.
MONDAY
-Lecture, "The Serious Side of
ay." Prof. Elmer D. Mitchefl.
TUESDAY
-Lecture, "Reminiscences of In-
,n Politics." Prof. C. H. Van

food shortage agains is be.oming
acute; farmers refuse to give good po-
tatoes for bad.money,.

AT THE TAE

Screen-Toda

I.

Majestic - Johnny
"Luck."
Orpheum-Constance
in "A Lady's Name.
Wuerth--Tom Mix in
Land-"

ATERS I
Lty
Hines in
Talmadge
"Romance
eek
The Bon-
"The Bird
1

CHURCH OF CHRIST
(DISCIPLES)
LANE HALL
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
9:30 A. M. Bible School..
10:30 A. M. Sermon./
Subject:."The Progress of the
Kingdom:"'
12:00 A. M. Men's Service Club.
Students' Class.
6:30 P. M. Christian Endeavor.
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Corner Third and W. Huron Sts.
CARL A. BRAUER, Pastor
Sermon: "Christ Our High Priest."
9:00 A. M. Preparatory in German,
9:00 A. M. Holy Communion in
German.
10:30 A. M. Bible School.
11:30 A. M. Preparatory service
and Holy Communion- Eng-
lish.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Rev. A. W* Stalker, D. D., Pastor
10:30 A: M. Morning Worship.
Subject: "The Tragedy of
Change" by Dr. P. V. Roberts.
12:00 M. Student Bible Class.
Topic of Discussion "Christ-
sanity and Science."
6:30 P. M. Wesleyan Guild De-
votional Meeting at Wesley
Hall. Subject: "The Test of
Love." Leader: Mr. Edward
T. Ramsdell.
- FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
R. EDWARD SAYLES, Minister
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN,
Minister for Students
10:30 Morning Worship. Sermon
by Mr. Sayles: "Mountains
and Valleys."
11:45 The Guild Bible Class for
Students will, be conducted
by Mr. George Bigge, M.A.
It will meet in the church.
7:00 The out-of-door service on
the library steps. Mr. Sayles
will speak on "A Record
Students are invited.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

On the plaza in front of the University Library
7:00 P. M

DIVISION AND HURON
Rev. L. A. Barrett, D.D., Minister
Lewis C. Reimann, Secretary Men Students

10:30 A. M. Morning Service. Rev. Robert Brown of Bad Axe will preach.

Rev. I. Edward Sayles, Baptist Palstor, will speak on the subject:
"A Record True"
Mass singing under direction of Kenneth R. Westerman
Summer School students and all other Ann Arbor people
are cordially urged to attend.

Intermediate and Primary Sunday Schools meet at 10:30.
Bible Class for Young People at noon.

Those desiring to go to the U. of M. Fresh Air Camp meet at Church al
2:30. All students interested cordially invited. Come and see
the kids.
---

Attru fi uxr pru r urn

-3IsceVlneous Readings.
ss in Interpretive Reading.
rsity Hall,.) 2

The
(Un-

*#. ktidru'n ?Episrnp~tt (~Iurcd

TJ-NOTICES
mer session students desiring to
e the Union Building this summer
1st obtain card at desk. A di-
ry of all students has been com-
Led.
Food Shortage Acute
tsseldorg, Aug. 2.-(By A.P.)---The

Corner Catherine and Division Street

Stage-This W(

t

Henry Lewis, Rector
SUNDAY SERVICES

Garrick (Detroit) -
stelle company In
of Paradise."

8:00 A. M. Holy Communion.
10:30 A, M. Holy Communion and Sermon by the Rev. George Back-
hurst of St. Mark's Church, Marine City.

Monday Feast of The Transfiguration.

#'

.

7:15 A. M. Holy Communion in Williams Memorial Chapel.

1.

_ '1

I

lent Su
1111 SOUTH UN'IVE

Cpl
ITY AV

Store'

HARRIS HALL
Corner State and Huron Streets
Holy Communion, 7:15 A. M, Williams

Thursday

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan